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Diabetes Lancet Device

Diabetes Lancing Devices

Diabetes Lancing Devices

Tweet Lancing devices are used to obtain samples of blood for glucose testing using a lancet. A variety of lancets are on the market, the most common of which are automatic lancing devices. What are automatic lancing devices? Automatic lancing devices are the most common type of lancing device on the market, and are widely available and offered by a variety of manufacturers. Automatic lancing devices work using a spring-loaded lancet released by a button. The patient using the device can set the lancet to a certain level of skin penetration using a lancet cover. What are laser lancing devices? Laser lancing devices are designed to perforate the skin in order to draw blood, much in the same way as an automatic lancing device. A laser lancing device produces one pulse of laser, which makes a tiny hole in the skin. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset dia Continue reading >>

How Do I Use The Onetouch Lancing Device? :: Onetouch

How Do I Use The Onetouch Lancing Device? :: Onetouch

How do I use the OneTouch Lancing Device? Before you test your blood sugar, wash your hands and forearm (if applicable) thoroughly with warm, soapy water. Rinse and dry. Remove the blue (or black) cap by snapping it off Insert a sterile OneTouch UltraSoft Lancet into the OneTouch Lancing Device Insert the lancet into the holder and push in firmly. Twist the protective disk until it separates from the lancet and save the disk for later use. Do not twist the lancet. Please fill in a short form to ask a question or provide feedback. The health information on this Web site is for general background purposes and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific conditions. Seek prompt medical attention for healthcare questions you have. Consult your physician before making changes to your medication, diet, fitness program or blood glucose testing schedules. 1 The Meter Remote must not be exposed to water 1 Data on file. "OneTouch Ultra System Accuracy (2001 2009)", LifeScan Inc., 2010 1. Before you begin testing on your forearm or palm, read the User Guide and talk to your healthcare professional. To obtain the OneTouch AST Clear Cap, please call the OneTouch Customer Care line at 1 800 663-5521. 1. Before you begin testing on your forearm or palm, read the user guide and talk to your healthcare professional. To obtain the OneTouch UltraClear Cap, please call the OneTouch Customer Care line at 1 800 663-5521. *Allows for a less painful stick when used with the OneTouch UltraSoft Lancet. LifeScan Canada, 2017. All rights reserved. Trademarks are used under license by LifeScan Canada. The third party trademarks used herein are trademarks of their respective owners. LifeScan Canada, 2017. All rights reserved. Trademarks are used under license by LifeScan Canada. Continue reading >>

Lancet

Lancet

A pointed piece of surgical steel encased in plastic, used to puncture the skin on one’s finger (or other body part) to get a blood sample. Other types of lancets are used for making small incisions, as in the draining of boils and abscesses. Lancets for blood sampling are available in different gauges, which refer to the width of the metal point. The higher the gauge, the smaller the perforation the lancet makes. For example, a 23-gauge lancet makes a larger hole in your skin than a 30-gauge lancet does. Some people find the higher-gauge lancets less painful to use, but the trade-off is that it may be harder to get an adequate drop of blood with a higher-gauge lancet. While some people simply use a lancet alone to stick their fingers, many people prefer to use a lancing device. A lancing device uses a spring to drive the lancet into the skin and retract it very quickly. It also allows the user to change the depth of penetration depending on the thickness of the skin and calluses and the sensitivity of the fingertips. In this way, enough blood can be obtained without causing unnecessary pain. Usually, when you buy a blood glucose meter a lancing device is included. However, if the one that came with your blood glucose meter is too painful or doesn’t produce a big enough drop of blood, it is important to realize that there are many other lancing devices on the market. If you still have trouble getting an adequate drop of blood despite trying different lancets and lancing devices, diabetes educators suggest washing your hands with warm water, hanging your hand down by your side, or shaking your hand vigorously like a thermometer before lancing your finger. Each of these techniques can increase the blood supply to your fingertips. After puncturing your finger, gently Continue reading >>

