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Diabetes Lips Tingling

Tingling Tongue: Symptoms & Signs

Tingling Tongue: Symptoms & Signs

Numbness or tingling ("pins and needles") sensations in the tongue, medically known as paresthesia of the tongue, most commonly occur due to damage to the nervous system. The medical term for the absence of sensation is anesthesia. Damage to the lingual nerve that supplies the tongue has been reported as a complication of dental procedures or surgery, such as wisdom tooth extraction, implants, or root canal procedures. Other conditions that damage the nervous system, like multiple sclerosis, as well as brain conditions such as stroke, can also cause numbness and tingling of the tongue. Sometimes, these sensations extend to involve the lips and/or jaws. Tingling of the tongue associated with nerve damage can occur both before and after eating. REFERENCES: Chan, H.L., D.J. Leong, J.H. Fu, C.Y. Yeh, N. Tatarakis, H.L. Wang. "The Significance of the Lingual Nerve During Periodontal/Implant Surgery." J Periodontol. 81.3 Mar. 2010:372-377. Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

Tingling In Hands And Feet: Symptoms & Signs

Tingling In Hands And Feet: Symptoms & Signs

Tingling in the hands and feet is often associated with other symptoms like pain, burning, or numbness in the hands and feet. These type of sensations commonly reflect damage to the nerves in the area (neuropathy); because these are peripheral areas of the body, the term peripheral neuropathy is used to refer to this type of symptom. Peripheral neuropathy has a number of causes and varies in severity among affected people. Vitamin deficiency, diabetes, and kidney failure are among the medical causes of tingling in the hands and feet due to nerve damage. Taking certain medications can also cause tingling in the hands and feet. Other potential causes of peripheral neuropathy include autoimmune diseases, toxins, alcoholism, and infections. REFERENCES: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. United States. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. "Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet." Dec. 18, 2014. . Continue reading >>

What Causes A Tingling Tongue?

What Causes A Tingling Tongue?

Is this cause for concern? Your tongue is feeling weird. It’s tingling, giving you a sort of pins-and-needles sensation in your mouth. At the same time, it might also feel a little numb. Should you be worried? Probably not. A tingling tongue often isn’t anything to worry about and will probably go away by itself soon. There are many reasons for a tingling tongue. One possibility is a condition known as primary Raynaud’s phenomenon, a disorder that usually affects the blood flow to your fingers, toes, and less often to your lips and tongue. When your tongue gets cold or you’re under stress, the small arteries and veins that carry blood to it get narrower. In primary Raynaud’s phenomenon, this reaction is exaggerated and the blood flow to the area is temporarily reduced. This causes your tongue to change color and look blue, very red, or very pale. During or after the episode, your tongue may tingle for a short time. Primary Raynaud’s can be annoying, but it’s not dangerous. There’s no known cause and it doesn’t mean you have a serious health problem. If you have tongue symptoms, they will almost always go away if you drink something warm or relax to relieve your stress. Primary Raynaud’s usually causes repeat episodes. If you notice color changes to your tongue that are temporary, take a picture to share with your doctor so that they can confirm your diagnosis. It’s important to make sure you’re not experiencing secondary Raynaud’s. Secondary Raynaud’s is a related disorder that causes similar symptoms, but it’s often caused by an underlying health problem with the immune system, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or scleroderma. Sometimes tongue numbness or tingling can be a sign of a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA). TIAs are Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

The symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop very quickly (over a few days or weeks), particularly in children. In older adults, the symptoms can often take longer to develop (a few months). However, they should disappear when you start taking insulin and the condition is under control. The main symptoms of diabetes are: feeling very thirsty urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk itchiness around the genital area, or regular bouts of thrush (a yeast infection) blurred vision caused by the lens of your eye changing shape slow healing of cuts and grazes Vomiting or heavy, deep breathing can also occur at a later stage. This is a dangerous sign and requires immediate admission to hospital for treatment. See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. When to seek urgent medical attention You should seek urgent medical attention if you have diabetes and develop: a loss of appetite nausea or vomiting a high temperature stomach pain fruity smelling breath – which may smell like pear drops or nail varnish (others will usually be able to smell it, but you won't) Hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) If you have diabetes, your blood glucose levels can become very low. This is known as hypoglycaemia (or a "hypo"), and it's triggered when injected insulin in your body moves too much glucose out of your bloodstream. In most cases, hypoglycaemia occurs as a result of taking too much insulin, although it can also develop if you skip a meal, exercise very vigorously or drink alcohol on an empty stomach. Symptoms of a "hypo" include: feeling shaky and irritable sweating tingling lips feeling weak feeling confused hunger nausea (feeling sick) A hypo can be brought under control simply by eating or drinking somethin Continue reading >>

