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Diabetes Mashed Potatoes

Simple Mashed Cauliflower Recipe

Simple Mashed Cauliflower Recipe

*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calorie a day is used for general nutrition advice. If you would like to give up mashed potatoes but can't imagine doing so, try pureed or mashed caulifloweryou may never look back! Mashed cauliflower is a great substitute for mashed potatoesthey have a similar look and feel, andare low in carbs and high in nutrients, and the "cauli-taste" is very mild. Try it even if you think you won't like itmany non-believers are now huge cauliflower puree fans. Although you don't need to add flavor, throwing in a little garlic is a great addition or Parmesan cheese or both. About 1/4 cup of any combination of butter, milk, cream, or whatever you use when you make mashed potatoes, optional Optional flavorings: minced garlic (a clove or two); garlic powder(1/2 to 1 teaspoon); grated cheese such as Parmesan Break the cauliflower up into florets, or just chop up the head into pieces.Microwave or steam until it's tendera fork should easily pierce it. Place cauliflower in a food processor and blend until smooth and creamy; season with salt and pepper. Taste before adding any butter and/or milkyou may decide it's creamy and flavorful enough on its own. If not, add the butter, milk, and/or cream and blend until mixed in. If using any additional flavorings add to food processor and pulse until mixed. Ingredient Substitutions and Cooking Tips If you'd like the cauliflower puree to have a more "mashed potato" texture, you can add instant "potatoes" made for low-carb diets, such asDixie Carb Counters Instant Mashers. Other people use a small amount of real potato or instant potatoes to improve the texture, but, to be honest, you don't need any of these additions. Continue reading >>

Great Food Swaps For Diabetes—mashed Potatoes

Great Food Swaps For Diabetes—mashed Potatoes

To have comforting, creamy, mashed potatoes without chalking up 35 grams of carbs in a one-cup serving, try this half-and-half strategy. Use half the amount of potatoes you want for your dish. A medium potato contains about 33 grams of carbs and 3 grams of fiber per cup. Then use an equal amount of either turnips (about 8 grams of carbs and 3 grams of fiber per cup), rutabaga (about 15 grams of carbs and 3 grams of fiber per cup), cauliflower (about 3 grams of carbs and 2 grams of fiber per cup) or some combination of the three. Boil or microwave the potatoes and vegetables, and mash these up together. Add softened butter. Then, warm some cream or half-and-half in the microwave, and beat in until smooth. Salt and pepper to taste. For extra flavor, add minced garlic (raw or gently cooked) to the butter mixture, or mix in some grated Parmesan, romano, or asiago cheese. Continue reading >>

Mashed Potatoes On A Diabetic Diet

Mashed Potatoes On A Diabetic Diet

According to the North Carolina Potato Association, the average adult consumes about one potato each day, and potatoes are the second most consumed food in America after dairy products. A side of mashed potatoes with a meal may be an American staple, but if you have diabetes, you may be concerned about the carbohydrate content of this popular side dish. You can include mashed potatoes as part of your diabetic diet, and preparation and serving size will help you keep your blood sugar under control. Video of the Day Carbohydrates and Mashed Potatoes Diabetes occurs when your body cannot effectively control your blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates affect blood sugar, so the American Diabetes Association's meal plan recommends that people with diabetes limit their carbohydrate intake to 45 percent of their total calories, or 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Fruit, vegetables, grains, breads and added sugar all contribute to the carbohydrate total of your meal. One cup of mashed potatoes prepared with whole milk provides 174 calories and 37 grams of carbohydrates, between 62 and 82 percent of the total carbohydrates recommended for an entire meal. Mashed potatoes also rate high on the glycemic index, a tool that measures a food's impact on blood sugar levels. Unprocessed, high-fiber foods, such as whole grains and most fruits and vegetables, tend to be low-glycemic foods because fiber slows the rate of blood sugar increase. Processing and cooking often increases the glycemic index of foods. High-glycemic foods have a rating of 70 or above. The University of Sydney’s glycemic index database reports that mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 83. Instant mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 87, according to Harvard Health Publications. If you follow the glycemic Continue reading >>

