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How To Improve Blood Sugar Levels And Reverse Diabetes For Good

How To Improve Blood Sugar Levels And Reverse Diabetes For Good

Every 23 seconds another person is diagnosed with diabetes — one the leading causes of death in the United States. But these people don’t have to suffer. Diabetes is preventable, manageable, and reversible. What is Diabetes? — A Quick Overview There are two types of diabetes — type 1 and type 2. This is an over-simplified chart, but it gives you a good visual of the differences and similarities between the two. Now, let’s dig a little deeper into each type of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance happens when blood sugar levels are so consistently high that the cells don’t respond to insulin (a hormone that helps lower blood sugar) like they used to. When the cell aren’t as sensitive to insulin, blood sugar levels raise even more. As a result, insulin levels raise and the cells become more insulin resistant. This vicious cycle is commonly caused by eating too much sugar, not moving enough, and stressing too much. Conversely, type 1 diabetes is when the body lacks the ability to produce insulin. In some cases, this is happens because the immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Despite the lack of insulin, type 1 diabetics can still manage their blood sugar levels by taking exogenous insulin. Although type 1 and type 2 diabetes are caused in completely different ways, they both lead to higher blood sugar levels that will destroy cells throughout the body and cause chronic inflammation. If we can improve blood sugar levels then we can manage and reverse diabetes — regardless of which type of diabetes it is. The Best Treatment for Diabetes — Diet Studies continuously show that eating less sugar and more whole foods is an effective way to manage blood sugar Continue reading >>

Drug That Can Head Off Diabetes Is Rarely Used

Drug That Can Head Off Diabetes Is Rarely Used

Drug That Can Head Off Diabetes Is Rarely Used A UCLA study finds that few doctors prescribe a low-cost drug that has been proven effective in preventing the onset of diabetes. The study found that only 3.7 percent of U.S. adults with pre-diabetes were prescribed metformin during a recent three-year period. Metformin and lifestyle changes both can prevent the onset of diabetes, but people often struggle to adopt healthier habits, says Tannaz Moin, MD, assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Endocrinology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. Diabetes is prevalent, but pre-diabetes is even more prevalent, and we have evidence-based therapies like metformin that are very safe and that work, Dr. Moin says. Metformin is rarely being used for diabetes prevention among people at risk for developing the disease. This is something that patients and doctors need to be talking about and thinking about. It is estimated that about one-third of adults in the U.S. are pre-diabetic, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood-sugar levels. In 2008, the American Diabetes Association added metformin to its Standards for Medical Care in Diabetes guidelines for use in diabetes prevention for those at very high risk who are under age 60, are severely obese or have a history of gestational diabetes. Under the guidelines, metformin may also be considered for patients whose blood sugar is above normal but not yet in the diabetes range. The researchers examined data from 2010 to 2012 from UnitedHealthcare, the nations largest private insurer, for a national sample of 17,352 adults aged 19 to 58 with pre-diabetes. They also found: The prevalence of metformin prescriptions was 7.8 percent for severely obese patients. Me Continue reading >>

Rhonda Hall's Story - Diabetes Survivor - Women's Lifestyle Magazine Of Greater Kalamazoo

Rhonda Hall's Story - Diabetes Survivor - Women's Lifestyle Magazine Of Greater Kalamazoo

Elementary school teacher, Rhonda Hall knew she needed to lose weight, but it wasnt until she was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes she made the lifestyle changes she needed. Rhonda realized something was wrong with her health in 2004. Shed always struggled with her weight, but, at 33, she suddenly gained 60 pounds despite her diet plan. At her annual gynecological exam, her doctor urged her to re-double her weight-loss efforts. The rapid weight gain wasnt the only cause for concern. When her ankles swelled after taking a trip to visit family, Rhonda confronted her doctor who ran some tests. When she got a call the next morning, she knew there was a problem. She was diagnosed with hypothydroidism, a condition in which the thyroid doesnt produce enough hormones. If untreated, it can lead to complications including obesity and heart disease. Although medication was prescribed, Rhonda still didnt feel good. She returned to the doctor who ran some more tests. This time they showed she had Type 2 diabetes. Rhonda ended up having to get four shots a day to manage her health. Over the next seven years, Rhondas health had ups and downs. Her inconsistency with taking her medicine made her problem worse, requiring higher dosages at times. In February 2012, spurred by weight loss competitions at her work and church, Rhonda got more serious about losing weight. It was like a collective echo saying Lets get healthy, she said. My family experience was that if you got diabetes or heart disease, theres nothing you can do about it. The reality was that I was able to change it. With healthy lifestyle changes, you can live a long, healthy life, even if you have a family history. Working out each morning and sticking to a strict diet plan, she lost nearly 50 pounds in four months. Despite a Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Or Reverse Diabetes Mellitus