Top 9 Diabetes Lancing Devices

Top 9 Diabetes Lancing Devices

Ensuring you keep your blood glucose levels well within your target range , is one of the most common goals for those with diabetes. You simply cannot monitor your blood glucose levels without using a lancing device that pricks your finger and allows you to measure using a drop of blood. While diabetes management can be challenging and at times overwhelming, determining which types of supplies and products to use should not be. With so many different products on the market you can begin to feel like there is no right answer on which you should be using. In this review, well discuss the available types of lancing devices , their benefits and why they might be the best fit for you. Lets take a look. The Care Touch Adjustable Lancing device is unique when compared to others on the market. It offers 10 adjustable depths to ensure you can get the blood sample you need. An included ejector button pushes out the lancet after it has been used so that you can replace it with a new one. It is compatible with most round types of lancets. Advanced technology offers precise delivery which allows for a less painful testing and a smaller blood sample. Bayers Microlet 2 Adjustable Lancing Device The Bayer Microlet Adjustable device gives you a comfort grip so that you can easily check your blood glucose whenever necessary. With five adjustable setting depths for your fingers. An easy grip gives you a precise and easy aim for smoother lancing. The ergonomic design means you will endure less painful testing with smaller blood samples for much easier testing. The Accu Chek FastClix lancing device is the only lancing device that features 1 click testing. The lancets for the FastClix are conveniently stored in an easy to replace drum. This means you do not have to individually load your la Continue reading >>

Smallest Lancet Device Just Released

Smallest Lancet Device Just Released

Taking blood samples may become a bit more convenient thanks to the advent of the Autolet Mini, the smallest lancet device on the market. Owen Mumford, the developers of the device, released the Autolet Mini in August. The Autolet Mini package offers two thumb-sized lancet devices and 10 ultra thin lancets for $5.95 (suggested retail), according to Michael Moore, retail marketing manager for Owen Mumford. The device is designed to fit into glucose meter cases and is compatible with most other lancet types. For more information, contact Owen Mumford at (800) 421-6936. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website. A few facts about me in case you are new to my column and site. My life in the diabetes community started at a young age as the secret keeper of my maternal and paternal Grandmothers. They both had type 2 diabetes and my days spent alone with them exposed me to their misunderstanding of how their diabetes really affected them. Eating candy bars, hiding the candy wrappers and smoking cigarettes seemed innocent enough to them. A decade later I married a type 1 person living with diabetes and experienced the full court of the diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetic Lancets & Accessories | Cvs.com

Diabetic Lancets & Accessories | Cvs.com

The product you are looking for might be discontinued. A lancet or blood lancet is a small medical implement used to acquire blood samples usually taken from a finger or on the arm and are designed to be disposable. Typically used by diabetics for blood glucose monitoring, lancing devices are medical instruments equipped with a lancet used to puncture the skin of the user. Some lancing devices allow the user to adjust the depth of penetration depending on the thickness of the skin or sensitivity to the fingertip, which may lessen the pain associated with extracting blood samples. When purchasing a blood glucose meter , a lancing device is typically included, however if the lancing device is causing too much pain or does not extract enough blood, consult your health care provider for recommendations of other lancing devices that may perform better. Not all lancets are the same. The ideal lancing device for you should be able to provide an adequate blood sample while causing the least amount of pain. This process may take some time before you find the right lancing device that meets your needs. When possible talk to someone who has experience with different lancing devices or consult with your health care provider for their recommendation. It is important to remember that dispose of the lancets properly. Due to the risk of blood borne pathogens, both the lancet and test strip should be disposed properly. Choosing the right lancet for you or a loved one can be a simple decision. At CVS Pharmacy, we have a wide selection of lancing devices and accessories from trusted brands. For additional information about choosing the right lancing device for you, visit your nearest CVS Pharmacy location or consult with your physician to learn more about what options are available. Continue reading >>

Blood Lancet

Blood Lancet

Box of disposable lancets. Blood-sampling device with a lancet at the tip. A blood lancet, or simply lancet, is a small medical implement used for capillary blood sampling. A blood lancet is similar to a small scalpel but with a double-edged blade or needle. Lancets are used to make punctures, such as a fingerstick, to obtain small blood specimens. Blood lancets are generally disposable. Lancets are also used to prick the skin in skin testing for allergies.[1] A blood-sampling device, also known as a lancing device, is an instrument equipped with a lancet. It is also most commonly used by diabetics during blood glucose monitoring. The depth of skin penetration can be adjusted for various skin thicknesses. Long lancing devices are used for fetal scalp blood testing to get a measure of the acid base status of the fetus. Blood sampling[edit] Main article: Capillary blood sampling The small capillary blood samples obtained can be tested for blood glucose, hemoglobin, and many other blood components. [edit] External links[edit] Lancet In Diabetes Self Management Continue reading >>

