diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Lingo

Learn The Lingo: Diabetes Forecast

Learn The Lingo: Diabetes Forecast

There are so many ways to say sugar, it's easy to get confused. Refer to this glossary when scanning ingredients labels. Sucrose: White sugar is made up of sucrose, which naturally occurs in sugarcane or sugar beets. Sucrose contains equal parts glucose and fructose. Fructose: A naturally occurring sugar found in fruits and vegetables that produces a lower post-meal rise in blood glucose than sucrose. Glucose: The body obtains this naturally occurring sugar from carbohydrates, which are composed of chains of glucose. Maltodextrin: A carbohydrate derived from starch that's often used as filler in processed foods. Corn syrup: A syrup made from cornstarch that's composed primarily of glucose. Crystalline fructose: A cornstarch-derived, crystallized sweetener that contains close to 100 percent fructose and is found in sweetened foods and drinks. High fructose corn syrup: A cornstarch-derived syrup that's made up of a combination of fructose and glucose. It is typically used as a sweetener and preservative in processed foods. See below for more information. Think most of the sugar you're eating is cane sugar? Scan the ingredients list on your packaged productssweets, colas, bread, ketchup, and countless others. Chances are they're sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup. The liquid sweetener, which is cheaper than sugar (thanks to government corn subsidies and tariffs on imported sugar) and can extend a product's shelf life, counts for nearly half of all the caloric sweeteners Americans consume. Since 2004, when a landmark study linked high-fructose corn syrup to the escalating obesity epidemic, the sweetener has become highly controversial. Adding to the controversy is a current Corn Refiners Association ad campaign defending the product. High-fructose corn syrup is a thic Continue reading >>

Most Common Diabetes Phrase Used In Your House

Most Common Diabetes Phrase Used In Your House

When you live with diabetes or live with someone who has diabetes, it’s like you learn how to speak a new language. In fact, aside from the common terms you learn such as bolus, basal, infusion, ketones, etc., you begin to use your own phrases. Sometimes, while these phrases seem completely normal to you, those on the outside world unaffected by Diabetes (Lucky duckies!!) don’t quite get what you’re trying to say, and this can make for some interesting encounters. The most common phrase used in our house with 2 kiddos with type 1 diabetes kind of makes onlookers listening to the situation unfold look at you with judging eyes. I remember a few different times my kids were in the grocery store trying to bug me for something near the checkout and proclaiming they were going to starve to death if I didn’t buy it for them. I would simply turn to them and say “You’re only hungry right now because you’re high”. Of course, to those who are not privy to the diabetes lingo like we are, this doesn’t really mean the same thing. Many, many others were very judgmental of my parenting skills in that moment. But I have gotten a chuckle from it, each and every time. Recently, I asked those in the diabetes online community (DOC) what the most common diabetes related phrase spoken in their house was. It was interesting to see the variety of responses: Brooke Stevens Griebel: What’s your number? Ashlyn Mills: Where is my PDM? or Where is my diabetes bag? Christina Marie: Did you test? Mary Reagan: How low are you? Laura Hellings-Kinkead: Did you test? Elizabeth Mattos: Ur grumpy test Sandi Lopez: Time to take your blood sugar and take your insulin. Towa Johansson: Do you have high blood sugar. For more informative articles read the following: Elizabeth Mattos: If I hear Continue reading >>