How To Prevent Or Reverse Diabetes Mellitus

How to Prevent or Reverse Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Mellitus is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States. According to theCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about one in 10 American adults has diabetes. If trends continue, that figure is expected to double or triple by 2050. Diabetes is a group of diseases that involve high blood sugar (glucose) levels. Every cell in our body needs energy to function and that energy comes in the form of glucose. When we eat, our body breaks down foods that have carbohydrates and converts them into sugar. The pancreas then releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin acts as a key, allowing the sugar to be removed from the blood and enter the cells. Insulin helps to store energy for later use and is a vital part of metabolism. Without it, our body is not able to function or perform properly. Uncontrolled diabetes is the leading cause of heart disease and can lead to a variety of other serious complications, including stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, and eye disease. There are several types of Diabetes: Type I, Type II and Gestational. Each form is dependent upon the amount of insulin that is produced by our body. Diabetes Type I is an autoimmune disorder in which the pancreas is unable to produce insulin. It was formally referred to as Juvenile Diabetes or Insulin-dependent Diabetes. There is no cure for Diabetes Type I; in order to survive, insulin must be taken. This form of Diabetes affects up to 10% of the population with the majority being children. Diabetes Type II, representing 90 95% of all cases of diabetes, is a disorder in which the pancreas does not make enough insulin or our body cannot effectively use it. This type is also known as Insulin Resistant Diabetes. Gestational Diabetes is another fo Continue reading >>

Managing The Costs Of Diabetes

Managing The Costs Of Diabetes

Managing diabetes comes with costs. From healthy eating to testing supplies to medications, working toward recommended glucose levels can add up to some big financial expenses. The American Diabetes Association estimates that medical costs attributed to diabetes care equal about $7,900 per year and that medical expenses for a person with diabetes is 2.3 times higher than a person without diabetes. Meal planning and exercise are often first choices to manage blood sugars. Choosing healthy foods in the right amounts and staying active can help by decreasing insulin resistance, promoting weight loss, decreasing your need for medications and lowering your risks for diabetes-related complications. You dont need to hire a personal trainer or join a gym to exercise. Check your community for free or discounted exercise classes, try walking the paths at local parks or walking at a mall, look for discounted exercise equipment or check the internet for exercise videos that can be done in your home. Healthy eating doesnt have to be expensive. Having a meal plan and using it will help with portion control. Planning menus in advance and making a grocery list will decrease costs at the grocery store. Avoid shopping when youre hungry. Signing up for your grocery stores customer programs or shopping at discount grocery stores can also result in savings for you. Shopping for fresh fruits and vegetables that are in season or growing your produce is a way to save costs. Also, plan for leftovers yesterdays grilled chicken can be used for fajitas or a stir fry today. Monitoring your blood sugars may be part of your diabetes management plan. It is important to know how often to check your blood sugar and how to use these results. You can reduce some of these costs by choosing a monitoring sy Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Shape Magazine

Diabetes | Shape Magazine

You may think you already know the signs of diabetes: You're thirsty all the time, you feel exhausted 24/7 and/or you're constantly running to the bathroom. Yet a surprising number of Americans have abnormally high blood-sugar (glucose) levels but don't know it. The signs can be so subtleor altogether absentthat the problem goes undetected, yet it increases the risk for heart disease and other serious health problems. As more and more of us pack on extra pounds, the incidence of diabetes and its recently defined precursor, pre-diabetes, is soaring in the United States. Diabetes is a disease in which levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. Normally, after a meal, the body breaks food down into glucose, which the blood carries to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not manufacture enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. There are many different types of diabetes. The two main ones are called type 1 and type 2. A third form of diabetes is called gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, and young adults. In this form of diabetes, the pancreas no longer makes insulin because t Continue reading >>

