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Diabetes Level Chart

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

Keeping Diabetes In Checkreading Your Blood Glucose Meter

Keeping Diabetes In Checkreading Your Blood Glucose Meter

What does the reading on my blood glucose meter mean? The meter shows you a number that tells you the amount of glucose there is in your blood. The table below tells you what they mean. drink lots of water cut down on carbohydrates (sugars) until your blood glucose level comes down, but do not fast do extra blood test (every four hours) consult your doctor to adjust your medications if your reading is still high. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview Keeping your blood sugar in a target range reduces your risk of problems such as diabetic eye disease (retinopathy), kidney disease (nephropathy), and nerve disease (neuropathy). Some people can work toward lower numbers, and some people may need higher goals. For example, some children and adolescents with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, people who have severe complications from diabetes, people who may not live much longer, or people who have trouble recognizing the symptoms of low blood sugar may have a higher target range. And some people, such as those who are newly diagnosed with diabetes or who don't have any complications from diabetes, may do better with a lower target range. Work with your doctor to set your own target blood sugar range. This will help you achieve the best control possible without having a high risk of hypoglycemia. Diabetes Canada (formerly the Canadian Diabetes Association) suggests the following A1c and blood glucose ranges as a general guide. Continue reading >>

Managing Highs And Lows Of Blood Glucose Levels

Managing Highs And Lows Of Blood Glucose Levels

Disclaimer - This content has been created for information purposes only, please consult your doctor before taking any decision on diabetes management. Although great care has been taken in compiling and checking the information, Johnson and Johnson Ltd., and its associates shall not be responsible, or in any way liable for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies in this publication whether arising from negligence or otherwise however, or for any consequence arising there from. Hyperglycemia is blood glucose levels that rise above the Diabetes Safe Zone. The American Diabetes Association defines hyperglycemia as blood glucose levels over 130 mg/dL(7.2 mmol/L). If you are on insulin it is also important to watch out for high blood glucose (also known as hyperglycemia), which increases your risk of complications, such as heart attack. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is often the only sure way to detect hyperglycemia. For most people, keep blood glucose levels- Your own blood glucose targets need to be carefully individualized. Please check with your personal physician on what blood glucose target values are right for you and your condition. Regular monitoring helps you spot patterns to try to avoid high and low blood glucose, reduce complications of diabetes, and help control your diabetes. Let's look at situations that may cause high blood glucose and how planning ahead may help you prevent highs and lows. Plan ahead and be prepared for high fasting results If you have high fasting results, you may have: Missed your evening dose of insulin Plan: Keep your insulin kit by your bedside and post reminder notes Used a new insulin or new dosage or your insulin needs to be adjusted Plan: Self-monitor before injecting. Follow up the next morning with a fasting blood glucos Continue reading >>

Diabetes Food Chart 3

Diabetes Food Chart 3

What is the key to successfully managing diabetes? The foods we consume are THE most important factor. A truly diabetes friendly, Diabetes Food Chart designed to help diabetics obtain and maintain truly normal blood sugars is crucial to your success. a truly diabetes friendly food chart foods you can eat daily foods to avoid The diabetes food chart below is unlike most, it has been tested and it has been proven to help diabetics. If you will follow this diabetes food chart it will help you reduce blood sugars. Most other diabetes food charts are high carb, grain based charts that promote elevated blood sugars and ever-increasing drug requirements. They were designed and promoted by the Medical Industry, Big Food and Big Pharma. These are the same groups and companies that profit from diabetes. Truly Diabetes Friendly In 2009 I was an obese, chronically sick, newly diagnosed diabetic. Using the diabetes food chart on this page, I successfully manage my blood sugars. This food chart can help you too. How do I know? It helps everyone who tries it. Every one. This food chart is truly diabetes friendly, not Big Food, Big Pharma and Medical Industry friendly. Diabetes Friendly Food Chart Let’s look at the diabetes food chart above, level by level. Note: The base of the chart or pyramid is wider, these are the foods you need to eat the most. As you move up the chart, those are foods you can eat less. The Base – MEATS! All meats are ok to eat including fish, beef, pork and poultry. Fatty meats are even better. Fatty meats are the cornerstone of my personal diabetes meal plan and are the base of this diabetes food chart. If I do eat lean cuts, I usually add butter to increase the fat content.Limit processed deli meats. Always check ingredient lists to avoid eating fillers th Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Levels