Burning Mouth Syndrome And Diabetes

Burning Mouth Syndrome And Diabetes

Diana Tosuni-O'Neill RDH, BS Have you ever felt like your mouth was on fire? This painful sensation can make you feel as if you've scalded your mouth, and can spread to your tongue, gums, lips and inside of your cheeks. According to the Mayo Clinic, this condition is called burning mouth syndrome — it has no visible signs, and it can last from months to years. We do now know that burning mouth syndrome and diabetes can be related, so it's easier to diagnose and treat in diabetics. And it doesn't have to be a life sentence. Here are the common causes of burning mouth syndrome and how to treat them. Possible Causes There are many causes of burning mouth syndrome, and some people, such as diabetics and postmenopausal women, are more likely to suffer from it. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), the most common causes include the following: Damage to nerves controlling oral senses such as taste Hormonal changes Nutritional deficiencies Fungal infections in the mouth Acid reflux Dentures that don't fit properly Anxiety and depression With so many possible causes, it's often difficult to clinically point out the culprit in many cases. People with uncontrolled or marginally controlled diabetes can usually narrow down the most probable causes to dry mouth, oral thrush and sometimes neurological abnormalities. Neuropathy (when nerve damage or weakness occurs to the hands and feet) may lead to oral tingling, burning or pain caused by changes in the nerves within the oral region as well. Symptoms and Treatments Moderate to severe burning in the mouth is one of the main symptoms of this disorder. For many people, the burning sensation begins in late morning, builds to a peak by evening, and often subsides at night. Some feel the pain co Continue reading >>

Tingling Lips And Tongue

Tingling Lips And Tongue

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I am experiencing tingling lips and tongue just about all day, every day. It is driving me nuts. All the research I have done shows tingling lips and tongue to be a symptom of going low. Well, here I am two hours after dinner, my BG is 110, never saw it go higher than 115 and I am tingling. My BG rarely seems to go below 90 anymore, fasting BG is between 90 and 110, usually close to 100. The tingling occurs about half an hour after I eat and can last all dang day. I had bacon for breakfast with a glass of milk laced with cinnamon. I had breast of chicken for lunch with brocolli in a sauce. I had black-eyed peas with bacon for dinner, one bowl, with a glass of milk laced with cinnamon. All in all a pretty low carb day. The only thing I can think of is that my body thinks I am going low and tingles. It doesn't seem to matter if I've gone high with my BG or not, when the numbers start to go down, the tingling begins. I am 43 and was diagnosed with diabetes (type 2) 8/16/06. I am on 1000mg of metformin twice a day (total of 2000mg). I initially lost weight, exercised and brought my BS way down. Fasting BS was 255 at diagnosis, was recently down to a fasting 89. A1c was 12.5 at diagnosis, now down to 5.7. Insulin was measured at 27 when diagnosed, down to 14 (want it below 10). I have lost some weight and have been very good about exercising and watching what I eat, though I haven't been too awfully good between Thanksgiving and Christmas. cinnamon in milk twice per day, sometimes Sublingual B12, Folic Acid and Biotin vitamin pill I can't tell a real difference in my BG if I take cinnamon or not, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia can be a very serious condition, with extreme cases causing seizures, coma, and even death. It occurs when blood sugar levels drop too low, and it is most often experienced by people with diabetes. As you learn about diabetes management, being well versed in low blood sugar symptoms will enable you to detect the signs of impending hypoglycemia and act quickly to head it off or minimize its impact. Diabetes Type and Hypoglycemia Risk Hypoglycemia risk varies across the three different types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia most often, as their diabetes management often requires a lot of attention and careful planning. The average person with type 1 diabetes who is attempting aggressive disease control may still experience low blood sugar symptoms frequently, and a full-blown case of hypoglycemia will require close medical attention. "When it comes to type 1 diabetes, the body can't make insulin on its own, so it must be administered," notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, Everyday Health contributor and author of Belly Fat for Dummies. Paying close attention to your diet is important, too. "If the correct amount of insulin is given based on the amount of carbohydrates consumed, blood sugar levels can remain in a healthy range." Type 2 Diabetes These patients experience hypoglycemia less frequently than people with type 1 diabetes; the rate of hypoglycemia for type 2 diabetes patients taking insulin is about one-third that of type 1 diabetes patients. But research shows that the frequency of hypoglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes increases as the disease becomes more advanced. "In people with type 2 diabetes, the body may produce adequate insulin, yet the cells are resistant to it, making the insulin ineffecti Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Why a Short List Is Not Enough Hypoglycemia is a common side effect of using insulin, and it can also occur in people who take pills that cause the pancreas to release more insulin. Pills that have this effect include the oral drugs chlorpropamide (brand name Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), tolbutamide (Orinase), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, and Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL), glimepiride (Amaryl), combination drugs that contain glyburide, glipizide, or glimepiride (such as Glucovance, Metaglip, Avandaryl, and Duetact), repaglinide (Prandin), combination drugs that contain repaglinide (Prandimet), and nateglinide (Starlix). It is therefore important that anyone who uses one of these drugs know what causes hypoglycemia, how to prevent it, how to recognize it, and how to treat it. Often, however, the most education a person receives on the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia is a handout listing its 10 most common symptoms. This is particularly true for adults. But, as any longtime user of insulin will tell you, such a list does not go far enough in describing how those common symptoms can feel, and it misses some important, albeit not-so-common, symptoms of hypoglycemia. This article attempts to fill in some of the blanks by describing what those common symptoms really feel like — in a variety of situations, including driving and sleeping — and by describing some less common symptoms. Once you (and your friends, coworkers, and family members) are better equipped to recognize hypoglycemia, you will be able treat low blood glucose faster and avert more severe hypoglycemia and its sometimes serious consequences. What is hypoglycemia Low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia, is a condition in which the brain does not have enough glucose to carry out its many Continue reading >>

