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Diabetes Machine

How Does A Continuous Glucose Monitor Work?

How Does A Continuous Glucose Monitor Work?

Glucose meters are a great tool, but sometimes you need to keep a closer eye on your blood sugar levels. That's where a device called a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) can help. This FDA-approved system tracks your blood sugar levels day and night. It collects readings automatically every 5 to 15 minutes. It can help detect trends and patterns that give you and your doctor a more complete picture of your diabetes. The data can help you find ways to better manage your condition. Several devices are available for adults and children. You need a prescription from your doctor to get one. CGM measures the amount of glucose in the fluid inside your body. Different devices collect the information in different manners using tiny sensors. In some cases, the sensor is placed under the skin of your belly in a quickly and painless fashion or, it can be adhered to the back of your arm. A transmitter on the sensor then sends the information to a wireless-pager-like monitor that you can clip on your belt. The monitor displays your sugar levels at 1-, 5-, 10-, or 15-minute intervals. If your sugar drops to a dangerously low level or a high preset level, the monitor will sound an alarm. In the past, only doctors could see the readings CGM systems collected. Now anyone can use the devices as part of at-home diabetes care. You can download data on your computer, tablet, or smartphone to see patterns and trends in your sugar levels. The information can help you and your doctor make the best plan for managing your diabetes, including: The number of meals and snacks you need each day CGM doesn’t replace traditional home monitors. You’ll still need to measure your blood sugar with a regular glucose meter a few times a day to help the monitor stay accurate. Most monitors still require a f Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter

Glucose Meter

Four generations of blood glucose meter, c. 1993–2005. Sample sizes vary from 30 to 0.3 μl. Test times vary from 5 seconds to 2 minutes (modern meters typically provide results in 5 seconds). A glucose meter is a medical device for determining the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. It can also be a strip of glucose paper dipped into a substance and measured to the glucose chart. It is a key element of home blood glucose monitoring (HBGM) by people with diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemia. A small drop of blood, obtained by pricking the skin with a lancet, is placed on a disposable test strip that the meter reads and uses to calculate the blood glucose level. The meter then displays the level in units of mg/dl or mmol/l. Since approximately 1980, a primary goal of the management of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been achieving closer-to-normal levels of glucose in the blood for as much of the time as possible, guided by HBGM several times a day. The benefits include a reduction in the occurrence rate and severity of long-term complications from hyperglycemia as well as a reduction in the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia. History[edit] Leland Clark presented his first paper about the oxygen electrode, later named the Clark electrode, on 15 April 1956, at a meeting of the American Society for Artificial Organs during the annual meetings of the Federated Societies for Experimental Biology.[1][2] In 1962, Clark and Ann Lyons from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital developed the first glucose enzyme electrode. This biosensor was based on a thin layer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on an oxygen electrode. Thus, the readout was the amount of oxygen consumed by GOx during the enzymatic reaction with the substra Continue reading >>

Top 5 Smallest Blood Glucose Meters

Top 5 Smallest Blood Glucose Meters

Tweet One of the benefits of technology is that clever things can come in surprisingly small packages - meaning blood glucose meters are getting smaller. Many of today’s blood sugar meters are small, discreet and easy to use. Most blood test meters do the basics and do them well - almost all meters on the market have fast test-times, small blood sample requirements and downloadable results. The smallest meters For many people, the blood test machine they choose is down to what they are familiar with. Some people stick with the same manufacturer, some like to adopt the latest technology such as Contour USB and some people just listen to what their healthcare team recommends. For many people however, having something portable, light and preferably pocket-sized is high on the agenda. For that reason, we've selected the top 5 smallest blood glucose meters on the market in the UK. Many of the meters are very recent - with some, including the Contour NEXT USB and Accu-Chek Mobile, leading the way in terms of innovation. 1. Abbott Diabetes Care Freestyle The Abbott Diabetes Care Freestyle Lite is a stylish, discreet blood glucose meter. An easy-to-use machine, there is no coding required to make it work. Sometimes referred to as a micro-meter or a mini meter, it fits into the palm of the hand, with room to spare while the screen is actually quote a big part of the design (good for kids and adults alike). The hole you put the test strip in has a dash of yellow to help you load the strip into the right place while its rubber ‘bum’ means the meter won’t slide about while you’re using it. Abbott Diabetes Care Freestyle review 2. Bayer's Contour NEXT USB From Bayer, the Contour USB was released in 2010 and holds a rather whopping 2,000 test results. The point is to make i Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitors: What Factors Affect Accuracy?

