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Diabetes Major Weight Loss

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Millions of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes could be cured of the disease if they just lost weight, a new study suggests. Scientists at Newcastle University have shown the disease is caused by fat accumulating in the pancreas and losing less than one gram from the organ can reverse the life-limiting illness and restore insulin production. Type 2 diabetes affects 3.3 million people in England and Wales and, until now, was thought to be chronic. It can lead to blindness, stroke, kidney failure and limb amputation. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal” Professor Roy Taylor, Newcastle University But now researchers at Newcastle have shown that the disease can be reversed, even in obese people who have had the condition for a long time. 18 obese people with Type 2 diabetes who were given gastric band surgery and put on a restricted diet for eight weeks were cured of their condition. During the trial the patients, aged between 25 and 65, lost an average of 2.2 stone, which was around 13 per cent of their body weight. Crucially they also lost 0.6 grams of fat from their pancreas, allowing the organ to secrete normal levels of insulin. The team is now planning a larger two year study involving 200 people with Glasgow University to check that the findings can be replicated and weight loss can be sustained for two years. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal,” said Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University who also works within the Newcastle Hospitals. “So if you ask how much weight you need to lose to make your diabetes go away, the answer is one gram. But t Continue reading >>

> Weight And Diabetes

> Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it to the muscles. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of it through urine. This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called ins Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diets For Weight Loss

Diabetic Diets For Weight Loss

If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Efficacy Of Liraglutide For Weight Loss Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetesthe Scale Diabetes Randomized Clinical Trial

Efficacy Of Liraglutide For Weight Loss Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetesthe Scale Diabetes Randomized Clinical Trial

Importance Weight loss of 5% to 10% can improve type 2 diabetes and related comorbidities. Few safe, effective weight-management drugs are currently available. Objective To investigate efficacy and safety of liraglutide vs placebo for weight management in adults with overweight or obesity and type 2 diabetes. Design, Setting, and Participants Fifty-six–week randomized (2:1:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial with 12-week observational off-drug follow-up period. The study was conducted at 126 sites in 9 countries between June 2011 and January 2013. Of 1361 participants assessed for eligibility, 846 were randomized. Inclusion criteria were body mass index of 27.0 or greater, age 18 years or older, taking 0 to 3 oral hypoglycemic agents (metformin, thiazolidinedione, sulfonylurea) with stable body weight, and glycated hemoglobin level 7.0% to 10.0%. Interventions Once-daily, subcutaneous liraglutide (3.0 mg) (n = 423), liraglutide (1.8 mg) (n = 211), or placebo (n = 212), all as adjunct to 500 kcal/d dietary deficit and increased physical activity (≥150 min/wk). Main Outcomes and Measures Three coprimary end points: relative change in weight, proportion of participants losing 5% or more, or more than 10%, of baseline weight at week 56. Results Baseline weight was 105.7 kg with liraglutide (3.0-mg dose), 105.8 kg with liraglutide (1.8-mg dose), and 106.5 kg with placebo. Weight loss was 6.0% (6.4 kg) with liraglutide (3.0-mg dose), 4.7% (5.0 kg) with liraglutide (1.8-mg dose), and 2.0% (2.2 kg) with placebo (estimated difference for liraglutide [3.0 mg] vs placebo, −4.00% [95% CI, −5.10% to −2.90%]; liraglutide [1.8 mg] vs placebo, −2.71% [95% CI, −4.00% to −1.42%]; P < .001 for both). Weight loss of 5% or greater occurred in 54.3% wit Continue reading >>

Weight Management And Diabetes: Should You Lose Weight?

Weight Management And Diabetes: Should You Lose Weight?