Is Numbness And Tingling In The Lips And Tongue Related To Diabetes?

Is Numbness And Tingling In The Lips And Tongue Related To Diabetes?

Question Originally asked by Community Member deb Is Numbness And Tingling In The Lips And Tongue Related To Diabetes? I have diabetes and wonder if the numbness and tingling in my lips and tongue could be a result of low blood sugar? Someone told me it could also be a sign of fibromyalgia. Does anyone know if that’s true? Answer Deb- Yes tingle in your lips and tongue could be caused by low blood sugar levels. If you are experiencing this you may want to test your blood sugar levels. You may also consider talking to your physician, since that’s the best way to know if your diabetes is under control. It’s important to keep on top of something like that, so we look forward to hearing how your appointment goes. Good luck! Cherise Community Moderator You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cherise Nicole Continue reading >>

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

Across the board, a low blood sugar seems to be considered as anything under 70 mg/dL. Revisiting the American Diabetes Association’s website this morning offers up a list of symptoms of low blood sugar, like: Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills and clamminess Irritability or impatience Confusion, including delirium Rapid/fast heartbeat Lightheadedness or dizziness Hunger and nausea Sleepiness Blurred/impaired vision Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue Headaches Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness Lack of coordination Nightmares or crying out during sleep Seizures Unconsciousness (As with most diabetes-related lists on the Internet, the further down the list you read, the worse shit seems to get.) The “what happens if a low blood sugar goes untreated” answer is short, and to the point: “If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to a seizure or unconsciousness (passing out, a coma). In this case, someone else must take over.” When my daughter hears my Dexcom beeping, she understands the difference between the alert signaling a high blood sugar and the alert signaling a low. If the high alarm goes off, she doesn’t react, but if the low alarm goes off, she perks up immediately and asks me if I need a “glupose tab.” The immediacy and seriousness of low blood sugars is noticed by my three year old because she’s seen me go from normal, functional Mom to confused, sweaty, and tangled-in-my-own-words Mom in a matter of minutes. The symptoms of low blood sugars don’t just vary from PWD to PWD, but often vary within the PWD’s own lifetime. When I was very small, my low blood sugar “tell” was when my mouth would go numb and my face felt like I’d had Novocaine hours earlier and it was just starting to wear off, with th Continue reading >>