The Lifespan Of A Lancet

The Lifespan Of A Lancet

One Drop: Diabetes Management Made Simple Ask ten people with diabetes how often they change their lancet, and youll likely come away with ten different answers. Some people prefer to change their lancets with each use, some prefer a daily, weekly or monthly swap, and some go even longer. Out of all the diabetes to-dos, lancet changing practices probably vary the most person to person. The technical answer, according to manufacturers and most healthcare providers, is to change your lancet with each use. This is a precautionary recommendation meant to guard against painful fingersticks, changes in the skin, and infection. 1 , 2 , 3 However, home glucose testing has come a long way from when it first became available in the 1980s. Nowadays, meters require much smaller blood samples, lancing devices deliver shallower pokes, and we have better lancets. While its true that any needle used multiple times will become dull and require more force, many people do not notice a major difference after using the same lancet for multiple pokes. A simple rotation of fingerstick sites (use each side of the pad of the fingertip) can help guard against skin changes from dulling lancets. And, as long as lancets are used by only one person (whose hands are clean), the risk of infection is very low.(For what its worth, even a studyon syringe re-use concluded that diabetic patients frequently reuse disposable syringes, without apparent harmful effect.) In daily life with diabetes, sometimes theres no convenient place nearby to dispose of a used lancet. Sometimes there are no new lancets on hand to replace one weve just used. And, lets face it, sometimes we may just not want to. In the grand scheme of things, a fresh lancet is not as critical to your health and well-being as the many other se Continue reading >>

Lancing Device Love: Multiclix Vs. Delica

Lancing Device Love: Multiclix Vs. Delica

Pricking our fingers multiple times a day isn't exactly something most of us get excited about, but I've discovered that some folks out there do get excited about the lancing device they use. While most of us use the lancer that came for free with our meter (i.e. we don't give it much thought), there are a couple of brand-name models that really seem to get people talking. They are the ACCU-CHEK Mutliclix from Roche — which I see all the time at diabetes conferences — and the new OneTouch Delica, which Lifescan just released this past June. To have a closer look at these, I thought it would be fun to recruit a couple of "fans" to share their thoughts on why they like their respective device... who knows, maybe we'll get a couple of converts? Photo: Christopher of "Don't Fear Diabetes" Team Multiclix "The Multiclix truly is the best lancing device ever created. First of all, the lancing devices that came with my other meters (e.g. the UltraSoft) used 28 gauge lancets. The MultiClix comes with 30 gauge lancets. Higher number means smaller lancet, which means less pain. There are 11 depth settings on the Multiclix compared to the 5 depths on the other devices I was using. My Multiclix is currently set at .5 — the lowest setting possible, and I have no trouble getting an adequate size sample. I think, by far, the best part of the Multiclix technology and what sets it apart from the rest of the lancing devices is the use of a drum of preloaded lancets. With the other models (although the Delica offers some improvements in this area) there is nothing holding the lancet in place after you hit the trigger. The spring that triggers the lancet wobbles side-to-side as it moves toward your finger. Obviously, any movement as it enters your skin causes unnecessary pain. The dru Continue reading >>

4 Most Affordable Lancing Devices For Alternate Site Testing

4 Most Affordable Lancing Devices For Alternate Site Testing

Finger pricking can be a painful experience especially when done multiple times daily. One way to minimize the pain associated with finger pricking is to obtain your blood sample from another part of your body. This is called Alternative Site Testing (AST). Alternate Site Lancing Devices There are many lancing devices that allow you to obtain a blood sample from alternate sites. We have complied a list of 4 alternate site lancing devices that are both affordable and reliable. Stat TRIO Features Armed indicator Less than 95.5 mm in length Lancet ejector 5 depth settings Very compact – Less than 95.5 mm in length Easy to grip – ergonomic design Optional AST cap with patented depth adjustment* Multi-language instructions for use – English & Spanish Works with ALL STAT-brand lancets and the majority of available lancets on the market Stat Lite Features 5 depth settings Very compact – less than 3.5” in length Easy to grip – ergonomic design Optional AST cap with patented depth adjustment* Multi-language instructions for use – English & Spanish Works with ALL STAT-brand lancets and the majority of available lancets on the market EasyTouch Features Alternate Site Testing (AST) Adjustable Depth Ejector to proper dispose of Twist Lancets Vibration Control During Puncture to Reduce Pain For Use with the Most Common Lancets Specialty Medical Features Adjustable tip: 5 settings to allow customization of penetration. Lancet ejector: no need to touch the lancet to dispose of it. Clear cap: allows lancing device to be used for alternate site testing. Comfortable: compatible with most lancets available in the market. Why Alternate Site Testing? Blood samples for glucose testing are traditionally taken from fingertips because they contain a lot of capillaries that provide Continue reading >>