For individuals with diabetes who are overweight or obese, moderate weight loss can help improve insulin resistance and glycemic outcomes. Modest weight loss means losing about 5 to 7 percent of your weight. For example, at a weight of 165 pounds, modest weight loss would equate to shedding 8 pounds. Losing this amount of weight may improve how your body responds to insulin and your overall glucose levels. Finding Your BMI Many people don't know their current weight or if they are at a healthy weight, overweight or obese status. Do a quick check to calculate body mass index with this formula: [weight (in pounds) x 703] / [height (in inches)2] or use the Academy BMI calculator. For example, an individual at 5 feet and 6 inches tall weighing 165 pounds (165 x 703) / (662) has a BMI of 26.6, which is in the overweight category. BMI Weight Status Below 18.5 Underweight 18.5 to 24.9 Normal or Healthy Weight 25.0 to 29.9 Overweight Over 29.9 Obese In addition to BMI, other physical measurements, such as body fat percentage, distribution of body fat and waist circumference, are important methods of assessing overweight and obesity. It is unclear if weight loss alone has a significant impact on glycemic control. Research has found improvements in HgA1c and blood lipids such as triglycerides and cholesterol with weight loss in some people with diabetes but not others. Controlling blood sugar is the best way to manage diabetes. Eating right and getting enough physical activity are important for diabetes management. With your registered dietitian nutritionist and diabetes health care team, you will choose a treatment plan that is best for you. Together you have the best chance for success. The bottom line is that modest weight loss may help improve your diabetes outcomes if you ar Continue reading >>

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes symptoms Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90% of those people have type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, rising blood sugar acts like a poison. Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. "Almost every day people come into my office with diabetes who don't know it," says Maria Collazo-Clavell, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The best way to pick up on it is to have a blood sugar test. But if you have these symptoms, see your doctor. Watch the video: 5 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Increased urination, excessive thirst If you need to urinate frequently—particularly if you often have to get up at night to use the bathroom—it could be a symptom of diabetes. The kidneys kick into high gear to get rid of all that extra glucose in the blood, hence the urge to relieve yourself, sometimes several times during the night. The excessive thirst means your body is trying to replenish those lost fluids. These two symptoms go hand in hand and are some of "your body's ways of trying to manage high blood sugar," explains Dr. Collazo-Clavell. Weight loss Overly high blood sugar levels can also cause rapid weight loss, say 10 to 20 pounds over two or three months—but this is not a healthy weight loss. Because the insulin hormone isn't getting glucose into the cells, where it can be used as energy, the body thinks it's starving and starts breaking down protein from the muscles as an alternate source of fuel. The kidneys are also working overtime to eliminate the excess sugar, and this leads to a loss of calories (and can harm the kidneys). "These are processes that require a lot of energy," Dr. Collazo-Clavell notes. "You create a calorie deficit." Hunger Continue reading >>

Weight And Diabetes: Lose Pounds To Lower Your Risk

Weight And Diabetes: Lose Pounds To Lower Your Risk

If you’re overweight, you’ve probably thought about shedding some pounds. If you have diabetes or are at risk for getting it, you should stop thinking and start doing -- now. Why? Because excess weight puts a strain on your body in all sorts of ways. “If I suddenly take a bunch of gravel and throw it in the back of your car, you can still probably make 70 mph on the interstate. But you’re going to make the engine work a little harder. If I put 1,000 pounds in your car, that effect increases. I can probably put enough weight in so, eventually, your car no longer can perform like it needs to,” says David Marrero, PhD, president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association. It sounds harsh, but the truth is, that extra weight in your trunk? It can lead to a higher risk of heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and diabetes, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Your engine already is whining. Ditch the gravel. You might be surprised at how dropping just a few pounds can make a dramatic difference. “What we know in diabetes prevention, and in prediabetes, is that a very modest amount of weight loss has this huge reduction in risk,” Marrero says. “You lose 7% of your body weight, you cut your risk [of developing diabetes] by 60%. And, in fact, if you’re over 65, it’s over 70%." But how do you not just lose weight, but keep it off? Through a combination of exercise and watching what you eat. If you’re overweight and have diabetes, or are at risk of getting it, you have to exercise. There’s no way around it. “In your body, what exercise does, is it allows you to bind or uptake insulin more efficiently,” Marrero says. Your pancreas makes insulin, a hormone that “unlocks” the cells so they c Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes-friendly Diets To Help You Lose Weight