Normal Blood Sugar Levels

Normal Blood Sugar Levels are provided in the Blood Glucose Chart. A simple diabetes blood test using diabetes test strips allows for continuous blood glucose monitoring at home. How do you check your blood glucose level? Put blood from a finger prick on a diabetes test strip. Blot off excess blood with a tissue. Read the glucose test strip either by comparing the colour with the colour chart on the test strip bottle or by using an electronic blood glucose meter. It is important to follow the instructions on the bottle or meter carefully. Daily bread - Can any human body handle gluten? Dr. Rodney Ford | TEDxTauranga Gluten – friend or foe? This was the talk that got the standing ovation and changed everyone’s eating habits for the rest of evening. Over the course of 15 minutes Dr. Rodney Ford, MB. BS. MD. FRACP, and a pioneer in the field of paediatric food allergies, convinced an audience of 500 that nobody is equipped to digest gluten. How did he do it? By using lego! Dr. Ford showed us the indigestible gluten protein is chased by the antibodies that our systems create to combat the gluten. Based on decades of research, Dr. Ford believes that abundant health can be achieved by anyone who eats the appropriate foods. Dr Rodney Ford, MB. BS. MD. FRACP, is a paediatrician and former Associate Professor in the Department of Paediatrics at Christchurch Clinical School. He is a specialist in food allergy and gastroenterology at the 'The Children's Clinic and Allergy Centre', Christchurch, New Zealand. Rodney's philosophy is “diet: not drugs” as he has seen too many people given medications for symptoms without first considering the possibility of food allergy or food intolerance. Rodney has been investigating adverse reactions to gluten for over 20 years and these il Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Chart

Blood Sugar Chart

This blood sugar chart shows normal blood glucose levels before and after meals and recommended HbA1c levels for people with and without diabetes. BLOOD SUGAR CHART Fasting Normal for person without diabetes 70–99 mg/dl (3.9–5.5 mmol/L) Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes 80–130 mg/dl (4.4–7.2 mmol/L) 2 hours after meals Normal for person without diabetes Less than 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L) Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes Less than 180 mg/dl (10.0 mmol/L) HbA1c Normal for person without diabetes Less than 5.7% Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes 7.0% or less Interested in learning more? Read about normal blood glucose numbers, getting tested for Type 2 diabetes and using blood sugar monitoring to manage diabetes. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is essential to your mental and physical health. The normal blood sugar levels chart below shows the range to shoot for and the diabetes blood sugar levels chart shows levels to avoid. What is blood sugar? It’s the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream that your body uses to produce energy. For most people, normal blood sugar levels range from 80 up to 140 – naturally fluctuating throughout the day. A healthy body has effective ways of regulating normal blood sugar levels. For example, if your blood sugar falls too low, extra glucose stored in your liver is absorbed into your bloodstream to make up the difference. Range of Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart Blood sugar is the fuel your body needs for energy. Insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas, helps you maintain normal blood sugar levels. This blood sugar levels chart below shows a normal blood sugar range. Range of Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart TIMING OF BLOOD SUGAR NORMAL RANGE (mg/dl) When you wake (before eating) 80 to 120 Before eating a meal 80 to 120 Taken 2 hours after eating Less than 140 Bedtime blood sugar range 100 to 140 Eating high glycemic carbohydrates is the main cause of higher than normal blood sugar levels and can lead to heart disease, diabetes, blindness, kidney disease and limb amputation from gangrene. Very high blood sugar can even lead to a diabetic coma. The chart below compares diabetes blood sugar levels to normal blood sugar levels. Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels vs Normal Blood Sugar Levels BLOOD SUGAR CLASSIFICATION FASTING MINIMUM FASTING MAXIMUM 2 HOURS AFTER EATING Normal Blood Sugar 70 120 Less than 140 Early Diabetes 100 125 140 to 200 Established Diabetes Over 125 Over 125 More than 200 *All numbers are mg/dl. How to Use Your Blood Sugar Lev Continue reading >>