Lancets & Lancing Devices For Diabetes: Read This Before You Buy

Lancets & Lancing Devices For Diabetes: Read This Before You Buy

Lancets are small needles that are used to prick the skin to obtain a blood sample. Many lancets can be used with a lancing device that helps to make it more effective and less painful, however they can be used without one by just sticking the skin with the needle. Once a small blood sample is available, it can easily be put into a machine to run a test. As you can see from the image above, there are many different brands of lancets available. There are a few tests that can be done using a small drop of blood that the lancet provides. For people with diabetes, they can easily check their blood sugar levels. Using a glucometer, which is the machine that tests the blood sugar, they can quickly find out if their sugar is at a good number or not. How do the lancet and the lancing device work together Although the lancet can be used alone to get a sample, it is much easier to use the lancing device along with it. The device provides a quick “punch” of the needle into the skin to make an effective and less painful stick. OneTouch, which is a popular brand of diabetic supplies, has a device that is easy to use. Each brand’s device will be a little different, but the general idea is the same. The following steps demonstrate how to use the OneTouch device. Step 1. Always wash your hands before checking your blood sugar. If there is bacteria on your hands and it enters into your blood, it can cause a major infection! First, take the cap off of the device and insert a new lancet with the safety cap still on. (If it is removed first, you can poke yourself!) When you insert the lancet, do not twist it around. It should easily fit. See the image below for a better description. Step 2. Take the safety guard off of the lancet to expose the needle. This can easily be done by simpl Continue reading >>

Lancets And Lancing Devices

Lancets And Lancing Devices

Testing your blood is vital for good control. Not all lancets and lancing devices are created equal. Some are smaller, which means they hurt less for small children but might not provide an adequate drop for older kids. Some lancing devices are easier to use than others. Here's a list of reviewed products: Lancets Lancing Devices BDTM ULTRA-FINETM II BD GenieTM Soft Touch® ComforTouch Gentle-let 1 Softclix® Tenderlett® Unilet and Unilet GP Unilet Superlite Unistik® 2 ACCU-CHEK Multiclix The best lancing device available today auto-Lancet Adjustable and Mini (Also known as the Soft Touch adjustable) auto-Lancet (non-adjustable) (Also known as the Soft Touch) Penlet® Plus (also called the ONE TOUCH UltraSoft) Softclix® Glucolet Microlet Personal Lasette Laser Lancing Device Penlet II Soft Touch II Vaculance Lancets are where the metal meets the finger (or alternative site for most new meters). Many manufacturers say that their lancet is the "most comfortable." That really means "hurts less." Lancets are not much good without a lancing device to hold the lancet. The reviews evaluate each lancet and lancing device in the following areas: Comfort. Basically, how much does it hurt. Scores range from one (OUCH!) to ten (Whew!). Comfort is more than simply having a small diameter shaft. The quality of the grinding of the lancet makes a big difference, as does the quality and adjustability of the lancing device. Ease of Use. We all want our kids to do their own testing. Some products are easier for little hands to use than others. This mostly applies to the lancing devices, but some lancets are more troublesome than others. Scores range from one (Daddy, help!) to 10 (I can do it myself!). Safety. When you're done with the stick, you've got to dispose of the lancet. Some ha Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Lancing Devices For Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose Regarding Lancing Pain

Comparison Of Lancing Devices For Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose Regarding Lancing Pain

