diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Kid Video

Diabetes Is On The Rise In America's Kids And Experts Don't Know Why

Diabetes Is On The Rise In America's Kids And Experts Don't Know Why

A new study is the first to look at diabetes diagnosis trends in America's youth. Video provided by Newsy Newslook The rate at which America's kids are diagnosed with diabetes is climbing and researchers don't know why. A first-ever study of new diabetes diagnoses of U.S. youth under age 20 found both Types 1 and 2 diabetes surged from 2002-2012. The diagnosis of new cases of Type 2 diabetes, associated with obesity, increased about 5% each year from 2002 to 2012, the study said, while new cases of Type 1, the most common form for young people, went up about 2% every year. The National Institutes of Health, which funded the study along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said the cause of the rise is "unclear." "These findings lead to many more questions," explained Dr. Barbara Linder, senior advisor for childhood diabetes research at NIH's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "The differences among racial and ethnic groups and between genders raise many questions. We need to understand why the increase in rates of diabetes development varies so greatly and is so concentrated in specific racial and ethnic groups." The study, published Friday in the New England Journal of Medicine, showed higher rates of diabetes diagnoses among minorities. Type 2 diabetes, which the CDC stated makes up about 90% to 95% of diagnosed diabetes cases, rose by 8.5% in Asian Americans ages 10-19. Blacks in the same age group saw a 6.3% increase, followed by a 3.1% bump in Hispanics and whites at fewer than a 1% increase. Hispanics saw the biggest rate increase of Type 1 diabetes with a 4.2% increase, followed by blacks at 2.2% and whites at 1.2% In terms of gender, girls and women 10-19 saw a 6.2% increase in Type 2 diabetes, while men and boys of Continue reading >>

Hey Kids, Learn About Blood Sugar And Diabetes

Hey Kids, Learn About Blood Sugar And Diabetes

Children and teens need to watch what they eat for a lot of reasons. One of them is that a healthy diet can help prevent diabetes, a dangerous disease that increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. Your digestive system breaks down foods and beverages that contain carbohydrates — like grains, fruits and vegetables — down into sugar. Certain foods, like whole grains, many fruits and vegetables and other high-fiber foods, take longer to digest. This helps keep the amount of sugar in your blood from going too high. But refined grains, potatoes and foods high in added sugar are digested fast and are quickly delivered into the bloodstream as sugar. If your blood sugar goes high too often, it can overwork your body’s ability to keep your blood sugar in healthy ranges, and you’re more likely to develop diabetes. What is diabetes? In diabetes, the body has problems either using or making a hormone called insulin. Insulin is important because it helps your body turn sugar and other food into energy. When the body doesn’t have enough insulin, it causes too much sugar to build up in your blood, which can cause damage to your heart and other parts of your body. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes means the body does not make enough insulin to function properly. It is the type of diabetes that occurs mostly in very young people and comes on very suddenly. Type 2 diabetes often develops in a person over time because of bad habits. Being overweight and not getting enough regular physical activity are two bad habits that can lead to developing diabetes. Teenagers are now starting to develop type 2 diabetes. Once a person has type 2 diabetes, they are at risk for problems with almost every part of their body if they don’t take good Continue reading >>

Kids & Diabetes In Schools

Kids & Diabetes In Schools

The KiDS project aims to foster a safe and supportive environment that creates a better understanding of diabetes and supports children with this condition. It also provides information about type 2 diabetes can be prevented by making effective lifestyle choices. Dr. Damodar Bachani, Deputy Commissioner (NCD), Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India shares the KiDS experience in India. We need to start investing now for a healthy and prosperous tomorrow. By leaving diabetes unmanaged, countries put economic and sustainable development at risk. Many children with diabetes face discrimination in the school environment, it affects their self-esteem, productivity and management of their disease. Children who are not able to manage their condition safely and securely at school may be at greater risk of complications from diabetes. We cannot afford to ignore the preventable risk factors and the affordable solutions for type 2 diabetes. Up to 70% of type 2 diabetes can be prevented by investing in healthy lifestyles. While type 1 diabetes cant be prevented, healthy eating is an important part of effectively managing it. The KiDS project and information pack will help tackle discrimination in schools and provides teachers and parents with a practical guide to diabetes management. The Kids and Diabetes in Schools (KiDS) project aims to foster a safe and supportive school environment that creates a better understanding of diabetes and supports children with this condition. It also provides information about how type 2 diabetes can be prevented by making effective lifestyle choices. Developed by healthcare experts, the Global Diabetes Information Pack for Schools provides teachers, parents and children with information on diabetes prevention and its management. Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes Videos Of The Year