Learn The Lingo Of Diabetes

Learn The Lingo Of Diabetes

A primer to help you get a grasp on the key issues of this complex illness. Article By:Joan Raymond; Reviewed by: Jessica Smerling, RD Sugar, which the body's cells use for immediate energy and stores for the future. After eating, blood glucose levels rise. Without insulin, blood glucose builds up in the blood. A hormone, produced by the pancreas that helps move glucose from the bloodstream to the cells. An autoimmune disorder that requires insulin to control. The immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas so that the pancreasproduces little or no insulin. Formerly called juvenile diabetes, it often develops in childhood and accounts for 5 to 10 percent of diagnosed cases of diabetes. The most common form of diabetes (90 to 95 percent), in which the body fails to produce enough insulin or the body is insulin resistant; i.e., the cells don't use the insulin properly. Can be controlled with oral meds, or even reversed, with diet, weight loss and exercise. A precursor of type 2 diabetes. When cells don't respond properly to the insulin that the body produces, sugar cannot move from the bloodstream to the cells. The pancreas produces extra insulin to compensate, but eventually it may be unable to do so. Often a precursor to full-blown diabetes, but can be reversible with weight loss and a proper diet. Prediabetes is diagnosed when blood-sugarlevels are elevated but not yet defined as diabetic. A cluster of conditions, including high blood sugar, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, elevated triglycerides and a large midsection (fat deposits at the waistline), which increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. If you're overweight your chances of developing diabetes is already elevated, but other factors increase your risk. Accor Continue reading >>

Word To The Wise: A T1d Slang Dictionary

Word To The Wise: A T1d Slang Dictionary

Sometimes people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) get so accustomed to our own slang and inside phrases, its easy to forget not everyone knows what were talking about. Heck, even to this day my grandmother still thinks LOL means lots of love. (Grammie, if youre reading this, Im sorry you had to find out this way. We just didnt have the heart to enlighten you when you texted us things like I know you can fight your high blood sugar LOL.) But you see my point; its perfectly normal to turn to your nine-year-old with T1D in the grocery store and ask are you high? but everyone else in that store will think youre crazy. Since Ill be attending JDRF Childrens Congress as a delegate this summer, Ive been thinking a lot about how important it is for me to communicate clearly. With 161 T1D delegates and families filling the halls of Congress next month, Members of Congress may hear a lot of strange words theyre not familiar with. With that in mind, my friend Kerri over at Six Until Me let me browse through her list of phrases (adorably named Diabetic Terms of Endearment; she has 12 pages of em!), and with that inspiration, Ive compiled a small list of my own favorite diabetic slang terms! Ive heard all of these used on at least one occasion by someone other than me, so I assure you theyre real. Sit back and relaxyoull understand what were talking about in no time! Bat Belt (noun) a belt you may wear if you have T1D. It is usually worn around the waist and may contain everything from insulin and a continuous glucose monitor to that grappling-hook thing that Batman uses to scale buildings. Crashing (verb) when blood sugar drops low and drops fast. This can sometimes result from a rage bolus (definition below); be warned! Ugh, my blood sugar went from 170 to 120 in half an hour, and I sti Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information At Womansday.com - What Is Diabetes? - Conditions And Diseases

Diabetes Information At Womansday.com - What Is Diabetes? - Conditions And Diseases

You've heard the diabetes lingo"insulin" and "type 2"but could you pass a short-answer test? If not, check out our quick study guide: Insulin resistance: Your pancreas produces insulin, which takes the glucose from your blood to your cells, giving them energy. Insulin resistance happens when your body doesn't respond to and/or use the insulin it makes, and your body has to produce more, which can cause high blood glucose levels. If it's not caught and treated, it can lead to pre-diabetes and diabetes. Pre-diabetes: When you have higher-than normal blood glucose levels but not high enough to classify as type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes: This is the most common form of diabetes. (There's also type 1, which happens when your pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin to control blood sugar levels. It's usually diagnosed in childhood.) If you have type 2, it means that either your body doesn't make enough insulin or your cells resist the insulin that is produced. Fasting blood sugar test: This is the test doctors usually give to screen for type 2 diabetes. Your blood sugar levels are measured after you've fasted for eight hours. If your levels are under 100 mg/dL, you're fine. Between 100 and 125, you have pre-diabetes; if your levels are 126 and over, you have full-blown type 2 diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test: Doctors use this to diagnose or confirm diabetes as well as to diagnose gestational diabetes. Two hours after you drink a sweet liquid that contains glucose, your blood sugar levels are tested. Under 140 mg/dL is normal, 140 199 mg/dL is pre-diabetes, and 200 mg/dL and over is diabetes. A1C test: Shows your average blood glucose levels over the past 2 to 3 months. Usually given to people with diabetes to help keep tabs on how well they're controlling their blood Continue reading >>