Go to: Abstract Self-monitoring of blood glucose empowers diabetes patients to effectively control their blood glucose (BG) levels. A potential barrier to frequent BG controls is lancing pain, intrinsically linked to pricking the finger several times a day. In this study, we compared different state-of-the-art lancing devices from leading manufacturers regarding lancing pain, and we intended to identify lancing devices that are less painful. First, 165 subjects compared 6 different BG monitoring systems—consisting of a lancing device and a BG meter—at home for 36 days and at least 3 BG tests per day. Second, the subjects directly compared 6 different lancing devices—independent from a BG meter—in a laboratory setting. The test results were collected in questionnaires, and lancing pain was rated on a numerical rating scale. One hundred fifty-seven subjects were included in the analysis. Accu-Chek BG monitoring systems were significantly (p ≤ .006) preferred to competitor BG monitoring systems and were rated by >50% of the subjects as “less painful” than competitor BG monitoring systems. Accu-Chek lancing devices were significantly (p < .001) preferred to competitor lancing devices and were rated by >60% of the subjects as “less painful” than competitor lancing devices. We found significant differences in lancing pain between lancing devices. Diabetes patients clearly preferred lancing devices that cause less lancing pain. In order to improve patient compliance with respect to an adequate glycemic control, the medical staff should preferentially prescribe lancing devices that cause less lancing pain. Keywords: lancing device, lancing pain, pain rating, self-monitoring of blood glucose Continue reading >>

3 Reasons Why This Lancing Device Is The Best

3 Reasons Why This Lancing Device Is The Best

In my 28 years of living with diabetes, I’ve used many different “pokers,” “prickers,” and “lancers.” Even the painful, dreaded “Guillotine” of the 1980’s. A few problems that many of them have is that they are limited to only holding one lancet, the lancets are open to the world when the cap is off, and, when it comes to design, some aren’t the most comfortable to hold and use. These problems are the main reasons why I turn to the Accu-Chek FastClix device as the love of my finger-poking heart. ***For the record, Accu-Chek did not pay us to write this post! We wrote it because we really love this lancing device!*** Multiple-Lancet Drums One of the key features of the FastClix device that I love is the drum. Following the prior design of the MultiClix, the drum carries 6 lancets, which not only reduce the amount of changes that the user will have to complete, but they also reduce the space taken in a travel kit. If the user tests roughly 6 times per day (also barring the scenario of using a new lancet with each test), they’ll only need one lancet drum in their kit per day. Less space, less waste. Closed, Contained Lancets With traditional lancets, whether they’re new or used, there is a risk of being poked by the exposed lancet; especially if one has been used, as there is no way to cap it as securely as they are when they are new. Not with the FastClix drums. No matter if the drum has been used or is brand new, the needles are contained, so the user will never have to see them, and there is virtually no risk at all of being poked. In fact, the only way to tell if the lancet drum has been used is the drum is locked so it can’t be reused, it’s longer, and there is a red mark on the side. Comfortable, Pen-style Design The pen-style design and Continue reading >>

How Fast Does Your Lancing Device Wear Out?

How Fast Does Your Lancing Device Wear Out?

How fast does your lancing device wear out? I was wondering how fast lancing devices wear out on average. Ive been using the Microlet 2 for about 4 years, but I have to replace it every 6 - 12 months, because the spring wears out. Is this normal? What are your experiences with other lancing devices? Before I started using the Medtronic pump and the Contour meter, I used the EasyTouch device from Abbott for a couple of months, but not long enough to discover how fast it wears out. By the way, in my opinion Abbotts FreeStyle lancets have a really good design. For safe disposal you can click the lancet cap on the lancet and it wont come off. Thats great when you are not at home and dont have access to a needle container. Microlet lancets dont have this feature, caps almost immediately fall of after putting them on the lancets. Which sometimes results in prick accidents. Ive been using the same one for about 5 years. I got it back in the day when my insurance company had a chronic disease management plan and they gave it to me for free. Its probably bottom of the barrel as cheap as they come, but it hasnt given up yet. Its also long and thin, about the size of a pen, so it fits in my D-bag really well (I dont use the cases the meters come in). Speaking of, I think Ill change my lancet today its been a while. The Multiclix and its newer version, the Fastclix , win every vote weve ever had here for comfort. Ive had these lancing devices for years, and have never had one break. Additionally, they use drums for the lancets. each drum has 6 lancets. There is no way to have an accidental poke when changing lancets or drums. Another vote for FastClix. When my daughter was first diagnosed this is what we got. Shed probably still be using that very same device if her dog, Dottie, d Continue reading >>

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