Curing Diabetes: How Type 2 Became An Accepted Lifestyle

Curing Diabetes: How Type 2 Became An Accepted Lifestyle

Diabetes is big business, and many have been convinced that managing it forever is their only option. But it is possible to cure the disease. Chuck Lynch figured that after being diagnosed with type 2 (adult onset) diabetes, he was destined for a life of daily finger sticks and medication to keep the glucose level in his blood at a normal level. Everything he'd heard about type 2 suggested strongly that his only choice was to make the best of it. "I thought it was something you managed for the rest of your life," said the 62-year-old Lyme, Connecticut, resident. "I didn't know you could cure it." Experts hesitate to talk about "curing" diabetes, given the medical complications it can cause that will require lifelong monitoring. But the American Diabetes Association says that maintaining normal blood sugar without medication for at least a year could be considered a "complete remission." It's not a message you hear very often if your information about type 2 diabetes comes mainly from TV commercials for the devices and medications used to manage the disease. Diabetes is a big business, worth tens of billions of dollars to the health care system and the pharmaceutical companies that hold the patents on those devices and medications. Another reason you don't hear about remission is it takes a great deal of effort. Even the health care system seems content to prescribe complex lifelong treatment regimens instead of equipping people with the tools they need to effectively manage type 2 diabetes, possibly reverse the disease or, best of all, avoid it completely. Chuck Lynch created his own diabetes-reversal program, and it has become the retiree's new job. He dropped 30 pounds with the help of Weight Watchers, and now carefully measures every morsel and drop that goes into hi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Is Serious But Manageable

Diabetes Type 2 Is Serious But Manageable

Am I at Risk? If you have wondered or possibly been told that you are at risk for developing diabetes or that you have prediabetes, you should know that diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Studies show that people at high risk for diabetes can prevent or delay the onset of the disease by losing 5 to 7 percent of their weight, if they are overweight—that's 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. Two keys to success: 1Get at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity five days a week. 2Eat a variety of foods that are low in fat and reduce the number of calories you eat per day. In other words, you don't have to knock yourself out to prevent diabetes. The key is: small steps that lead to big rewards. Learn more about your risk for developing type 2 diabetes and the small steps you can take to delay or prevent the disease and live a long, healthy life. Family Health History Family health history is an important risk factor for developing a number of serious diseases, including type 2 diabetes. In fact, most people with type 2 diabetes have a family member—such as a mother, father, brother, or sister—with the disease. Take Small Steps to Prevent Diabetes When you take steps to prevent diabetes, you will also lower your risk for possible complications of diabetes such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, and other health problems. That's a big reward for you and your family and friends. Diabetes HealthSense Find tools and programs that can help you with making lifestyle and behavior changes. Diabetes HealthSense also includes research articles on lifestyle changes and behavioral strategies. Diabetes Risk Factors There are many factors that increase your risk for diabetes. To find out about your risk, note ea Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes Blogs Of The Year

The Best Diabetes Blogs Of The Year

We’ve carefully selected these blogs because they are actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their readers with frequent updates and high-quality information. If you would like to tell us about a blog, nominate them by emailing us at [email protected]! Diabetes is one of the largest health issues facing Americans today. More than 29 million adults in the U.S. have diabetes — and almost one quarter of them don’t know they have it. A further 86 million adults in the U.S. have prediabetes, a condition which increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A whopping 90 percent of these people are unaware of that, too. Both forms of diabetes — type 1 and type 2 — are chronic conditions, meaning they require a lifetime of careful treatment to be properly managed. If left untreated or improperly managed, diabetes can cause serious health complications. For those living with diabetes, the condition can be isolating and take up a significant amount of time as well as mental and emotional energy. Staying on top of your treatments can also be challenging, as everyday things can make a big impact on blood glucose readings, and treatment options are always changing. That’s why we’ve rounded up the best diabetes blogs out there. Whether you’re looking for recipes, resources, treatment options, or simple tips for living well, you’re sure to find something here for you. Diabetes Self-Management Blog Diabetes Self-Management has provided health information to the diabetes community for over 35 years. Their companion blog rounds up tips and info from both healthcare professionals and people living with diabetes. Posts range from hard-hitting news to tips and information you can use, like busting myths about grain. There are also personal stories, to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lifestyle Interventions Make People Healthier, Not Smarter