Glossary Of Diabetes Terms

Glossary Of Diabetes Terms

Acesulfame-k: An artificial sweetener used in place of sugar; it contains no carbohydrates or sugar; therefore, it has no effect on blood sugar levels . This sweetener is often used in conjunction with other artificial sweeteners in processed low-calorie foods. It is also used as a tabletop sweetener under the brand names Sunette, Sweet One, and Swiss Sweet. Acetone: A chemical formed in the blood when the body breaks down fat instead of sugar for energy; if acetone forms, it usually means the cells are starved. Commonly, the body's production of acetone is known as "ketosis." It occurs when there is an absolute or relative deficiency in insulin so sugars cannot get into cells for energy. The body then tries to use other energy sources like proteins from muscle and fat from fat cells. Acetone passes through the body into the urine. Acidosis: Too much acid in the body, usually from the production of ketones like acetone, when cells are starved; for a person with diabetes, the most common type of acidosis is called "ketoacidosis." Acute: Abrupt onset that is usually severe; happens for a limited period of time. Adrenal glands: Two endocrine glands that sit on top of the kidneys and make and release stress hormones, such as epinephrine (adrenaline), which stimulates carbohydrate metabolism; norepinephrine, which raises heart rate and blood pressure; and corticosteroid hormones, which control how the body utilizes fat, protein, carbohydrates, and minerals, and helps reduce inflammation. They also produce sex hormones like testosterone and can produce DHEA and progesterone. Adult-onset diabetes: A term for type 2 diabetes that is no longer used, because this type of diabetes is now commonly seen in children; "non-insulin dependent diabetes" is also considered an incorrect p Continue reading >>

Decoding Type 2 Diabetes Lingo: 6 Important Questions

Decoding Type 2 Diabetes Lingo: 6 Important Questions

Decoding Type 2 Diabetes Lingo: 6 Important Questions Diabetes educators often have more time than doctors to answer questions.(ISTOCKPHOTO)If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it's not unusual to be confused by the avalanche of new information, or to feel like your physician isn't telling you everything you need to know. "I've seen patients told they're diabetic and they're not given any materials," says Elizabeth Hardy, a Texas nurse with type 2 diabetes. When she got sick with sky-high blood sugar and pneumonia at the same time, she says, "I was very fortunate to go into a hospital that had a diabetes education program. I walked out of the hospital with some idea of what diabetes was." It can take a while to get up to speed on a confusing array of medical terms, and bringing a friend or partner to your health-care visits can help. 5 Things You Should Do After a Diabetes Diagnosis "Often, the diagnosis of diabetes can be overwhelming with many new terms and new prescriptions. The patient's physician, whether it's their primary care physician or their endocrinologist, may be providing them with a lot of information," says Katie Weinger of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. "It's lucky if the patient can hear 50% of what's said." Next Page: Your common questions answered [ pagebreak ]Here are some common questions. What's the difference between blood sugar and blood glucose, and why does my doctor keep talking about it? Answer: They're the same thing. It's your body's main source of energy, and the central problem in diabetes is that your body can't regulate and use it properly on its own, so you'll have to keep it controlled with food choices, exercise, and possibly medications. Is insulin something I have in my body already, or is it a medication? Answer Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Slang