The Best Diabetes Videos Of The Year

We’ve carefully selected these videos because they’re actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their viewers with personal stories and high-quality information. Nominate your favorite video by emailing us at [email protected]! Diabetes is a chronic disease caused by improper insulin function. This leads to overly high blood sugar. The three types of diabetes include type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. Prediabetes, where blood sugar is high but not over the diabetic threshold, increases your risk for type 2 diabetes. People of all ages, ethnicities and sizes can get diabetes. Nearly 50 percent of U.S. adults have diabetes or prediabetes, according to a 2015 study. This includes people living with diabetes who haven’t yet received an official diagnosis. Receiving a diabetes diagnosis can feel shocking or overwhelming. The illness has some serious potential complications, such as blindness and amputation. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Treatment often requires immediate and significant lifestyle adjustments. However, with careful management, you can still enjoy a varied diet and active lifestyle. There are plenty of people out there who refuse to let diabetes stop them from thriving. If you’re seeking some inspiration or information, look no further than these videos. 7 Best Superfoods for Diabetes - Saturday Strategy A healthy diet plays a huge role in managing diabetes. Drew Canole, CEO of fitlife.tv, shares insights into superfoods that help keep diabetes in check. Canole says these superfoods will help you regulate glucose levels and lower insulin levels. One such superfood is the Moringa leaf. He says studies have indicated it lowers blood sugar levels by up to 29 percent. Why not give his diabetes-bu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Parenting

Diabetes And Parenting

Tweet Being a parent of a child with diabetes can bring an awful lot to consider and the responsibility can be demanding. Remember, you are not alone. What diet should my son or daughter have? How will I manage his or her blood sugar levels? Will they get the right level care at school? How will my son or daughter cope with their own diabetes? We answer these questions and more and if you need more advice we have a specific Diabetes Forum for Parents and Children. Parenting guides Don't forget to take a look at the dedicated Diabetes and Kids section. Coming to terms with your child’s diabetes diagnosis As a parent of a child with diabetes, the diagnosis can often be a much harder blow for the parent than for the child. Your child’s diagnosis will likely come as a great shock and it can be difficult to recognise just how much of an effect it can have on you. Read about coping with diabetes diagnosis. What diet should my child have? A child with diabetes need not be prescribed a particular diabetic diet as such. However, through blood glucose testing you may find that some foods are better for your child’s blood glucose control than others. Testing before and around 2 hours after meals is a good way to see how different meals affect your child’s blood sugar. As with dietary advice for people in general, your child should have a balanced diet to include plenty of vegetables. Managing your child’s blood sugar control Watching out for hypos, being aware of hyperglycemia, monitoring and recording blood glucose levels and making sure they’re taking their doses are all involved as part of managing your child’s blood sugar. It can be a tall order at times but a little extra knowledge can go a long way. Should my diabetic child take part in sports? Sports are a gre Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Emily's Story

Type 1 Diabetes: Emily's Story

Emily Gold is a bright, spirited teen who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 8. Shortly after her diagnosis, Emily and her family organized Emily's Eagles to participate in the JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes and have walked every year since. From 2005 through 2010, Emilys Eagles has raised more than $21,000 to find a cure for diabetes. Emily and her family have done much more than walked and raised moneyto find a cure for diabetes. They have also produced a video posted on YouTube featuring Emily as actor and producer. Emilys mom helped edit the video and arrange for a guest appearance by Knuckles as the Diabetics cat. In the video, Emily describes her daily routine on an insulin pump. Emily is one of two children.Sheis a straight-A student who attends school in Mount Laurel, NJ. When she is not making YouTube videos, she enjoys drawing, sewing, dancing, spending time with friends, and taking care of her two cats, Knuckles and Ziggy. Emily also volunteers at the Animal Welfare Association shelter in Voorhees. As for living with type 1 diabetes , Emily notes that she tries to keep a positive attitude. She knows that taking the time to test her blood sugar, count her carbs, and make sure she's getting the proper amount of insulin is what keeps her healthy and feeling good. Diabetes hasn't stopped Emily from doing any of the things that she was able to do before she was diagnosed. She sees herself as a normal teenager. Emily's mom says: Emily has an amazing sense of humor that helps her and us going in tough times. One piece of advice that Emily would give to other kids with diabetes is to check outthe Children with Diabetes online community for good information about managing diabetes. She also recommends going to diabetes camp. Emily loves Camp Nejeda in Stillwater, Continue reading >>