The Best Diabetes-friendly Diets To Help You Lose Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for everyone, but if you have diabetes, excess weight may make it harder to control your blood sugar levels and may increase your risk for some complications. Losing weight can be extra challenging for people with diabetes. Eating healthfully while you try to reduce weight is important for everyone, but if you have diabetes, choosing the wrong diet could harm your health. Weight loss pills and starvation diets should be avoided, but there are many popular diets that may be beneficial. Diabetes and diet: What’s the connection? If you have diabetes, you should focus on eating lean protein, high-fiber, less processed carbs, fruits, and vegetables, low-fat dairy, and healthy vegetable-based fats such as avocado, nuts, canola oil, or olive oil. You should also manage your carbohydrate intake. Have your doctor or dietitian provide you with a target carb number for meals and snacks. Generally, women should aim for about 45 grams of carb per meal while men should aim for 60. Ideally, these would come from complex carbs, fruits, and vegetables. The American Diabetes Association offers a comprehensive list of the best foods for those with diabetes. Their recommendations include: Protein Fruits and vegetables Dairy Grains beans berries low- or nonfat milk whole grains, such as brown rice and whole-wheat pasta nuts sweet potatoes low- or nonfat yogurt poultry nonstarchy vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, collard greens, kale, and okra eggs oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines Staying hydrated is also important when it comes to overall health. Choose noncaloric options such as water and tea whenever possible. For people with diabetes, there are certain foods that should be limited. These foods can cause spikes in the Continue reading >>

Gastric Bypass In Type 2 Diabetes With Bmi < 30: Weight And Weight Loss Have A Major Influence On Outcomes.

Gastric Bypass In Type 2 Diabetes With Bmi < 30: Weight And Weight Loss Have A Major Influence On Outcomes.

Abstract AIM: To assess factors influencing glycaemic control following gastric bypass surgery in patients with Type 2 diabetes and BMI< 30 kg/m(2) . METHODS: Prospective longitudinal study of 103 patients with inadequate glycaemic control who underwent gastric bypass surgery at Soonchunhyang University, Seoul, Korea (n = 66) and Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (n = 37). Procedures were performed August 2009 to January 2011. Key outcome measures were excellent glycaemic control of Type 2 diabetes defined as HbA1c < 42 mmol/mol (≤6%); inadequate response defined as HbA1c > 53 mmol/mol (> 7%). Analysis was conducted using binary logistic regression, and cut-points obtained from receiver operator characteristics. RESULTS: Excellent glycaemic control was achieved in 31 (30%) at 1 year. Diabetes duration of < 7 years and BMI > 27 kg/m(2) provided independent predictors and useful cut-points. Likelihood of excellent glycaemic control for an individual could be estimated using loge (Odds) = -6.7 + (0.26 × BMI) + (-1.2 × diabetes duration). Baseline BMI of < 27 kg/m(2) and baseline C-peptide of < 2.0ng/ml, best predicted a poor glycaemic response. In those with favourable baseline characteristics percentage weight loss (%WL) had a dominant influence on glycaemic outcomes. Baseline C-peptide (> 2.4 ng/ml) and subsequent percentage weight loss (> 16%) were associated with excellent glycaemic control. Higher BMI was associated with greater percentage weight loss. CONCLUSION: In patients with Type 2 diabetes and BMI < 30 kg/m(2) , glycaemic response to gastric bypass is predicted by higher baseline BMI, shorter disease duration and higher fasting C-peptide. Post-surgery weight loss has a dominant effect. Baseline BMI and weight loss have a major influence on outcomes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Digest: Medications That Promote Weight Loss In Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Digest: Medications That Promote Weight Loss In Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes epidemic has reached unprecedented scale; about 9% of all Americans (30 million people) have diabetes, and the trend continues to rise. At the same time, it is estimated that 85 million individuals have prediabetes. These are staggering statistics with tremendous cost to patients and society. Ninety five percent of all patients have type 2 diabetes, which is due to excessive body weight, especially abdominal adiposity or fat. Unlike individuals with type 1 diabetes who have full insulin deficiency, type 2 diabetes patients produce plenty of insulin. But due to excess adiposity insulin does not work well and so blood sugars rise. Surprisingly, insulin is one of the main therapies for type 2 diabetes. Yet insulin is a powerful ‘building’ hormone that can cause significant weight gain, an undesirable consequence in someone who is already overweight or obese. In addition, insulin can also trigger unwanted hypoglycemia (low blood sugars) manifestation of which could vary from feeling hungry to becoming unconscious or developing seizures. So it is reasonable for patients to use other medications that promote weight loss rather than weight gain in type 2 diabetes. Such two drug classes are ‘GLP-1 agonists’ and ‘SGLT-2 inhibitors’; which both can cause 5-15 lbs weight loss. Individuals with type 2 diabetes could therefore benefit greatly from these therapies compared to insulin. Metformin is a frequently prescribed medication that can also cause weight loss in certain patients, in addition to being inexpensive and having few adverse effects. Presently there are five FDA approved ‘GLP-1 agonists’; Bydureon, Byetta, Tanzeum, Trulicity and Victoza. These medications have several benefits such as appetite suppression, eating smaller food portions, increasin Continue reading >>

