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Diabetes Magazine

Reversing Diabetes

Reversing Diabetes

The soaring rate of sugar disease comes with a brutal price tag: lives, limbs, poor health and high hospital bills. Celeste McGovern looks at evidence-based ways to put the epidemic in reverse It has been called "the biggest epidemic of the 21st century."1 If you don't have diabetes or know someone with it now, it's likely you eventually will. The prevalence of diabetes, now affecting more than 420 million people across the globe,2 has quadrupled in the past 20 years and continues to soar. It is expected that one person in 10—or 642 million—will be diagnosed with diabetes by 2040. Your body and brain ordinarily run on sugar as fuel for all of their functions, but too much sugar in the bloodstream can be damaging—even fatal. In both forms of diabetes, type 1 and type 2, decreased insulin results in symptoms including increased thirst, frequent urination, weight change, fatigue and blurry vision, among others. But those living with a diabetes diagnosis and its symptoms do not need to feel overwhelmed and afraid of their disease forever. The 20 million Americans with a diabetes diagnosis (and the millions more estimated to have pre-diabetes or undiagnosed diabetes) can take control of their condition. Many type 2 diabetics are living proof that the disease can be reversed, sometimes in under 30 days, and type 1 diabetics are able to dramatically reduce their insulin dependence and cut their risks. In fact, a rare few have even challenged the orthodox medical view that being free of insulin altogether is impossible (see box, page 35). To take control of your blood sugar and put your diabetes in the back seat, here are the top five factors to consider. Your weight Despite all the diabetes diets and conflicting information—eat carbs, don't eat carbs, eat fats, eat zer Continue reading >>

Emerging Applications For Intelligent Diabetes Management | Marling | Ai Magazine

Emerging Applications For Intelligent Diabetes Management | Marling | Ai Magazine

Emerging Applications for Intelligent Diabetes Management Cindy Marling, Matthew Wiley, Razvan Bunescu, Jay Shubrook, Frank Schwartz Diabetes management is a difficult task for patients, who must monitor and control their blood glucose levels in order to avoid serious diabetic complications. It is a difficult task for physicians, who must manually interpret large volumes of blood glucose data to tailor therapy to the needs of each patient. This paper describes three emerging applications that employ AI to ease this task: (1) case-based decision support for diabetes management; (2) machine learning classification of blood glucose plots; and (3) support vector regression for blood glucose prediction. The first application provides decision support by detecting blood glucose control problems and recommending therapeutic adjustments to correct them. The second provides an automated screen for excessive glycemic variability. The third aims to build a hypoglycemia predictor that could alert patients to dangerously low blood glucose levels in time to take preventive action. All are products of the 4 Diabetes Support SystemTM project, which uses AI to promote the health and wellbeing of people with type 1 diabetes. These emerging applications could potentially benefit 20 million patients who are at risk for devastating complications, thereby improving quality of life and reducing health care cost expenditures. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Magazines

Diabetes Magazines

The Internet is such a vast and fast way to keep up with diabetes developments that we might be tempted to ignore traditional media. That would be our loss, because, in particular, magazines about diabetes offer a wide range of news and views. While the Internet has a lot more Web sites and mailing lists about diabetes that there are magazines and journals in print, printed periodicals about diabetes contain a huge number of articles. In fact, there are probably many more such publications than most of us would imagine, especially when we include all the newsletters that are essentially the same as magazines. The top 3 magazines. In 1999, Michael Reynolds, the general manager of the now defunct DiabetesWebSite.com, asked me to compile the first comprehensive directory of these publications. Including those that have subsequently appeared, I have found a total of 65. Of these, 34 are journals written primarily for a professional audience. That leaves 31 magazines written for people with diabetes, of which five are published in other countries and 26 in the United States. I doubt if anybody subscribes to all 26 of these magazines. I know that I have read no more than 22 of them myself. In fact, few of these publications are worth the time even of people like me who want to know everything new in the field. If you diligently looked, you could find articles that I wrote in nine of these magazines. The three with the biggest circulations are: Diabetes Self-Management comes across as being much more serious—a prim and proper old lady compared with the other top two magazines. It also seems to completely ignore the online diabetes community and is the only one of the top magazines that hasn’t published any of my articles. Published bimonthly by R.A. Rapaport Publishing Inc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Digest - Diabetic Mag 4+