A Simple Blood Sugar Level Guide - Charts, Measurements, Levels And Management

A Simple Blood Sugar Level Guide - Charts, Measurements, Levels And Management

What do you know about blood sugar levels? Depending on your experience, you may associate them with kids who have had way too much candy and are frantically running around the house. Or, if you suffer from diabetes, you probably think of regularly jabbing yourself with a needle to make sure you don’t need to immediately consume a candy bar. It can be a confusing topic if you don’t know the terms or what normal levels look like. That’s where we come in. In this article, we’re going to give you the what and why of blood sugar. We’re going to dive into what causes blood sugar levels to get high or low, and what what a normal blood sugar level should look like. Consider this a layman’s guide. It won’t give you every detail (you really should talk to your doctor), but it will guide you through the major points and help you understand what to keep an eye on. Let’s get started. What’s The Difference Between Sugar and Glucose? What comes to mind when you think of sugar? Probably the white granular stuff that you would secretly eat when you were a kid, right? But it’s actually more complicated than that. Sugar is the general name given to sweet carbohydrates that dissolve in water. There are a number of different types of sugars. Your body most frequently uses glucose. Fructose is found in fruit and lactose is found in milk. When you guzzle a big glass of milk or eat an apple, your body takes the lactose or fructose and converts it to glucose. Once everything is converted to glucose, your body can use it for energy. Starches, like those found in white bread, are sugars stuck together and are converted by your body into glucose. So far so good, right? Now, this is important. When people say “blood sugar”, they mean “blood glucose”. The terms can be us Continue reading >>

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) is the amount of glucose in your blood at a given time. It is important to check your blood glucose (sugar) levels, because it will: Provide a quick measurement of your blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Determine if you have a high or low blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Show you how your lifestyle and medication affect your blood glucose (sugar) levels; and Help you and your diabetes health-care team to make lifestyle and medication changes that will improve your blood glucose (sugar) levels. How often should you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels? How frequently you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels should be decided according to your own treatment plan. You and your health-care provider can discuss when and how often you should check your blood glucose (sugar) levels. Checking your blood glucose (sugar) levels is also called Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG). How do you test your blood glucose levels? A blood glucose (sugar) meter is used to check your blood glucose (sugar) at home. You can get these meters at most pharmacies or from your diabetes educator. Talk with your diabetes educator or pharmacist about which one is right for you. Once you receive a meter, ensure you receive the proper training before you begin to use it. Ask your health-care provider about: How and where to draw blood How to use and dispose of lancets (the device that punctures your skin) The size of the drop of blood needed The type of blood glucose (sugar) strips to use How to clean the meter How to check if the meter is accurate How to code your meter (if needed) Note: Your province or territory may subsidize the cost of blood glucose (sugar) monitoring supplies. Contact your local Diabetes Canada branch to find out if this appli Continue reading >>

Table 1 Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Table 1 Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Table 1 Blood Sugar Levels Chart Blood Sugar Levels Fasting Values Post Meal Value: 2 hrs after the Meal Normal 70 - 100 mg/dL Less than 140 mg/dL Early Diabetes 101 - 126 mg/dL 140 - 200 mg/dL Diabetes More than 126 mg/dL More than 200 mg/dL Table 2 Normal sugar levels chart during various times of the day Time Blood Sugar Level (mg/dl) After Waking Up 80 - 120 Just Before Meals 80 - 120 About 2 Hours After Meals < 160 Before Sleeping 100 - 140 Table 3 Low Blood Sugar Levels Chart Category Blood Sugar Level Normal 80 - 120 mg/dl Borderline Hypoglycemia 70 mg/dl Fasting Hypoglycemia 50 mg/dl Insulin Shock Less than 50 mg/dl Table 4 High Blood Sugar Levels Chart Category Minimum Level Maximum Level Pre-diabetes Fasting Blood Sugar Level 100 mg 126 mg Pre-diabetes Blood Sugar Level after Meal 140 mg 199 mg Diabetes Blood Sugar Level - Fasting 126 mg More than 126 mg Diabetes Blood Sugar Level After Meal 200 mg More than 200 mg > Blood Sugar Levels Blood sugar, also known as glucose is present in our bloodstream. The body uses glucose as its main form of fuel to produce energy.Glucose is the primary source of energy for the body's cells, produced by digesting the sugar and starch in carbohydrates. Blood lipids are primarily a compact energy store. Glucose is transported from the intestines or liver to body cells via the bloodstream, and is made available for cell absorption via the hormone insulin, produced by the body primarily in the pancreas. Blood sugar level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or animal. Glucose levels are usually lowest in the morning, before the first meal of the day, and rise after meals for an hour or two by a few millimolar.The normal range of the blood sugar level maintained by the body for its smooth functioning is Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