Blood Glucose Monitors: What Factors Affect Accuracy?

Sometimes my blood glucose monitor seems to give incorrect readings. What can I do to make sure the measurement is accurate? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. When used correctly, blood glucose monitors — small devices that measure and display your blood sugar level — are usually accurate. But occasionally they may be incorrect. Consider these factors that affect meter accuracy and the steps to resolve or prevent the problem: Factors that affect accuracy Solutions Test strip problems Throw out damaged or outdated test strips. Store strips in their sealed container; keep them away from heat, moisture and humidity. Be sure the strips are meant for your specific glucose meter. Extreme temperatures Keep your glucose meter and test strips at room temperature. Alcohol, dirt or other substances on your skin Wash and dry your hands and the testing site thoroughly before pricking your skin. Improper coding Some meters must be coded to each container of test strips. Be sure the code number in the device matches the code number on the test strip container. Monitor problems Fully insert the test strip into the monitor. Replace the monitor batteries as needed. Not enough blood applied to the test strip Touch a generous drop of blood to the test strip. Don't add more blood to the test strip after the first drop is applied. Testing site location If you're using a site other than your fingertip and you think the reading is wrong, test again using blood from a fingertip. Blood samples from alternate sites aren't as accurate as fingertip samples when your blood sugar level is rising or falling quickly. The amount of red blood cells in your blood If you are dehydrated or your red blood cell count is low (anemia), your test results may be less accurate. Blood glucose monitor quality Continue reading >>

Machine Learning For Managing Diabetes: 5 Current Use Cases

Machine Learning For Managing Diabetes: 5 Current Use Cases

Machine Learning for Managing Diabetes: 5 Current Use Cases See more articles like this one in the following categories Diabetes is a leading chronic disease that affects more than 30 million people in the United States. The disease results from high blood glucose (blood sugar) due to an inability to properly derive energy from food, primarily in the form of glucose. Insulin is a hormone that normally helps process glucose in the body. However, in the case of diabetes, insulin is inadequate (Type 2 diabetes) or obsolete (Type 1 diabetes). The economic impact of diabetes is estimated at $105 billion , according to a study published in 2016 and led by researchers from Imperial College London, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the World Health Organization. Managing diabetes normally involves a commitment to a healthy lifestyle, routine checking of blood sugar levels and adherence to a medication regimen. Today, machine learning is emerging in an effort to improve the quality of life for diabetics. Some of the questions business leaders are asking today related to the role of machine learning in managing diabetes include: What types of AI applications are currently used to manage diabetes? How has the market responded to these AI applications? Are there any common trends among these innovation efforts and how could these trends possibly contribute to reducing the rates of people living with diabetes? The majority of AI use-cases for managing diabetes appear to fall into three major categories: Glucose Monitoring Systems: Machine learning algorithms help automate the process of monitoring blood sugar levels and recommend adjustments in care. Nutrition Coaching: To help recommend meal options based on the specific diet criteria of the user. Early Diagnosis Tools Continue reading >>

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

Source:Supplied AUSTRALIAN adults with diabetes now have the option of using a new glucose monitoring device, which eliminates the need for regular finger pricking. The system, which has been available in Europe for several years, involves a small sensor the size of a 20 cent coin worn on the upper arm for 14 days. Many diabetics have to draw blood and test their blood glucose levels up to 12 times a day. Instead of doing that, they can now scan the sensor and get a reading in less than a second. The Abbotts FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System also displays an eight-hour history and a trend arrow showing the direction the glucose is heading. The device will make life easier for people living with diabetes who use insulin, whether type 1 or type 2, said Diabetes Australia spokeswoman Renza Scibilia. Source:Supplied “Finger pricking is painful, inconvenient and intrusive, which is often why people don’t check their levels as often as they ideally should,” she told news.com.au. “It’s very different from just wearing a device on your arm and scanning it.” The disposable, water-resistant sensor needs to be replaced every 14 days and costs $95, while the reader is the same price. The Freestyle Libre can be purchased online via the official website. Ashley Ng, 26, from Melbourne, has been testing the device for two weeks and is a big fan. “I didn’t realise how much a burden finger-pricking was until I stopped,” Ms Ng told news.com.au. “Normally I’d prick myself 6-10 times a day. It’s something that I’ve always lived with and gotten used to, and now I don’t have to do it. She said she felt no pain when inserting the sensor into her arm. “The first couple of days I was like ‘Is this for real?’ I was feeling really great. My fingers f Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

With Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), you get a more complete picture of your glucose levels, which can lead to better treatment decisions and better glucose control. Without diabetes, your body tracks glucose levels all day and night to ensure the right amount of insulin is released at the right time. To successfully manage diabetes, a monitoring system is needed to consistently check your glucose levels. The most common glucose monitoring solutions are blood glucose meters and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems. Sensor overtape not shown in depiction How Does CGM Work? CGM is a way to measure glucose levels in real-time throughout the day and night. A tiny electrode called a glucose sensor is inserted under the skin to measure glucose levels in tissue fluid. It is connected to a transmitter that sends the information via wireless radio frequency to a monitoring and display device. The device can detect and notify you if your glucose is reaching a high or low limit. The latest Medtronic CGM systems can actually alert you before you reach your glucose limits. CGM systems usually consist of a glucose sensor, a transmitter, and a small external monitor to view your glucose levels. MiniMed insulin pumps have built-in CGM so the information can be conveniently seen on your pump screen. The CGM monitor or insulin pump is small, discreet, and easy-to-wear. It can be attached to your belt, hidden in your pocket, or placed under your clothing. This component will show your current glucose levels and your historical glucose trends. It also notifies you before you reach your low or high glucose limits and if your glucose level rises or falls too quickly. The CGM transmitter is a small, lightweight device that attaches to the glucose sensor, gathers your glucose data, Continue reading >>

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Everyone with diabetes should test their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. Knowing the results lets you tweak your strategy for keeping the disease in check, as needed. Regular testing can also help you avoid getting long-term health problems that can stem from the condition. Research shows that in people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, sticking to your target blood sugar and HbA1c levels makes complications less likely. 1. Traditional Home Glucose Monitoring You prick your finger with a lancet (a small, sharp needle), put a drop of blood on a test strip, and then place the strip into a meter that displays your blood sugar levels. Meters vary in features, portability, speed, size, cost, and readability (with larger displays or spoken instructions if you have vision problems). Devices deliver results in less than 15 seconds and store this information for future use. Some meters also calculate an average blood sugar level over a span of time. Some also feature software kits that take information from the meter and display graphs and charts of your past test results. Blood sugar meters and strips are available at your local pharmacy. 2. Meters That Test Other Parts of Your Body. Some devices let you test you upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. These results may differ from the blood sugar levels gotten from a fingertip stick. Levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly. This is especially true when your sugar is changing fast, like after a meal or after exercise. If you have symptoms of low blood sugar, don’t rely on test results from other parts of your body. 3. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Some of these devices are combined with insulin pumps. They're not as accurate as finger-stick glucose results. But they can help you find p Continue reading >>

How Can I Find Out If My Glucose Monitor Kit Is Accurate?

How Can I Find Out If My Glucose Monitor Kit Is Accurate?

So the first thing you need to know about meter accuracy, is that they are not accurate at all, even when they are working perfectly. Currently, here in the States, a meter only needs to be within 20% of a lab value for FDA approval. To put that into some kind of perspective, consider the following: • If your blood sugar is 100 mg/dL your meter could read anywhere between 80 and 120. • If your blood sugar is 200 mg/dL your meter could read anywhere between 160 and 240. • If your blood sugar is 300 mg/dL your meter could read anywhere between 240 and 360. • If your blood sugar is 400 mg/dL your meter could read anywhere between 320 and 480, a one hundred and sixty point spread. Now, none of this was meant to depress you. Test strips are getting better and better, especially the ones from the big names in the business such as OneTouch and FreeStyle. WaveSense strips are also frighteningly good too. But what I want you to understand is that if you test a single drop of blood with two strips in a row, you will not get the same answer each time—and that doesn’t mean something is wrong with your meter. Most meters come with a vial of test solution, which is fake blood with a set amount of sugar in it. You can use the test solution to make sure your meter is working within the normal operating range. You simply take a test just like you would test your blood sugar, but instead of lancing you finger and testing your blood you put a drop of test solution on the tip of your finger and test it. Each vial of test strips will have a range of expected results printed on it. So long as the test you took falls within those numbers, the meter is working normally. One important note, however, is that about half the meters available need to be coded to match each batch of test Continue reading >>

Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them To Manage Your Diabetes

Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them To Manage Your Diabetes

Checking your blood sugar, also called blood glucose, is an important part of diabetes care. This tip sheet tells you: why it helps you to know your blood sugar numbers how to check your blood sugar levels what are target blood sugar levels what to do if your levels are too low or too high how to pay for these tests Why do I need to know my blood sugar numbers? Your blood sugar numbers show how well your diabetes is managed. And managing your diabetes means that you have less chance of having serious health problems, such as kidney disease and vision loss. As you check your blood sugar, you can see what makes your numbers go up and down. For example, you may see that when you are stressed or eat certain foods, your numbers go up. And, you may see that when you take your medicine and are active, your numbers go down. This information lets you know what is working for you and what needs to change. How is blood sugar measured? There are two ways to measure blood sugar. Blood sugar checks that you do yourself. These tell you what your blood sugar level is at the time you test. The A1C (A-one-C) is a test done in a lab or at your provider’s office. This test tells you your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months. How do I check my blood sugar? You use a blood glucose meter to check your blood sugar. This device uses a small drop of blood from your finger to measure your blood sugar level. You can get the meter and supplies in a drug store or by mail. Read the directions that come with your meter to learn how to check your blood sugar. Your health care team also can show you how to use your meter. Write the date, time, and result of the test in your blood sugar record. Take your blood sugar record and meter to each visit and talk about your results with your h Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Choosing A Glucose Meter

Choosing A Glucose Meter

Blood glucose meters are small, computerized devices that measure and display your blood glucose level. These devices are mainly used by people with diabetes. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose level provides you and your doctors with valuable information about how food, exercise, medications, stress, and other factors affect your blood glucose. This information will help you and your doctor construct a treatment plan tailored to your needs. Many types of blood glucose meters are available for at-home use, from basic models that only read blood glucose levels, to more advanced versions that offer features such as memory for storing information. The cost of blood glucose meters and testing supplies varies, and insurance may not always provide coverage. Study all options before picking out a meter, and if you have insurance, check which meter your insurance covers. Consider up-front costs, such as how much the actual meter costs, and long-term costs, such as how expensive testing strips and other supplies are. Then, work with your doctor and learn how to properly use your meter. Whether this is your first blood glucose meter or you’ve used one for several years and are looking for an upgrade, there are several questions you should ask yourself before you begin looking: Does your doctor or nurse suggest a specific meter? These people have a wealth of experience with an array of meters and can guide you in a good direction. What does your insurance cover? Your insurance company may have a list of preapproved meters it covers. Also, make sure to find out if and how your insurance will cover the cost of testing strips and supplies. How much will this meter cost you? Some meters can be costly and insurance companies don’t always make allowances for pricier Continue reading >>

Diabetes Testing Machine

Diabetes Testing Machine

You are here: Home / Health Issues / Diabetes Testing Machine Diabetes treatment is made possible by constantly monitoring blood sugar levels. Diabetic patients can do this at home with a diabetes testing machine or blood glucose meter that measures glucose levels in the blood. How often you need to check your blood sugar depends on your particular diabetes treatment and how well the condition is controlled. People with type 1 diabetes who take insulin may need to check their blood glucose level several times during the day, in which case a diabetes testing machine would come in handy. The diabetes testing machine is also called a glucometer. Modern glucometers are now small enough to fit in the palm of your hand. Diabetes testing machines come with test strips, calibration solution and alcohol wipes. They can be stowed in their cases, making it easy to bring them with you when you travel. To test for your blood sugar level, a very small amount of blood is taken from your finger. Almost all glucometers use a test strip to absorb the blood droplet for the machine to analyze. The machine comes with a lancet device that makes a small incision in the finger to draw blood for testing. Older models of diabetes testing machines took up to a full minute to analyze the blood sample, but newer models can get a reading in a matter of seconds. Newer models are also more sensitive and require only the tiniest amount of blood sample to get an accurate reading. Thus, it is possible to use a smaller lancet and reduce the discomfort of obtaining a blood sample. Many modern glucometers these days are capable of recording up to 250 blood sugar readings, including the date and time when the reading was made. This feature allows you to keep track of your blood sugar levels for trending. Th Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

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