Diabetes Digest - Diabetic Mag 4+

AAA+ Diabetes Digest - Diabetes Information Digest for Diabetics is a FREE monthly magazine created for diabetics and the people whose lives have been touched by diabetes in one way or another. Every month our team will bring you news, health tips & tricks , healthy recipes, and inspiring stories from other diabetics. We will curate all the best newsworthy stories and deliver them all to you in one central location. Diabetes Magazine Subscription is available for FREE. DOWNLOAD IT NOW to get Diabetes Digest Magazine Delivered Automatically on your iPad every month. SUBSCRIBERS AUTOMATIC-RENEWAL FEATURE: Your subscription automatically renews unless auto-renew is turned off at least 24-hours before the end of the current period. your iTunes account will automatically be charged at the same price for renewal 24-hours prior to the end of the current period (another year for annual subscribers, another month for monthly subscribers) unless you change your subscription preferences in your account settings. You can manage your subscriptions through your Account settings after purchase. No cancellation of the current subscription is allowed during active subscription period. Please go to for more information Please take a moment to update your app review for this new version. Code optimisation and enhancements along with a range of new features Please take a moment to update your app review for this new version. iOS 10 ode optimisation and enhancements along with a range of new features Please take a moment to update your app review for this new version. Code optimisation and enhancements along with a range of new features Please take a moment to update your app review for this new version. Code optimisation and enhancements along with a range of new features Please take a mo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health

Diabetes Health

Diabetes Health magazine, published by King's Publishing in California, United States, is one of the US's biggest magazines focusing on diabetes and the complications that are the everyday concern of people with this disease and also their families and friends. History[edit] After starting a mail-order diabetes supply business in 1989, the company realized that customers needed information as well as supplies. Soon “Diabetes on the Dial,” a radio show featuring interviews of world-class experts in the field of diabetes, was born. The demand for transcripts of the broadcasts lead to the company publishing a monthly magazine, originally named Diabetes Interview, now named Diabetes Health. Published continuously for 24 years, Diabetes Health magazine provides articles about living with diabetes. External links[edit] Diabetes Health Continue reading >>

Diabetes - A Woman's Health - Women Magazine

Diabetes - A Woman's Health - Women Magazine

Modify Your Lifestyle to Prevent Diabetes In people with diabetes, the body is not able to use glucose normally and blood glucose levels are above normal. Glucose is important because its the bodys main source of fuel. Glucose is a form of sugar in the blood; when food is eaten, its broken down into glucose and passes into the bloodstream, where it provides energy. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, is essential for the bodys process of using fuel, or glucose: blood cells need insulin to take up glucose. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas produces too little or no insulin or their blood cells do not respond effectively to insulin. As a result of insufficient insulin production or ineffective use, glucose builds up in the blood and, instead of being used as fuel, is passed out of the body in urine. In other words, the body loses its main source of fuel. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Its also known as insulin-dependent diabetes. Five to 10 percent of diagnosed diabetes in the United States is type 1. In autoimmune diseases, the bodys immune system (which normally fights infection) functions abnormally and attacks a part of the body. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas (beta cells) that produce insulin. As a result, a person with type 1 diabetes produces little or no insulin. He or she must take insulin daily to live. The exact causes of type 1 diabetes are still not known. Researchers suspect that causes include autoimmune, genetic, and environmental factors; viruses may also be involved. Though type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it most often appears in children and young adults. Men and women have equal incidence of type 1 diabetes. It can occur at any age, though it most often develops in child Continue reading >>

Magazines | Store From The American Diabetes Association

Magazines | Store From The American Diabetes Association

Clinical Diabetesprovides primary care physicians and other health care professionals with information on advances and state-of-the-art care for people with diabetes.Each issue contains one or more feature articles on the latest trends and innovations in diabetes care and treatment, as well as mini-reviews of landmark studies, practical treatment pointers, and best practices related to diabetes care. Continue reading >>

Special Report: Managing Diabetes

Special Report: Managing Diabetes

Diabetes has reached virtually epidemic levels in the modern world. In 2005 the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that about 7 percent of the American population (20.9 million people) had diabetes--and 6.2 million of them were unaware of it. More than 1.5 million people over the age of 20 will be diagnosed with it in the U.S. this year. About 21 percent of those older than 60 have the disease. Small wonder, then, given the severe complications associated with diabetes, that it continues to be the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. And although diabetes was often called a disease of affluence in the past, it is now one of the fastest-rising health concerns in developing nations as well: the World Health Organization pegs the global total at more than 171 million cases. An unfortunate catch-22 of diabetes is that although the right diet and exercise can help with its prevention and management, diabetes itself can complicate both eating and physical activity. Patients may need to pay extra attention to taking meals on a regular schedule and to monitoring how exercise dehydrates them or lowers their blood glucose. Some may fail to comply consistently with prescribed regimens that seem inconvenient or unpleasant, thereby raising their risk of complications. But thanks to leaps in science's understanding of the disease, doctors now wield a diverse and growing arsenal of drugs and management technologies to fight the progression--and even onset--of illness. People with diabetes have more and better options than ever before for enjoying healthy, active, long lives. Background Diabetes is a disease in which too much of a sugar called glucose accumulates in the blood because of a breakdown in how the body makes or reacts to the hormone insulin. Insul Continue reading >>