Potatoes And Diabetes

Potatoes And Diabetes

Potatoes are another staple we've all grown to love over the years. BUT if you have diabetes, potatoes are a no no if you want to lower blood sugar and A1C. Why? Quite simply, they are a high carbohydrate food, and they are also high glycemic index as well, meaning they cause rapid rises in blood sugar. If you go searching out on the web, you will still see lots of diabetic recipes containing potatoes. There are thousands of recipes and meals out there promoted to be diabetic friendly, but they're not. Here you'll only find low carb recipes that are going to help you gain better control. So let's briefly explore some potato nutrition facts and then share some potato alternatives and a recipe you can try. Potato Nutrition Facts Potatoes range from 21 g carbs through to around 35 g carbs per one medium potato. There is such a wide range in carb count because it depends on the type of potato. Even at 21 g that's quite high for a single potato – chances are you'd probably want to eat more. It's also the same for glycemic index (GI) – it ranges from 60 right up to 95. Anything below 55 is considered a low GI, and the higher it gets over 55, the more rapidly it is going to send your blood sugar soaring. Even 60 is a high GI, and 95, well that's crazy high. So unfortunately, eating potatoes is not going to help you lower blood sugar or A1C and keep things under control. Sorry to be the bearer of the bad news if you didn't know this already. But there are some tasty alternatives. Sure, there's nothing quite like potato. But we can adapt and use other things – here comes cauliflower again! Cauliflower Cauliflower is a very adaptive, versatile vegetable – we talked about that recently in our rice alternatives post and hopefully you gave the cauliflower rice a try. Because Continue reading >>

Creamy Mashed Cauliflower

Creamy Mashed Cauliflower

Mashed potatoes have lots of carbs, but this satisfying alternative doesn’t. Ingredients 8 cups bite-size cauliflower florets (about 1 head) 4 cloves garlic, crushed and peeled 1/3 cup nonfat buttermilk (see Tip) 4 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 1 teaspoon butter 1/2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper to taste Snipped fresh chives for garnish Directions Place cauliflower florets and garlic in a steamer basket over boiling water, cover and steam until very tender, 12 to 15 minutes. (Alternatively, place florets and garlic in a microwave-safe bowl with 1/4 cup water, cover and microwave on High for 3 to 5 minutes.) Place the cooked cauliflower and garlic in a food processor. Add buttermilk, 2 teaspoons oil, butter, salt and pepper; pulse several times, then process until smooth and creamy. Transfer to a serving bowl. Drizzle with the remaining 2 teaspoons oil and garnish with chives, if desired. Serve hot. If you don’t have buttermilk you can use buttermilk powder prepared according to package directions. Or make “sour milk”: mix 1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar to 1 cup milk. Continue reading >>

Easy Half-mashed Potatoes

Easy Half-mashed Potatoes

Leaving the skin on the potatoes increases the fiber in this recipe. By mixing the cauliflower with potatoes, you get the same volume for less carbs! 24 ounce (1lb 8 oz) bag fingerling petite potatoes, cut into 1-inch rounds with skin-on Add potatoes to a large soup pot. Cover with cold water and bring to a boil. Cook for 15 minutes. Add cauliflower to pot, return to a boil, and cook for 5 more minutes. Drain potatoes and cauliflower and return to pot. Add remaining ingredients and mash mixture with a potato masher. Mix with an electric mixer on low-speed for about 1 minute. MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: Confirm all ingredients are gluten-free and this recipe can be made gluten-free. Find practical tips for reducing holiday stress and keeping up with healthy habits and diabetes control. Holiday travel can be stressful. Here's a guide to help you make better choices while at the airport. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk more than 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's very active. This number estimates how many calories you should eat per day to keep your body weight where it is now. If you want to lose weight, you may need fewer calories. You should talk with your health care te Continue reading >>

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Eat Potatoes?

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Eat Potatoes?

Despite being the most popular vegetable in the United States, potatoes have fallen out of favour somewhat with nutritionists over the last few decades due to a relatively low nutrient density and high levels of quickly absorbed carbohydrates. Many diabetics avoid potatoes altogether for fear of exacerbating their condition. Fortunately the news is not all bad when it comes to diabetes and potatoes and most diabetics can include a modest level of potatoes in their diet. The main reason diabetics are cautious when it comes to potatoes is their very high glycemic index (GI) value. The glycemic index is important for diabetics because it is a measure of the impact a particular food has on blood glucose levels once it has been digested. Eating large amounts of foods with high GI values results in a large increase in blood sugar levels which would normally result in a corresponding rise in insulin to bring blood sugar levels back to a normal level within a few hours. Because diabetics have an impaired insulin response, blood sugar levels can remain very high for quite some time leading to the typical symptoms of diabetes such as excessive thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and nerve problems. Potatoes have a GI value that ranges from 65 to 80 which is considered high. By comparison table sugar (sucrose) has a GI of 63, white bread has a GI of 71, wholemeal bread a GI of 60, and brown rice a GI of 55. Interestingly the method of cooking and variety of potato can affect the GI value of potatoes greatly. Newer potatoes tend to have lower GI values than older potatoes. Waxy potato varieties such as Red Norland, Yellow Finn, and Red Pontiac have lower GI values than floury potato varieties such as Russet Burbank and Norgold Russet. A 2005 study published in The Journal of the Continue reading >>