Kids' Risk Of Diabetes Rises With Too Much Screen Time

Kids' Risk Of Diabetes Rises With Too Much Screen Time

Spending three or more hours a day watching TV, using computers, or playing video games could put kids at risk of type 2 diabetes, a study shows. More time spent staring at screens is associated with diabetes risk in adults — and it looks like the same is true for kids, too. Researchers in the UK analyzed data from nearly 4,500 children, and found that those who spent more time glued to the screen had biological markers known to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. These kids showed signs that their bodies weren't as good at processing sugar, a condition known as insulin resistance — the hallmark of diabetes. Today’s study, published in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood, adds to the growing body of research showing that “excessive screen time is harmful to people’s health,” says Mark Tremblay, a childhood obesity researcher and healthy living expert at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, who did not take part in the study. “It’s discordant with our evolution.” American kids are spending a lot of time in front of the screen. A report published in 2015 by Common Sense Media showed that 13- to 18-year-olds spend an average of about nine hours a day consuming media through computers, smartphones, and TVs; 8- to 12-year-olds get about six hours of screen time a day. “It appears that we’ve lost the balance that’s necessary for healthy living,” Tremblay says. Previous studies found that higher screen time is associated with increased Body Mass Index, a measure of body fat based on height and weight, in 9- to 16-year-olds. One study showed that spending lots of time watching TV increases the risk of type 2 diabetes in adults. The authors of today’s study wanted to see if the same is true for children, says stu Continue reading >>

Helping Kids Manage Diabetes With Video Games

Helping Kids Manage Diabetes With Video Games

Helping kids manage diabetes with video games Managing diabetes is not easy. It requires constant blood sugar monitoring, an insulin shot four to six times a day and strict eating habits. Its hard enough for adults to maintain the regimen, but getting young people to be disciplined about this kind of daily work is a job for, well, a video game. A new collaboration at the University of Michigan matches young video game designers from the Stamps School of Art & Design with medical experts at the University hospital in order to explore non-traditional, even fun, approaches to a serious problem. Dr. Joyce Lee, Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Michigan Medical School, treats adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes and is co-director of Mott Mobile Technology for Enhancing Child Health (M2TECH), which is dedicated to developing mobile apps that will help teens take better care of their health. We realized it was important to come up with new ways to motivate young people in their own care, because we want them to avoid diabetes-related complications, says Lee. And we realized we needed collaborators. We have the medical expertise, but what was missing was the creativity, the wonder, that artists and designers bring to a problem. Dr. Lee approached the Stamps School of Art & Design to seek out collaborators. There she discovered Matt Kenyon, a faculty member who specializes in code-based art/design and teaches popular classes in video game art and the new realm of creative apps. Matt joined the Stamps faculty in 2011 to enhance the Schools program in new media, as part of a university-wide cluster-hire in computational media designed to strengthen the universitys research in this growing area. Kenyon and Dr. Lee received a Third Century Initia Continue reading >>

Robots Interact With Children To Help With Their Diabetes

Robots Interact With Children To Help With Their Diabetes

Robots interact with children to help with their diabetes Robots interact with children to help with their diabetes Robots interact with children to help with their diabetes Diabetes is a serious challenge for many children and teenagers. Their well-being depends on various decisions that they have to take throughout the day. Can electronic games be of any help?reported euronews correspondent, Denis Loctier in this edition of Futuris. This robot helps kids with diabetes. Can kid-friendly hospitals foster healthier lifestyles? My #Futuris this March pic.twitter.com/c6yVUiljOA Denis Loctier (@loctier) February 10, 2017 Ilona lives in a small town not too far from Amsterdam with her husband and kids, Tatum and Arjan. Both Tatum, who is 11, and her brother Arjan, who is 13, have diabetes. The school is half an hour away by bike. So every morning a kid needs to think what hes going to eat during the day, and how much insulin is needed. They need to keep that in mind throughout the day to come back home safely, without getting low blood sugar somewhere on the way, explained Ilona Geurts. Tatum and Arjan are taking part in a European research project using electronic games to help children with diabetes.Special apps on their tablets train them to choose the right food, count carbohydrates and keep track of their activities in more of a fun way than books can ever do. Kids dont really read books that much anymore! We prefer playing with our smartphones, said Tatum while Arjan added: Yeah, books are a bit boring, tablets are much more fun. The research involves three hospitals and two diabetes organisations in Italy and in the Netherlands. On their clinical visits, kids can play with a robot programmed to be not just a trainer but a friend. It plays like a human, occasionally m Continue reading >>