Step 1: Learn About Diabetes

Step 1: Learn About Diabetes

Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents If you are living with diabetes or have a loved one with the disease, it's important to work together to manage diabetes to stay healthy and prevent complications. Managing diabetes is not easy, but support from family members can make it much easier. The NDEP has resources for making healthy lifestyle choices that not only help people with diabetes manage the disease, but also help keep the whole family healthy! Here are four key steps to help you control your diabetes and live a long, active life. Diabetes means that your blood glucose (blood sugar) is too high. There are two main types of diabetes. the body does not make insulin. Insulin helps the body use glucose from food for energy. People with type 1 need to take insulin every day. the body does not make or use insulin well. People with type 2 often need to take pills and or insulin. Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes. may occur when a woman is pregnant. Gestational diabetes raises her risk of getting another type of diabetes, mostly type 2, for the rest of her life. It also raises her child's risk of being overweight and getting diabetes. You may have heard people say they have "a touch of diabetes" or "your sugar is a little high." These words suggest that diabetes is not a serious disease. That is not correct. Diabetes is serious, but you can learn to manage it! All people with diabetes need to make healthy food choices, stay at a healthy weight, and be physically active every day. Taking good care of yourself and your diabetes can help you feel better. It may help you avoid health problems caused by diabetes, such as: eye problems that can lead to trouble seeing or going blind. nerve damage that can cause your hands and feet to feel numb.Some people may even Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Have Five Separate Types, Not Two, Study Says | Time

Diabetes May Have Five Separate Types, Not Two, Study Says | Time

For many years, diabetes cases have largely been classified as either type 1 or type 2. But a new study suggests that there may actually be five different types of the disease—some of which may be more dangerous than others. A new classification system could help doctors identify the people most at risk for complications, the study authors say, and could pave the way for more personalized and effective treatments. The research article, published in The Lancet: Diabetes & Endocrinology , calls attention to the need for an updated diabetes classification system. The current system “has not been much updated during the past 20 years,” the authors wrote in their paper, “and very few attempts have been made to explore heterogeneity of type 2 diabetes”—despite calls from expert groups over the years to do so. Meanwhile, they wrote, diabetes is the fastest-increasing disease worldwide, and existing treatments have been unable to stem the tide or prevent the development of chronic complications in many patients. One explanation, they say, is that diabetes diagnosis is based on only one measurement—how the body metabolizes glucose—when the disease is actually much more complex, and much more individual. Currently, diabetes is classified based mainly on age of diagnosis (younger people often have type 1) and on the presence or absence of antibodies that attack beta cells, which release insulin. People with type 1 diabetes have these antibodies—and therefore cannot make insulin on their own—while people with type 2 do not. Their bodies make insulin but don’t use it the right way. Based on these criteria, between 75% and 85% of people with diabetes are classified with type 2, the authors wrote in their paper. A third subgroup of diabetes, known as latent auto Continue reading >>

Healthy Recipes Diabetes Recipe Magazine - Aha | Shop Heart

Healthy Recipes Diabetes Recipe Magazine - Aha | Shop Heart

If you live, or anyone in your family lives, with diabetes, you'll appreciate this Diabetes Recipe Magazine for discovering new tasty meals low in saturated fats, sugars and sodium. This Heart-Healthy Recipes for People with Diabetes Recipe Magazine includes 37 diabetic recipes along with nutritional information, all approved by the American Heart Association. Paperback. 52 pages and 25 full color photos. CUSTOMERS WHO BOUGHT THIS ITEM ALSO BOUGHT Continue reading >>