The aim of diabetes treatment is to bring blood sugar (“glucose”) as close to normal as possible. What is a normal blood sugar level? And how can you achieve normal blood sugar? First, what is the difference between “sugar” and “glucose”? Sugar is the general name for sweet carbohydrates that dissolve in water. “Carbohydrate” means a food made only of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. There are various different kinds of sugars. The one our body uses most is called “glucose.” Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies. Then we can use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. When people talk about “blood sugar,” they mean “blood glucose.” The two terms mean the same thing. In the U.S., blood sugar is normally measured in milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dl). A milligram is very little, about 0.00018 of a teaspoon. A deciliter is about 3 1/3 ounces. In Canada and the United Kingdom, blood sugar is reported in millimoles/liter (mmol/L). You can convert Canadian or British glucose levels to American numbers if you multiply them by 18. This is useful to know if you’re reading comments or studies from England or Canada. If someone reports that their fasting blood glucose was 7, you can multiply that by 18 and get their U.S. glucose level of 126 mg/dl. What are normal glucose numbers? They vary throughout the day. (Click here for a blood sugar chart.) For someone without diabetes, a fasting blood sugar on awakening should be under 100 mg/dl. Before-meal normal sugars are 70–99 mg/dl. “Postprandial” sugars taken two hours after meals should be less than 140 mg/dl. Those are the normal numbers for someone w Continue reading >>

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death. However, hyperglycemia, high-blood sugar levels consistently above 240 mg/dL, can be just as dangerous. Left untreated, at its most extreme high-blood sugar, can induce ketoacidosis, the build-up of toxic-acid ketones in the blood and urine. It can also bring on nausea, weakness, fruity-smelling breath, shortness of breath, and, as with hypoglycemia, coma. However, once they’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, most type 2s have taken steps to prevent or lessen the most dangerous effects of high-blood sugar levels. Their concern shifts to dealing with unexpected, sometimes alarming spikes in blood sugar levels. The symptoms of those spikes are the classic ones we associate with the onset of diabetes—unquenchable thirst, excessive urination, fatigue, weight loss, and headaches. When you do spike, what can you do right away to bring blood sugar levels down? Immediate Steps You Can Take: 1. Insulin—If you are on an insulin regimen; a bolus injection should drive numbers down fairly rapidly. 2. If you are not on insulin or don’t use fast-acting insulin, taking a brisk walk or bike ride works for most people to start bringing their numbers down. 3. Stay hydrated. Hyperglycemic bodies want to shed excess sugar, leading to frequent urination and dehydration. You need to drink water steadily until your numbers drop. 4. Curb your carb intake. It does not matter how complex the carbs in your diet are, your body still converts them to glucose at some point. Slacking off on carb consumption is a trackable maneuver that lets you better understand how to control your numbers. Preventative Steps: These are extensions Continue reading >>

A Guide To Blood Sugar Levels

A Guide To Blood Sugar Levels

(Q) My doctor says that my sugar level was 8.0. Can you tell me if this is very high or just above normal? (A) Usually blood sugar levels are tested in the 'fasting' state – when you have not had anything to eat or drink for eight hours. The normal range for fasting blood sugar is anything from 3.0 to 5.5 mmol/L. If you have not fasted, the normal range for random blood sugar is between 3.0 and 7.8 mmol/L. The body can usually keep the blood sugar within this range despite variations in food intake and energy expenditure, but if the blood test is done very soon after eating it is possible it may be slightly above. Other conditions which may temporarily cause increased blood sugar readings include acute infection, trauma and physical or psychological stress. In such cases the raised blood sugar may not be indicative of diabetes and the test should be repeated once the condition of circumstances have stabilised or resolved. If your blood test was done immediately after eating a large amount of carbohydrates or if you had a concurrent health condition or circumstances such as those described above, this might explain the result being mildly above the range for random glucose. But if your result of 8.0 was after fasting for eight hours this is very concerning as it could well indicate a diagnosis of diabetes. If you did not fast for your last test, your doctor may advise you to repeat the test and fast this time and hopefully it will be in range (below 5.5 mmol/L). If your level of 8.0 was already fasting your doctor may advise repeating the test (a fasting blood sugar that is repeatedly over 7.0 indicates a diagnosis of diabetes) and possibly doing a further test known as a 'glucose tolerance test' (GTT). With the GTT you have a baseline fasting blood sugar level done an Continue reading >>

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