Numb Lips In Diabetes: Home Remedies For Tingling And Numbness In Lips

Numb Lips In Diabetes: Home Remedies For Tingling And Numbness In Lips

Diabetes is one of the most common diseases that strike both men and women, young and old. Symptoms of this disease can sometimes be hard to figure out unless a person has undergone several laboratory tests to confirm the presence of this disease in the body. These symptoms are caused by several factors including hyperventilation, peripheral neuropathy, hypoglycemia, and lip numbness in diabetes among others. Causes and Home Treatment of Lip Numbness in Diabetes Lip numbness is also often referred to as lip paresthesia. The term paresthesia is used in describing the feeling of numbness or tingling in the lips. A number of allergic responses can trigger the reaction of a patient resulting to lip numbness. Certain conditions that lead to abnormal feelings in the lips can just be symptoms of severity, as in the case of numb lips diabetes. Hyperventilation can also be one of the main causes of tingling lips numbness. Hyperventilation happens when there is a sudden heavy and rapid breathing happening to the body. Not only are the lips affected by hyperventilation, but also the hands and feet. Attacks of hyperventilation can happen along with painful muscle twitching. Peripheral neuropathy or sensory nerve damage can also be a factor of numb lips diabetes, tingling, pinching, or sudden pain. Generally, when a person is suffering from nerve damage, numbness sometimes begin in the feet moving up to the legs and can even result to difficulty in walking and keeping balance. Hypoglycemia can also be a cause for numbness in lips. It is usually rooted from several underlying diseases including diabetes. Hypoglycemia can lead to even serious complications if left untreated. Diagnostic tests are normally done to determine the levels of blood calcium and phosphate in the body. However, Continue reading >>

What Could Be Causing My Lips And Tongue To Feel Numb And Tingle?

What Could Be Causing My Lips And Tongue To Feel Numb And Tingle?

There are a few different reasons your lips and tongue may feel numb and tingly. If you take medication that you are allergic to, or if you have an allergic reaction to some kind of food, you may feel these sensations. And people who have migraines often report these symptoms, too. If you’re feeling numbness, pain or tingling in your face, that may be a sign of a mini stroke or stroke. Trinity Health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. In case of emergency call 911. This site is educational and not a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider. A numb lip and tongue that is not caused by a food or a medication could be nothing to worry about or it could be something serious. Generally speaking, anesthesia (total loss of sensation,) paresthesia (partial sensation, partial numbness, tingling) and dysesthesia (abnormal, bothersome sensation) is due to pressure on the nerve, impaired nerve function or nerve injury or destruction. If both areas, tongue and lip, are numb on one side of the mouth, pressure on the nerve can come from swelling of an abscessed tooth pressing on the main nerve to the lower jaw or from something more serious than a tooth. If both areas, tongue and lip, are numb on both sides of the mouth, the diagnosis could be impaired nerve function (e.g. diabetes or other neuropathies) or from something more serious. Nerve injury or destruction, in the absence of a history of injury, requires a medical diagnosis as soon as possible. My advice is to see your dentist or oral surgeon to rule out a dental or oral cause first. If it is not dental or oral, see your physician or ear, nose Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Why Do I Get Tingling Lips

Why Do I Get Tingling Lips

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community ONLY since I started this metformin ( week 2) and only in the evening..starts at 5pm and goes on and off all evening. Have you tested your blood sugar levels when this happens ? It may be that you are going low as tingling can be a symptom of Hypoglycemia. NO..I have not a got a go ahead yet from GP :roll: ( not for the testing thingy..will buy that..but unsure if he will prescribe strips)..just the past few days this has happened to me Started metformin..850mg last Monday 9 ..was very sick until Saturday..seem to be a lot better I would buy a meter and check when this happens and also mention it to your GP. It's not a known side effect of Metformin. Have you changed anything since this started such a diet, exercise or other medication etc. You also say you have been sick, it is possible that it could be a sign of dehydration as well. Drink plenty fluids and see if this helps but definitely see your GP about it. My body does not accept meds ( for anything )very well I had coxakie viral infection 6 years ago which seems to have really messed up my immune system. Not doing anything different really..A fairly good diet..I walk a lot ( with my job).I drink lots of water..only have wine at weekend..Not mega overweight..sigh..I bet it is the meds :cry: If so..I just cant bear to start yet another one Our alarm bells ring when we read ' Fairly healthy diet ' ! Is it healthy for a diabetic ? Tell us, in detail, what you eat on an average day then we may be able to make suggestion Continue reading >>

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