Dying To Take Type 2 Diabetes Seriously

Dying To Take Type 2 Diabetes Seriously

Switch on the television or flip through a magazine and you’re likely to see an ad about diabetes. While it’s good to know treatment breakthroughs abound, it’s important to focus on ways to avoid getting diabetes in the first place. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States. A person diagnosed at age 50 dies, on average, six years earlier than someone without diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). It’s time to get serious about this deadly disease! ONE IN THREE AMERICANS MAY EVENTUALLY DEVELOP DIABETES Based on current trends, the risk of getting diabetes is alarming. Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose (blood sugar) level is too high. Type 2 diabetes, where the body does not make or use insulin well, accounts for the vast majority of cases. Type 1 diabetes, usually diagnosed in children and young adults, only accounts for around five percent. What’s causing America’s type 2 diabetes epidemic? Generally speaking, it’s due to the usual life-threatening suspects—inactivity, being overweight, unhealthy food choices, and aging. STACK THE DECK IN YOUR FAVOR The earlier you make changes through weight loss, a healthful diet, and regular exercise to avoid, slow down, or reverse type 2 diabetes, the better. Always check with your doctor before beginning any diet or exercise regimen. GET YOUR MOVE ON Working your muscles more often and making them work harder not only burns calories, it improves the muscle’s ability to use insulin and absorb glucose. Both aerobic and strength training exercises are recommended. Not sure where to start? Try brisk walking at a fast pace to raise the heart rate, and strength training, which builds muscle mass. Studies show beneficial effects when people with diabetes par Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Prediabetes?

Are You At Risk For Prediabetes?

Working as a physical therapist in Talent, Oregon, Jade Wilcoxson treated diabetic patients every day, but she never imagined she could become one of them. At 28, she had an athletic build, loved to mountain bike and play soccer on weekends, and ate what she considered a pretty healthy diet. So in 2006, she was shocked when she got a call from her doctor's office after having blood work done during a routine checkup. "My blood sugar was elevated," recalls Jade, now 36. Her doctor retested her a few times, but the results were conclusive: Jade had prediabetes, a condition that put her at higher risk for type 2 diabetes, a disease in which the body doesn't properly make or use insulin, the hormone that helps convert glucose into fuel for our cells. As a result, blood sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can damage nerves and organs. A prediabetes diagnosis means that has already begun to happen. Exactly why isn't known, but genetics, excess body fat and inactivity play a role. Jade was devastated. She knew that if she got diabetes, she would be at an increased risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The good news: Prediabetes is reversible. She could clean up her diet, as her doctor suggested, cutting back on simple carbs and alcohol, and step up her exercise routine and/or take drugs to manage her glucose levels. "I worried that if I started taking medication I would become dependent on it," Jade says. "I wasn't ready to go down that route." She called her brother, Ryan, who suggested they train for a 100-mile bicycle race together as a way to exercise more consistently. "It took us about eight or nine hours to cross the finish line, but we made it," Jade says. Inspired, she kept training. "Once I started riding, I felt like eating bette Continue reading >>

Free Diabetes Magazines!

Free Diabetes Magazines!

Take advantage of our online archive of Costco’s Healthy Living With Diabetes magazines today! Each issue is packed with Diabetes and health-related information, along with healthy recipes that we’re sure your family and friends will love. All the magazines from 2012 onward can be found in the magazine archives section. Note that the magazines published in 2012 and 2013 can be downloaded for offline viewing at any time. Simply view the magazine in your browser, then click on the PDF button at the top of the viewer. For your convenience, we’re listing them all below, from 2012 to 2015: Continue reading >>

Diabetes Forecast Magazine

Diabetes Forecast Magazine

Published by the American Diabetes Association, Diabetes Forecast magazine seeks to provide accurate, timely and friendly information about all aspects of living with diabetes or pre-diabetes, including treatment, food, fitness, weight loss, medications, research and well-being for the entire family. All articles are reviewed by a dedicated group of healthcare professionals with clinical and/or research experience. Diabetes Forecast readers also enjoy the real-life stories and reader-submitted content that are part of the editorial mix. Each bi-monthly issue of Diabetes Forecast magazine contains the following regular sections: Recipes, an assortment of healthy meal ideas; Features, in-depth articles that provide timely information to diabetics and their loved ones; Your Food, healthy food and meal prep ideas; Your Health, articles focused on this unique health condition; Discovery, a look into current research, treatments and forecasts; Your ADA, news and updates from the American Diabetes Association, the world's most trusted source of diabetes information; and Voices and Views, opinion and educational letters and briefs. Diabetes Forecast may publish special issues throughout the year, such as the Summer Food issue, the Consumer Guide issue, the People to Know issue and the Holiday Food issue. People living with diabetes or pre-diabetes who are actively seeking ways to live healthier, happier and longer while managing their condition will benefit from a subscription to Diabetes Forecast magazine. Continue reading >>

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