Type 1 Diabetes Slang

After your diagnosis (Dx) for Type 1 diabetes (T1D), the diabetes online community (DOC) and your medical doctor (MD) will help you learn about BGMs, CGMs, and SMBG. If that sounds like a mouthful, its because it is. It helps to have a sense of humor when learning any new language, and no doubt about it, the world of insulin-dependent diabetes has its own language, and within it, a subset of slang. It may be confusing at first, not only learning so much about diabetes that you feel like you should be awarded a medical degree, but learning the shorthand for complicated terminology. Were here to help. Heres a primer to T1D slang that will have soon have you slinging acronyms like a short-order cook slings burgers. T1 and T2 The fundamentals. Type 1 (or insulin-dependent) diabetes, and Type 2, the version thats sometimes called adult-onset diabetes. Though they both share the word diabetes, T1 and T2 are vastly different, both in genesis and in their treatment. TM1 This means Diabetes mellitus Type 1 or 2, in doctor-speak. (Note: diabetes mellitus is completely unrelated to diabetes insipidus, which is most often kidney related. If you are T1 or T2, youre mellitus.) DX Diagnosis. Youll often hear parents of children with diabetes talk about life before and after the DX. BG OR BS. Blood glucose or blood sugar. Pretty much the same thing, but most people say BG for proprietys sake. DOC The diabetes online community. Youll want to become part of it right away. People living with diabetes come together in a variety of forums to share their stories and what they have learned. Got a question about anything related to diabetes or its treatment? Chances are, someone else has already been there, and will be happy to help you out. DBLOG Any blog about diabetes (including ours). SMB Continue reading >>

Diabetes Jargon, Abbreviations And Terminology

Diabetes Jargon, Abbreviations And Terminology

Diabetes Jargon, Abbreviations and Terminology This list of diabetes jargons includes most of the terminology and abbreviations that are used by those with diabetes, support nurses and in general on the forum. This list has been compiled from the Useful Abbreviations thread on the Diabetes Forum . Thanks go to Jem, Stuboy, SarahQ, Dennis, Tubolard and Timo2. This page will be updated regularly in accordance with any more terms added to the forum thread. For more information on terms used regarding diabetes, see the diabetes glossary . Amylin (Islet Amyloid Polypeptide) - Slows the rate at which digested carbohydrate appears as glucose in the blood and thus reduces total insulin demand Basal - referred to as the slow acting insulin used to cover your bodies own glucose stores Beta cells - Pancreatic cells responsible for the production of insulin, amylin and C-peptide BG - blood glucose (this is the measurement of glucose circulating in the blood) Biphasic insulin - An insulin mixture containing both fast acting and slow acting insulin, usually injected twice daily Bolus - referred to as the fast acting insulin used to cover food, typically carbohydrates, some cover for protein as well. Brittle diabetes (labile diabetes) - Most often seen in type 1 CHO - Carbohydrate (Carbon Hydrogen Oxygen) C-peptide - A by-product of normal insulin production Double diabetes - Comprises symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes Fulminant type 1 - An idiopathic subtype which has a very rapid onset and no honeymoon period G.I - Glycemic index. A G.I value tells you how rapidly a particular carbohydrate is turned G.L - Glycemic load. A G.L value takes into account not only G.I, but also the total quantity GAD (Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase) - Antibodies test Glucagon - A hormone produced Continue reading >>

Urban Thesaurus - Find Synonyms For Slang Words

Urban Thesaurus - Find Synonyms For Slang Words

examples: money, friend, trying to impress others, boyfriend or girlfriend Urban Thesaurus finds slang words that are related to your search query. As you've probably noticed, the slang synonyms for "term" are listed above. Note that due to the nature of the algorithm, some results returned by your query may only be concepts, ideas or words that are related to "term" (perhaps tenuously). This is simply due to the way the search algorithm works. You might also have noticed that many of the synonyms or related slang words are racist/sexist/offensive/downright appalling - that's mostly thanks to the lovely community over at Urban Dictionary (not affiliated with Urban Thesaurus). Urban Thesaurus crawls the web and collects millions of different slang terms, many of which come from UD and turn out to be really terrible and insensitive (this is the nature of urban slang, I suppose). Hopefully the related words and synonyms for "term" are a little tamer than average. The Urban Thesaurus was created by indexing millions of different slang terms which are defined on sites like Urban Dictionary . These indexes are then used to find usage correlations between slang terms. The official Urban Dictionary API is used to show the hover-definitions. Note that this thesaurus is not in any way affiliated with Urban Dictionary. Due to the way the algorithm works, the thesaurus gives you mostly related slang words, rather than exact synonyms. The higher the terms are in the list, the more likely that they're relevant to the word or phrase that you searched for. The search algorithm handles phrases and strings of words quite well, so for example if you want words that are related to lol and rofl you can type in lol rofl and it should give you a pile of related slang terms. Or you might try Continue reading >>