6-year-old Teaches Kids How To Cope With Diabetes On Youtube

6-year-old Teaches Kids How To Cope With Diabetes On Youtube

6-Year-Old Teaches Kids How to Cope with Diabetes on YouTube Videos show what it's really like to live with Type 1 diabetes as a kidday in and day out. A 6-year-old records YouTube videos to teach other kids about Type 1 diabetes. Tim Crosby was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 2. That means he's been dealing with things, like needles, blood and insulin, on the daily ever since. Now the little guy is posting videos on YouTube to show other kids who've been diagnosed the ropes, and he has a huge following. More from News Break: Twin Is Born 5 Weeks after Her Brother Tim told WSPA-TV that he made his first video on a lark, as a way to keep busy while his siblings were napping. "Since my mom was in the shower, I thought 'Hmmm, I should do a diabetes video and help other kids ," he explained. More from News Break: The Force Is with This Couple and Their Baby in 'Star Wars' Photo Shoot So far, that original clip has been viewed nearly 8,000 times, and Tim has since added three other videos into the mix, all of which give viewers an honest look at what it's like to live with Type 1 diabetes as a kidday in and day out. And it's Tim's hope that by watching them, others will know they're not alone. More from News Break: Fans of 'Cards Against Humanity' Create a Version for Parents What an incredible kid! Instead of feeling sorry for himself, Tim took the hand he was dealt at such a young age and decided to help others cope. "Watching his videos makes me so happy to see that he has a good attitude," his mom, MaryAnn, said. "He knows he's different, but he's ok with it, and he wants to help anyone else who's like him." Even so, the impressive little dude is pretty taken aback by his viral success. "I'm just thinking it's very surprising," he said. " It means a lot to me ." C Continue reading >>

Kids With Diabetes Resources

Kids With Diabetes Resources

Information for Parents: Learning About Diabetes – provides visitors and health care professionals with simply written information on diabetes care. They try to use art and design in novel ways to help readers better understand diabetes. About Kids Health – Children health-related resources from the Hospital for Sick Children of Toronto Canada. They offer a very wide spectrum of thorough information on children physical and mental health issues. For information on Juvenile Diabetes in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, please refer to this link. Healthychildren.org – This website offers a great compilation of information by American Academy of Pediatrics. Here you will a lot of information about children’s health issues, childcare, and family well-being. For parents who have a busy life schedule, this website offers an audio playback function so that you can listen to the information while juggling with other duties. And to make the information available to Spanish speaking parents, all articles on this website can be translated into Spanish with one click of a button. For general information on Juvenile Diabetes, please click on this link. For information on Diabetes treatments, please click on this link. The Bump – A website catered to pregnant mothers and new parents. It covers topics related to pregnancy, baby and toddler care. ADA For Parents & Kids – The American Diabetes Association focuses on everything related to Diabetes. This area of org is catered specially to parents whose children have recently been diagnosed with Diabetes. Children with Diabetes – Offers a tremendous amount of information for children and parents about Diabetes. A Sweet life: The Diabetes Magazine – a great source of information on the latest news of Diabetes KidsHealth Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens

Diabetes In Children And Teens

Until recently, the common type of diabetes in children and teens was type 1. It was called juvenile diabetes. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose,or sugar, get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much sugar stays in the blood. Now younger people are also getting type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes. But now it is becoming more common in children and teens, due to more obesity. With Type 2 diabetes, the body does not make or use insulin well. Children have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if they are overweight or have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or are not active. Children who are African American, Hispanic, Native American/Alaska Native, Asian American, or Pacific Islander also have a higher risk. To lower the risk of type 2 diabetes in children Have them maintain a healthy weight Be sure they are physically active Have them eat smaller portions of healthy foods Limit time with the TV, computer, and video Children and teens with type 1 diabetes may need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes may be controlled with diet and exercise. If not, patients will need to take oral diabetes medicines or insulin. A blood test called the A1C can check on how you are managing your diabetes. Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Kid's Type 1 Diabetes