What's Your Healthy Weight?

What's Your Healthy Weight?

We know that a lot of adults in the UK are overweight or obese and those extra pounds can cause problems with our health, whether we have diabetes or not. Excess weight is linked with heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke and some cancers – as well as Type 2 diabetes. Achieving a healthy weight, and maintaining it, is often easier said that done and it’s one of the hardest things to do for some people. Whether you want to lose or gain a few pounds – or are a healthy weight already – there’s lots of evidence to show that being a healthy weight will benefit your health. These benefits include better blood pressure, cholesterol and blood glucose levels and reducing your risk of developing any long-term health problems. And, most people say they also feel better about how they look. Weight is a sensitive issue for many people and achieving your ideal weight is often easier said than done. For some people, losing weight can be straightforward but keeping the weight off becomes a herculean task, leading to fluctuations in their weight through the years. So, what are the positive steps you can take to lose any extra pounds – or to stop gaining any more? In this section How your clothes fit you is usually a tell-tale sign. But your doctor, nurse or dietitian would probably calculate your Body Mass Index, or BMI, to see if you are a healthy weight for your height – and you can work this out for yourself too, using the NHS Choices tool. Measuring your waist circumference can help you find out how much fat you have stored around your stomach. Measure yours now by finding the top of your hip bone and the bottom of your ribcage, and using a tape measure around your middle at a point midway between these. For many people, this is around the belly button. It should Continue reading >>

Question & Answer

Question & Answer

Is sudden weight loss a sign of diabetes? If so, why? Answer: Kimberly Buss, M.D., M.P.H. Weight loss can occur for many reasons, and involuntary weight loss can be a sign of serious underlying illness. Involuntary weight loss can happen even with an increased appetite or thirst. Some causes of this situation can include intestinal disorders that cause lack of absorption of food (like chronic diarrhea), endocrine disorders that cause the body to burn more energy (like hyperthyroidism), and uncontrolled diabetes, which causes the body to lose excess calories by spilling sugar into the urine. Diabetes is a disorder of elevated blood sugars. Sometimes sugars are just mildly elevated at diagnosis. But sometimes blood sugar can become quite elevated before the diagnosis is made. As the blood sugar level goes up, the body cannot reabsorb all of the sugar that is naturally filtered through the kidneys, and the sugar is spilled in the urine. This causes people who have very high sugars to be very thirsty, and to have to urinate very frequently. Patients will often have sudden significant weight loss associated with these symptoms. These same patients will be so thirsty they will often drink sugary drinks (such as sodas, juices or sweetened coffee drinks) which causes the sugars to be even higher, and the weight loss to be more severe. It can become a sudden dangerous cycle. If you suddenly develop significant involuntary weight loss, especially associated with significant thirst or an increased need to urinate, it is critical to see a health care provider as soon as possible. Read more: Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It? Steps for Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies Continue reading >>