Definitions Of The Most Commonly Used Diabetes Terms & Jargon

Definitions Of The Most Commonly Used Diabetes Terms & Jargon

Definitions of the most commonly used diabetes terms & jargon Recently I realized, that people visiting this blog come from different backgrounds and are in very different stages regarding of how long theyve had diabetes and how much do they know about it. So, what for some of us may seem basics, for other recently diagnosed may be essential to know. Thats why I decided to put together a list of the most common terms and vocabulary related to diabetes that youll find over and over again during your years with diabetes. Ill try to define the terms as clearly and shortly as possible so that anyone can understand it. I classified them into several categories to be easier to access, as well as sortedalphabetically. If you happen to stumble upon a term or jargon not listed here, please let me know it in the comments section below, and Ill do my best to find the answer and add it to the list. And if you prefer to take a look at the list of most frequently asked questions about diabetes, you can do it here . Basal rate: for people injecting insulin the basal rate is the amount of insulin needed to manage the daily insulin/sugar fluctuations. In this case, the long-acting insulin acts as basal insulin. For people using an insulin pump, the basal rate is refered to as the small doses of short-acting insulin needed between meals to mantain blood sugar levels close to normal. Blood glucose (BG) or blood sugar (BS): the amount of sugar ( glucose ) present in the blood of the body. A healthy body usually autoregulates the blood glucose between 64.8 and 104.4 mg/dL. The intestines or liver transport glucose to body cells via the bloodstream. Glucose is made available for cell absorption via the hormone insulin. Blood glucose meter (glucometer): the device used to measure blood sugar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lingo | T1 Everyday Magic

Diabetes Lingo | T1 Everyday Magic

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney When I talk to other people about Kaitlyns type 1 diabetes, I usually try to talk about it in terms that they would understand. There are very few people who really understand what type 1 diabetes is, and even fewer understand all the ins and outs of daily diabetes management. I lean toward using words and phrases that anyone would understand, but occasionally I forget and start using my type 1 lingo. The other day, I was talking to my friend whose daughter is a good friend to Kaitlyn. She was really concerned about Kaitlyn, because she had just had a really rough night, and I had kept her home from church that day. When I was explaining about what happened, I said, Its not a big deal. Shes O.K. She was pretty high most of the night because her site failed, and so she didnt get very good sleep. It happens once in a while. My friend went open-mouthed and gasped, What? Her SIGHT failed? She thought I was saying that it was no big deal that her eyes lost their ability to see, and even more startling that this happens on a regular basis. We had a good laugh when we figured out our miscommunication, and I told her that I was referring to her insulin pump SITE. This is not the first time this has happened. Some have mistakenly thought I was referring to a high from illegal drug use as opposed to high blood sugar levels. Misunderstandings happen even in our own family. My older daughter Anna misunderstood me once when I told her that we needed to test Kaitlyn. She thought I wanted to check her blood sugar, when I really meant that I needed to test her on her spelling words. Not only do we tend to use words that can be mistakenly understood in a different way, the type 1 community also has all kinds of special terms and slang and more Continue reading >>