Diabetes Lifestyle Interventions Make People Healthier, Not Smarter

Diabetes Lifestyle Interventions Make People Healthier, Not Smarter After 10 years of intensive lifestyle intervention for overweight adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus, participants demonstrated better general and physical health than those without the intervention, but no better cognitive assessment scores, according to the latest report from the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial. In addition to a lack of association of cognitive function with improvement in weight, fitness or glycemic control, the researchers reported a modest trend of harm to cognitive functioning among those receiving the intervention who had greater body mass index ( "The results...highlight the adverse cognitive consequences of diabetes mellitus and associated comorbidities and indicate the importance of understanding the mechanisms by which cognition is adversely affected, and of developing preventive and treatment interventions", observed Stephen Rapp, PhD, Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina and colleagues. From over 5,000 volunteers who enrolled in Look AHEAD from 2001 to 2004, 3,751 received cognitive assessments at baseline and after 10 years randomization to either the intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) or to customary diabetes support and education. The ILI participants were assigned dietary and physical activity goals for weight loss, with frequent follow-up in group or individual sessions. Relative to those receiving customary support and education, the participants achieved and maintained significantly greater weight loss, better fitness, better glycemic control or a remission of diabetes, and attenuation of known cardiovascular risk factors. The researchers noted that the lack of difference Continue reading >>

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Any Across Selfmanagement Other Of Top Proper One And And Online Diabetes Only With Is It The That Old My Diabetes Articles Top Community Being More Compared The Completely Of Published Hasnt Much Two Also Ignore Magazines Prim As Seriousa The Comes To The Lady Seems Magazines

family guy online ninja assassin jasmine in gustakh dil desitvforum Uncategorized Any across selfmanagement other of top proper one and and online diabetes only with is it the that old my diabetes articles top community being more compared the completely of published hasnt much two also ignore magazines prim as seriousa the comes to the lady seems magazines Diabetic living magazine. Diabetic living official site. Subscribe diabetes selfmanagement. Diabetic gourmet magazine official site. Diabetes magazines mendosa. buizen vertalen frans nederlands , rda v2 Awardwinning diabetes lifestyle magazine with diabetic recipes diabetes meal plans diet tips and tools helping people living with diabetes since 1995 Home diabetic recipes free diabetes magazine more. Cdiabetes free diabetes magazine save on diabetes. Official site tradjenta174 linagliptin. Asweetlife the diabetes magazine. Online magazine diabetes health. Diabetes magazine find diabetes magazine. Diabetes forecast official site. Diabetic living subscription . Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes management requires awareness. Know what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall — And how to control these day-to-day factors. Keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor can be challenging. That's because many things make your blood sugar levels change, sometimes unexpectedly. Following are some factors that can affect your blood sugar levels. Food Healthy eating is a cornerstone of healthy living — with or without diabetes. But if you have diabetes, you need to know how foods affect your blood sugar levels. It's not only the type of food you eat but also how much you eat and the combinations of food types you eat. What to do: Learn about carbohydrate counting and portion sizes. A key to many diabetes management plans is learning how to count carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the foods that often have the biggest impact on your blood sugar levels. And for people taking mealtime insulin, it's crucial to know the amount of carbohydrates in your food, so you get the proper insulin dose. Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions for the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size and an accurate carbohydrate count. Make every meal well-balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats. It's especially important to pay attention to the types of carbohydrates you choose. Some carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are better for you than are others. These foods are low in carbohydrates and contain fiber that helps keep your blood sugar levels more stable. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and Continue reading >>