There's Actually A Way To Reverse Diabetes—here's How You Can Do It

There's Actually A Way To Reverse Diabetes—here's How You Can Do It

Can you actually cure type 2 diabetes? Talk to just about any credible source, and it’s typically called a chronic condition—but that may not always be the case, according to a new analysis published in The BMJ. After reviewing remission criteria, blood sugar guidelines, and recent clinical trials, the authors of the paper found that maintaining a weight loss of 33 pounds can actually reverse diabetes for specific patients. Past research has led to promising findings. For instance, one Newcastle University study found that limiting diabetic patients to 700 calories a day for two months led to an average 31-pound weight loss. As a result, nearly half of the people studied experienced a significant drop in their blood sugar levels, taking many patients to pre-diabetic levels instead. When the researchers followed up with those people after 6 months of maintaining their weight loss, they were still diabetes-free. If you’re diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your doctor will generally prescribe medication and offer general advice about improving your diet and exercise—but the key to this study, and others like it, is weight loss. (If you want to shed pounds right now, check out Metashred Extreme from Men's Health, a series of high-intensity workouts designed to help you burn fat. Or, check out the video below.) 13 Exercises That Are Better Than Burpees For Fat Loss: This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. End of dialog window. That’s because too much fat buildup in your pancreas tampers with the organ’s ability to produce insulin, which helps control your blood sugar. When you lose weight, you first lose fat in your organs, Roy Taylor, M.D., author of the Newcastle University study and the recent analysis explain Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Weight Loss

Diabetes And Weight Loss

Tweet Type 2 diabetes is very closely associated with weight, with over 90% of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics above their ideal weight. Being overweight can hurt your confidence, and getting back to a healthy weight can seem like a never-ending challenge. Losing some weight could both prevent you from developing diabetes, or help you to better manage your condition if you have already been diagnosed with diabetes. First things first - weigh yourself First off, work out how overweight you actually are. For many people, weighing yourself is the first step to weighing less. Most people will have an intuitive sense of what a healthy weight is for them, but understanding how much you have to lose can make all the difference in having clear goals. Talking about weight loss can be tough, particularly if you do not know your doctor or diabetes specialist very well, but understanding weight loss can make all the difference. How overweight am I? Get ready to lose weight and keep motivated Getting into the right frame of mind to lose weight can be half the battle for some people. Get your head in good shape and allow the body to follow. Weight loss motivation What can you do? Read up as much as you can, including topics such as diabetes and obesity, and diabetes and metabolic syndrome. That way you will understand your risks and what you have to do. Diabetes prevention starts with losing weight. First things first, discuss weight loss and an individual program with your health care team. Take things slowly at first, and take one step at a time. Which diet will help me to lose weight? The diet industry is huge, but how do you pick a sensible diet? Many diets involve reducing or restricting certain foods which makes some diets more or less appropriate for certain types of people. Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Cure For Diabetes

Weight Loss Cure For Diabetes

Weight loss cure for diabetes G.S. Mudur New Delhi, Sept. 13: Some patients with diabetes may reverse the disease and celebrate long-term remission through drastic weight loss, a team of British doctors said today, challenging the conventional management of diabetes practised for decades. The doctors said there is significant evidence that the reversal of diabetes is now "clearly attainable" for some, possibly many, but most patients and doctors remain oblivious to these developments and still consider the diagnosis of diabetes a permanent label. Well-designed, diet-based strategies have been shown to lead to rapid and substantial weight loss and get patients to maintain a 12kg to 15kg weight loss for periods of a year and sustain it beyond, the doctors said, citing studies in the UK#conducted over the past five years. "It is not easy to achieve this, but every person diagnosed with diabetes should get a chance to try it," Mike Lean, professor of human nutrition at the University of Glasgow who is involved in such weight loss studies told The Telegraph over telephone. var adUnits = [{"code": "div-gpt-ad-prebid-telegraphindia-204", "bids": [{"bidder": "switch", "params": {"domain": "delivery.h.switchadhub.com", "adUnitID": 4098}}, {"bidder": "rubicon", "params": {"accountId": "16944", "siteId": "155050", "zoneId": "738294"}}, {"bidder": "pulsepoint", "params": {"cp": 561335, "cf": "728X90", "ct": 612206}}, {"bidder": "appnexus", "params": {"placementId": "12195712"}}, {"bidder": "districtmDMX", "params": {"id": 178755}}], "sizes": [[728, 90]]}]; var pbjs = pbjs || {}; pbjs.que = pbjs.que || []; var googletag = googletag || {}; googletag.cmd = googletag.cmd || []; googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.pubads().disableInitialLoad();}); pbjs.que.push(function() { pbjs.s Continue reading >>

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