Lab Test Terms - Diabetes Self-management

Lab Test Terms - Diabetes Self-management

Here are definitions for some common terms you may encounter on a lab test report: Pre-analytical sample activities. All steps taken between the ordering of your test and the arrival of the sample in a lab. Analytical sample activities. What happens to your sample in the lab. Postanalytical activities. What happens after the testing is completed, including the reporting process. Specimen control. A liquid sample that mimics a human body fluid and contains a known amount of an analyte such as glucose. It is tested on a laboratory instrument to ensure that testing will indeed produce the correct result. Test precision. How statistically likely a test is to produce the same result if it is repeated using the same method and instruments. In other words, how repeatable is the test result? Test accuracy. How close a test comes to showing the true result. For example, portable glucose meters must have an accuracy range of 20% (as required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration) compared with a laboratory instrument testing the same sample. Reference range. For a lab test, the range of results that is commonly seen in healthy people. The term reference has been used since normal fell out of favor. To obtain these numbers, a large group of clearly defined healthy people (usually young adults with no known health conditions) is tested, and their results are compiled and averaged. Out-of-range results should not necessarily cause alarm; often, they mean that further testing is warranted. A reference range may also be referred to as a reference interval or as reference values. Return to Understanding Your Lab Test Results Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lingo Type 1 Diabeater

Diabetes Lingo Type 1 Diabeater

Basal insulin is a 24-hour, slow releasing insulin which mimics the bodys production of insulin without food. Basal insulin should keep a diabetics blood sugar levels steady whilst fasting. An extra amount of insulin taken which mimics the bodys production of insulin atmeal times, or to correct an unexpected rise in blood sugar levels. High Blood Sugar it tends to be gradual, and can be caused by too much food, too little insulin, illness or stress. Symptoms include: Shaking, sweating, anxiety, dizziness, hunger, a quickened heartbeat, impaired vision, weakness, fatigue, headache and irratability. Blood sugar tends to be marked at > 11.1mmol/L (>200mg/dl). Low Blood Sugar tends to bea fast onset, and can be caused by too little food, too much insulin, or extra exercise. Symptoms include: extreme thirst, frequent urination, dry skin, hunger, blurred vision, drowsiness andnausea. Blood sugar tends to be marked at >3.9mmol/L (70mg/dl) Blood Glucose (or Blood Sugar). The main sugar that the body makes from the food we eat. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Slang - Type 1 Diabetes Slang Terms - T1d Living A Diabetes Blog

Diabetes Slang - Type 1 Diabetes Slang Terms - T1d Living A Diabetes Blog

Slang. Originally the language of criminals, slang is used today by well everyone. Here in New Enlgand our slang is wicked cool. We bang ueys and drink from bubblers. In the midwest they drink pop and serve hotdishs. And those with T1D, well, we have our own slag tooDiabetes Slang Gusher Remember those sugary gummies that would gush when you squeezed them? well thats what we call a finger that gets a deep finger poke and wont stop bleeding. or when an old one opens up and starts spurting everywhere like ol faithful. Hypo/Hyper Hangover When youve been youve been up all night dealing will a low (or high) and feel like death the next morning. Type Zero people that think they know everything about T1D but really have NO idea. Roller Coastering what your blooodsugar looks like after a crazy spurt of highs and lows. Zombied when youre low, walking to the fridge for sugar. Eyes closed, arms out, moving in slow-mo (and usualy stumbling), and making some kind of groaning noise. Some people use the word zombied in reference to their fingers that are too cold to get blood out of them, but I personally use the fridge definition. Free Food food that you dont have to bolus for! every diabetic LOVES free food! NDR you might see this on a lot of online communities. It stands for Not Diabetes Related. Because sometimes you just DONT want to talk about diabetes, but for some reason we feel the need to warn people that what were about to say is NDR. D-Bag you know, the bag that carries all your diabetes supplies. Pen No were not talking about a writing instrument, were talking about our insulin pen. Diaversary that wonderful day you were blessed with diabetes. Dia put before anyword and it means diabetes. Ex. Diabadass, diafail, diawin. Snake Eyes when you poke your finger for a glucose Continue reading >>

More in diabetes