How To Manage Your Kid's Type 1 Diabetes

If your child has recently been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, your family will have a learning curve as you get the hang of proper care and a new routine. Your lives will change, but in time you'll get more comfortable with this "new normal." As you make adjustments, you can take comfort in knowing this autoimmune disease doesn’t have to limit your child. "Kids with diabetes can do everything other kids can do," says Andrea Petersen Hulke of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Hospitals offer educational courses that can give your family and caregivers the insight needed to help manage this new situation. The main change is learning to frequently check and adjust blood glucose levels (also called "blood sugar"). It may need checking 10 to 12 times a day. How much insulin your child needs will depend on the timing of meals, the types of food eaten, and her activity levels. It can take a bit of math skill to keep blood sugar levels within a healthy range. But it will get easier with practice. Even if you make a mistake, once you learn the symptoms of how your child reacts when her levels are too low or high, you’ll know how to fix it. "The math was freaky at first, but there are so many tools to help," says Lisa Sterling, who found out her daughter (now 17) had type 1 when she was 11. Logs, meters, and online trackers will help you stay on top of things. Insulin can be given by shots (syringe or pen) or by pump. Doctors often start with shots while families learn the basics. A pump is a small computer that gives a steady dose of insulin. You still need to track blood sugar levels to help the pump work right. You, your doctor, and child will decide together which device your child should use. "The goal is to manage diabetes around your child's life,” not the Continue reading >>

New Resource Helps Teachers Keep Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Safe

New Resource Helps Teachers Keep Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Safe

New resource helps teachers keep kids with type 1 diabetes safe Parents of kids with type 1 diabetes live in fear of their kids blood sugar dipping too low at school. A new resource is here to help. One day, when Trudy Adams son, Dylan, was lying down for his afternoon rest period in junior kindergarten , he began convulsing and lost consciousness. Dylan has type 1 diabetes , and this was exactly the kind of crisis his parents feared when they sent him off to school: Dylans blood sugar had dropped so low he needed a life-saving injection of a medication called glucagon, which wasnt on hand, since school personnel had been reluctant to learn how to administer it. Thankfully, Dylans dad, who got to school faster than the ambulances, was able to give the shot, and Dylan bounced back. Adams is one of many parentswho worries about their diabetic kid every day. One in every 300 Canadian kids has type 1 diabetes, and according to new survey data released by the Canadian Paediatric Society, the Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario, and the Hospital for Sick Children, nearly one-third of Ontario parents whose kids have the condition arent confident the school staff can keep their kids safe, and nearly 13 percent have to go to school at least once a week to monitor their childs care. However, a new online resource for parents and school staff should help prevent near-misses like Dylans, while providing peace of mind for the parents of kids with type 1. Intended to ensure kids with the condition can participate fully and safely in all aspects of school life, [email protected] features accurate, easy-to-digest lessons on topics like how to recognize and treat hypoglycaemia, as well as a just-launched series of engaging animated videos . All of the content carries the authority of h Continue reading >>

Books For Kids And Teens With Type 1

Books For Kids And Teens With Type 1

For children and teens with diabetes, feeling different can be as big a problem as having diabetes itself. Luckily there are several very good books whose main characters are children with diabetes. Children can read these books and view the videos and see that they aren't alone, and can learn that having diabetes isn't as hard as it might seem. Some are also excellent for teachers and classmates. The symbol and link indicates that the title is available for order on-line through Amazon.com. When you order through Amazon.com, we earn a small portion of the sale, which is used to help us deliver this web site to you. 487 Really Cool Tips for Kids with Diabetes by Spike Nasmyth Loy and Bo Nasmyth Loy. Published by the American Diabetes Association, 2004. ISBN 1-58040-191-0. 262 pages, $14.95. Looking for diabetes from a kid's perspective? Try 487 Really Cool Tips for Kids with Diabetes by Spike and Bo Loy, two young men who grew up as kids with diabetes. Parents will learn a lot about how our kids view living with diabetes, while kids and teens will have a chance to learn how other kids deal with everyday issues such as sports, Halloween, eating out, camp, travel, and heading off to college. Bo and Spike include ideas and experiences from many other kids of all ages, which makes the book all the more appealing. The final 100 pages are a "starting a pump" diary of sorts, which can help anyone who is unsure of what going on the pump is all about. Highly Recommended. All the Days of Her Life by Lurlene McDaniel. Published by Bantam Books, 1994. ISBN 0-553-56264-9. All the Days of Her Life, part of the One Last Wish series by Lurlene McDaniel, is an excellent book for young teenage girls. The book deals with diabetes and peer pressure related to eating. In the book, Lacey Duv Continue reading >>

More in diabetes