Paula Deen (again), And Instant Mashed Potatoes With Tv Dinners

Paula Deen (again), And Instant Mashed Potatoes With Tv Dinners

Need help navigating life with diabetes? Ask D'Mine! That would be our weekly advice column, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil is offering some thought on a recent episode of The View where type 2 Paula Deen co-hosted as a "diabetes spokesperson." Then, Wil delves into another aspect of food and diabetes by telling us what we should know about certain TV dinners. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Jeannie, type 2 from Pennsylvania, writes: I caught the episode of "The View" recently where Paula Deen was the featured guest. After she told her story of getting diagnosed with diabetes, changing her eating habits and losing 30 pounds, I was shocked to hear her promoting the idea of "one day a week of indulgence." She says on Sundays, she and her family eat all their favorite rich foods and desserts. Doesn't this stand against everything we PWDs need to do to make positive and permanent changes? I was outraged about this, but maybe I'm overreacting here...? [email protected] D'Mine answers: Ahhh.... so many issues... so little space. Well, I think we all need to cut Ms. Deen some slack. She's like one of those Old Testament prophets who gets dragged kicking and screaming into the good Lord's service. In a sad, Greek tragedy sort of way, she's playing out on the big stage the private battle that most people go through when they're diagnosed. I mean, would everyone who ever wanted diabetes please raise your hands? Nobody? I'm not too surprised. I think a lot of us, particularly those of us lucky enough to have fallen into education or advocacy roles, are sort of perversely glad, in retrospect, that we got diabetes; but no child ever said, "Yeah, I want to be diabetic when I grow up!" A diabetes diagno Continue reading >>

Diabetic Creamy Mashed Potatoes Recipe - Diabetes Self-management

Diabetic Creamy Mashed Potatoes Recipe - Diabetes Self-management

Place sliced potatoes in a pan and cover with water. Put lid on pan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil until potatoes are tender (about 15 minutes). Drain well. Using an electric mixer on high, mash potatoes until smooth; periodically scraping down sides of pan. Add 3 tablespoons half-and-half and continue beating, periodically scraping down sides of pan. Add sour cream, butter-flavor sprinkles, salt, and pepper; continue mixing until smooth and combined. Thin as needed with remaining 2 tablespoons half-and-half. Calories: 93 calories, Carbohydrates: 19 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 1 g, Saturated Fat: < 1 g, Sodium: 146 mg, Fiber: 1 g Exchanges per serving: 1 starch. Carbohydrate choices: 1 1/2. This recipe was developed by Tami Ross, a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

Getty Images What to Eat to Beat Type 2 Diabetes What makes a food “super”? When it comes to type 2 diabetes, it’s not just about foods that pack lots of nutrients. For a diabetes-friendly diet, you also need foods that will help keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Look for items that contain healthy fats and are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, a certified diabetes educator at Burgess Health Center in Onawa, Iowa. It’s also crucial to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure you’re getting a healthy mix of phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. Add these 11 superfoods to your grocery cart to keep your diet diabetes-friendly. Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Mashed Potato | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Mashed Potato | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community When I was diagnosed with T2 a few months ago I was told that I could have potatoes but not mashed potato. Does anyone know why mashed is so bad? Mashing it releases the starch. This means it can be digested quicker which resides your blood glucose more quickly. Jacket potatos are similarly bad. Even boiled old potatos are too starchy. A few boiled new potatos aren't so bad, if you have old pots then roast is better as the fat slows down the absorption Thanks Grazer, I'll stick to boiled new, though I miss mashed. Regarding potatos...I do find my Homemade chips in small quantity are not bad at all-I peel and chop them ready in advance and keep them soaked in a big bowl of cold salted water for several hours and before cooking i keep emptying the water and rinsing under the tap and you'd be amazed how much milky looking starch goes down the sink drainer!! with a lot of the starch gone-I find that they spike me FAR less than any frozen chip that I've ever deep fried! Thanks, Paul1976, that's interesting, I miss chips too and might give that a go on occasions. chips are same as roast - the fat slows the absorption. Yep the only way I eat spuds nowadays is roast and chips. I can eat 8 medium sized chips the last time I tried but of course others may manage more. Mashed potatoes is the devils food. It should have one of those radiation warning signs put on the plate by law. :lol: I do a similar kind of trick with bread. I had real problems with even half a slice of Burgen but can now eat a WHOLE slice as long as its as toast. I'll score the toast with a knife and try and get it to soak up as much butter as I can without getting silly. Similar principle as Continue reading >>