A Sweet Life Without Sugar

A Sweet Life Without Sugar

When 29-year-old novelist and writer Bridget McNulty was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes four years ago, she felt completely overwhelmed and frightened by all the negative informationthat was dumped on her aboutthe disease. I was terrified by all the pamphlets, which warned me of all the bad things that could happen to me as a diabetic, she recalls. Complications from diabetes include eye problems and the risk of going blind, an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, foot and skin problems and, the worst of all to Bridget, amputations. I remember misreading a pamphlet as saying 70% of diabetics are amputees instead of 70% of amputees are diabetics, Bridget says. That totally freaked me out! Bridget was still trying to come to terms with her diagnosis and what it all meant, and the apparent doom and gloom messagedid not help at all. Before being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, Bridgetled a very busy life. After completing her creative writing studies in the US, she wrote, published and marketed her first novel and started working in Cape Town full-time achieving all this by the age of 25. Her hectic lifestyle, however,caught up with her and she started to sufferfrom bouts of extreme exhaustion. When she finally ended up in ICU (two weeks after her book launch), the doctor discovered her blood-sugar levels to be at a dangerously high 24. I was two days away from a coma, says Bridget. Read the full story of her diagnosis and recovery here. Luckily, Bridget found a very good dietician and endocrinologist who helped her adjust to her new lifestyle and, together with a very supportive family and boyfriend, she became healthy and strong again. Its beenfour years now and I sometimes forget that Im a diabetic. I eat healthily , exercise regularly and inject myself with insul Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Magazine For Diabetics

Lifestyle Magazine For Diabetics

When I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes four years ago, I thought my life had come to an abrupt end. How could I ever feel like a normal person, go out for dinner, travel, dance and live a happy life again? Now, after living with the condition every day for the past few years, I know that while diabetes demands a lot of daily attention, its entirely possible to live a happy, healthy life. Thats one of the reasons were starting Sweet Life, a new diabetes lifestyle magazine that is launching in November and being distributed free four times a year to anyone who signs up for it. We want to show that life can be sweet without (too much) sugar, that it is possible to live your best life with diabetes. Sweet Life isnt only a magazine, its a community for South African diabetics. We have a website and community blog, where people can e-mail questions, tips, advice and concerns about living with diabetes; a mobi site for those who want to access the information and ask questions from their cellphones; a Facebook page for daily social interaction with other diabetics; and a monthly e-mail newsletter. The magazine is packed full of interesting articles 10 fast facts about low GI and why meditation is good for diabetes tips and advice what you need to know if youve just been diagnosed or if youve been living with the condition for years healthy recipes that are also delicious and information on making living with diabetes easier. We have a fantastic team of experts on our panel, from endocrinologists to podiatrists, ophthalmologists, biokineticists, diabetic nurse educators and a health coach. Our dietitian answers your questions from Facebook and the website, and we have a special section for the partners of those with diabetes parents, children, husbands and wives. Send us yo Continue reading >>

Turmeric And Diabetes

Turmeric And Diabetes

Every now and then we hear about a common food that contains amazing healing properties. Turmeric is a fine example. Although it is a spice that has been used in Asian medicine for thousands of years, its potential to cure disease has been largely ignored in the West. Now we are told it can be used to treat a whole list of ailments from diarrhea to diabetes, and scientific tests are beginning to back up these claims. What is Turmeric? The turmeric plant, a member of the Zingiberaceae or ginger family, is native to Southeast Asia. Like ginger, the rhizome, or root, is the source of the spice. The turmeric root looks much like ginger root except for its color. While ginger is white, turmeric is orange, so orange, it was used as a dye before it was used for medicinal purposes. If you’ve never bought turmeric, you may not realize you’ve eaten it. Chances are, you have. It is the main spice in curries, the spice that gives curry powders an orange color. What Does Turmeric Contain That Aids in Healing? Curcumin has been identified as turmeric’s source of healing properties. Curcumin is both an anti-inflammatory and a strong anti-oxidant. It prevents inflammation and reduces chronic inflammation. It has also been found to induce apoptosis (cell death) in cancer and pre-cancer cells. What is Turmeric Used to Treat? According to Web M.D., turmeric is used internally to treat the following: Arthritis Heartburn (dyspepsia) Joint pain Stomach pain Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis Bypass surgery Hemorrhage Diarrhea Intestinal gas Stomach bloating Loss of appetite Jaundice Liver problems Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection Stomach ulcers Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Gallbladder disorders High cholesterol Lichen planus Skin inflammation from radiation treatment, Continue reading >>

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