Easy Cauliflower Mashed “potatoes” Recipe

Easy Cauliflower Mashed “potatoes” Recipe

Ingredients Print Recipe 1 head cauliflower 1 clove garlic optional 1/8 cup skim milk You can also use plain yogurt or butter 1 pinch salt & pepper to taste 1 sprinkle paprika Servings: cups Units:MetricUS Imperial Votes: 23 Rating: 3.17 You: Rate this recipe! Carbs Per Serving:16g Prep Time:10minutes Cook Time:8minutes Passive Time:0minutes Course Side Dish, Vegetables Cuisine Chicken, Pork, Thanksgiving, Vegetarian Pre-heat your oven to 400 degrees. Steam or boil cauliflower (optionally with a clove of garlic) until tender. Cut the cauliflower into pieces and place in a blender with the milk, yogurt or butter. Season with salt and pepper and whip until smooth. To save time, you can use a hand-powered immersion blender. Pour cauliflower into small baking dish, sprinkle with paprika and bake in a 400 degree oven until bubbly. The recipe is enough to serve two to four people depending upon the size of the cauliflower. It can easily be doubled. Community members have shared a variety of variations you can use. Share yours in the comments: "I made this tonight with dinner. It was better than I expected. I think these actually might taste better than real mashed potatoes. I added fresh parmesan cheese and two spoonfuls of horseradish and blended it in the food processor. I sprinkled more parmesan on top along with some crushed, dried garlic before baking." - Melissa "I love it mashed & would like to share a tip that makes the texture thicker, which I like better. After steaming (or boiling) I place the cauliflower in a colander and gently press it with a masher to remove all the water. Next - return it to the kettle and mash it, then add whatever you prefer. I use S&P, then dot it with butter & put the lid back on - just like mashed potato's. Absolute favorite is to thicken Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Can people with diabetes eat potatoes? The answer is yes, and even more resounding when you have some info in your back pocket. Potatoes come in every form imaginable—from chips to potato salad, from fries to baked potatoes with butter and sour cream. Some forms are obviously more nutritious than others. And all can have varying effects on blood sugar. Here are some recommendations: Sweet potatoes and yams are good choices on the potato spectrum as they have a lower glycemic index and glycemic load than a regular baked russet potato, therefore affecting blood glucose less. Small red potatoes with the skin can also be a good choice. The skin provides fiber, which slows digestion and absorption. And small, whole potatoes may be easier to portion control. Serve a few on your plate as opposed to a whole baked potato or scoop of mashed potatoes. Try to limit fried potatoes and potato chips, choosing roasted, baked or broiled instead. Be aware of portion size. The plate method is an easy way to manage this: about ¼ of your plate should come from starchy foods and only the depth of a deck of cards. It might not be the potato itself wreaking havoc on blood sugar, but instead the portion of potatoes if it is more than about ¾ to 1 cup. Many, many years ago, nurses, dietitians, and diabetes educators were instructed to teach their patients with diabetes to eat certain foods and not eat others. But in more modern times, the belief and teaching method is based on making healthy food choices, understanding portion sizes, and learning the best times to eat in order to manage diabetes. This method of not having to eliminate foods from the diet is supported by the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Blood glucose control and food choice Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

What Should I Eat If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Q. Newly diabetic (Type 2). What can I eat and what shouldn’t I eat? Will one day matter? — risa59, Upstate N.Y. A. With all forms of diabetes, the goal is consistent management of your blood sugar to prevent the long-term damage to nerves, blood vessels and organs that can result from uncontrolled diabetes. When you have Type 2 diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or is unable to use it well. Overeating, particularly high carbohydrate foods like many of those served at Thanksgiving, will cause your blood sugar to rise. Even in the short-term, this can cause headaches, fatigue and leave you feeling generally lousy. Thanksgiving is just one day, but you will feel better and enjoy the holiday more if you pay attention to what and how much you eat. This doesn’t mean you have to miss out on your favorite foods. Hopefully, you are working with your doctor or a dietitian and learning about monitoring your blood sugar, counting carbohydrates in foods and staying active. For Thanksgiving, feel free to taste everything, but pay attention to portion size and limit your intake of high-carbohydrate foods. Remember that drinks like alcoholic beverages and eggnog are loaded with sugars, so it’s often a good idea to skip these and drink water since the table is likely to be filled with many of your favorite high-carb foods. Many diabetes educators advise patients to use a plate strategy during holiday time. Fill half of your 9-inch plate with nonstarchy vegetables — this includes salad, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, turnips, carrots and others. (You can find list of nonstarchy vegetables here.) Reserve a quarter of your plate for the turkey, but leave off the skin. The remaining quarter of your plate can include dollops of your favorite starchy foods l Continue reading >>

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