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Diabetes Itchy Skin

Diabetes Itchy Skin | No 8 Of 10 Early Symptoms Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Itchy Skin | No 8 Of 10 Early Symptoms Type 2 Diabetes

Early Symptoms Type 2 Diabetes – Skin Changes Diabetes itchy skin symptoms are often overlooked and not seen as early Type 2 diabetes symptoms since skin changes are sometimes considered to be normal. Itchy skin, particularly in the lower legs, can be caused by dryness, poor circulation, or yeast infections. Itching skin can also be called pruritus. The nerve damage caused by diabetes, called diabetic neuropathy, may stop diabetics from sweating. Decreased sweating can lead to dry skin. Poor blood flow, a common complication of diabetes can contribute to dry and itchy skin. Circulation problems that restrict blood flow to the legs and feet slow healing of the skin. High blood sugar causes the body to lose fluid. This occurs because the body is turning the water into urine to remove the excess sugar from the blood. The diabetes symptoms of frequent urination as well as dry and itchy skin are a result of this process. Dry skin can become itchy and can crack, causing you to scratch. Breaks in the skin allow germs to enter and cause infection. This can become a vicious cycle with skin that never heals properly. Since the skin is the largest organ in the body, it is important for your health and comfort to take care of your skin and take symptoms seriously. ‘ Prevent Skin Irritation Having healthy skin requires caring for its environment both inside and out. The most important thing you can do is regulate blood sugar levels in the normal range to prevent the symptoms and complications of diabetes. From the outside in, you can bathe or shower in warm water that is not too hot. This will help prevent dry and itchy skin. Use gentle cleansers or soaps and when you dry off – be gentle. Don’t rub your skin dry, just pat. Consider adding moisture to the air in your home wit Continue reading >>

​top Tips For Testicular Itching

​top Tips For Testicular Itching

Testicular itching can be easily managed. The Department of Dermatology, Singapore General Hospital (SGH) shares some tips on stopping the itch. There are many causes of the itch down there, but it is not advisable to use over-the-counter creams without a proper medical diagnosis. “It may be embarrassing to share your concerns about this uncomfortable itch,” says Dr Pang Shiu Ming, Senior Consultant, Department of Dermatology, Singapore General Hospital (SGH), a member of the SingHealth group. But more often than not, the cause of your testicular itching can be easily treated. What could be causing the itch? Actually, the term testicular itch is incorrect as the testicles are inside the scrotal sac and they don’t itch. What is commonly affected by an itchy rash is the skin of the scrotal sac and the groin. The pubic area, the shaft of the penis and the tip of the penis are less commonly affected. Types of itch that can affect the scrotal skin Eczema: “This is a chronic skin condition marked by itching, inflammation, redness, and swelling of the skin,” says Dr Pang. “While there’s no cure for eczema, it can be treated to prevent flare-ups.” Extramammary Paget’s disease of the scrotal skin is a skin cancer that may look similar to eczema. If an eczematous rash does not respond to treatment, this more serious condition is suspected. This rash sometimes involves the groin and the anal skin. Types of itch that can affect the groin Tinea cruris (dermatophyte infection – a kind of fungal infection also called jock itch): This is an itchy, irritable rash in the groin area that mostly affects men. It is typically associated with sweating and tight clothing. Dr Pang explains: “There is usually intense itching in the groin area. Sometimes, there might be a re Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Skin problems are often the first visible signs of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes can make existing skin problems worse, and also cause new ones. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that affects how your body absorbs glucose (sugar). This happens when the body either rejects insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level. While it’s most common in adults, some children and adolescents can be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and inactivity. While there is no cure, patients can manage their type 2 diabetes by eating well, exercising, and (in some cases) taking medications recommended by your doctor. Monitoring your blood sugar is also important. Sometimes even maintaining a healthy weight isn’t enough to manage this condition. In some cases, your doctor will determine that medication intervention is needed. Common treatments for type 2 diabetes include: insulin therapy (insulin “shots,” usually reserved for those who don’t do well with oral medications) sulfonylureas (medications that stimulate your pancreas to secrete more insulin) metformin (widely prescribed drug which increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin) DPP-4 inhibitors (medications which reduce blood sugar levels) Causes of Diabetes-Related Skin Problems Long-term type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) tends to reduce blood flow to the skin. It can also cause damage to blood vessels and nerves. Decreased blood circulation can lead to changes in the skin’s collagen. This changes the skin’s texture, appearance, and ability to heal. Damage to the skin cells can Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Exocrine Pancreatic Cancer

Signs And Symptoms Of Exocrine Pancreatic Cancer

The symptoms of exocrine pancreatic cancers and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are often different, so they are described separately. Having one or more of the symptoms below does not mean you have pancreatic cancer. In fact, many of these symptoms are more likely to be caused by other conditions. Still, if you have any of these symptoms, it’s important to have them checked by a doctor so that the cause can be found and treated, if needed. Early pancreatic cancers often do not cause any signs or symptoms. By the time they do cause symptoms, they have often already spread outside the pancreas. Jaundice and related symptoms Jaundice is yellowing of the eyes and skin. Most people with pancreatic cancer (and nearly all people with ampullary cancer) will have jaundice as one of their first symptoms. Jaundice is caused by the buildup of bilirubin, a dark yellow-brown substance made in the liver. Normally, the liver excretes bilirubin as part of a liquid called bile. Bile goes through the common bile duct into the intestines, where it helps break down fats. It eventually leaves the body in the stool. When the common bile duct becomes blocked, bile can’t reach the intestines, and the level of bilirubin in the body builds up. Cancers that start in the head of the pancreas are near the common bile duct. These cancers can press on the duct and cause jaundice while they are still fairly small, which can sometimes lead to these tumors being found at an early stage. But cancers that start in the body or tail of the pancreas don’t press on the duct until they have spread through the pancreas. By this time, the cancer has often spread beyond the pancreas as well. When pancreatic cancer spreads, it often goes to the liver. This can also lead to jaundice. Dark urine: Somet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Lead To Intense Itching

Diabetes Can Lead To Intense Itching

Question: Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled? Answer: Poorly controlled diabetes is one possible cause for unexplained itching. Exactly how diabetes causes itching isn't certain, but suggested causes include diabetic nerve root injury, metabolic abnormalities from widely fluctuating blood sugars, and dry skin. If this is the cause, it should improve with better efforts to lower the blood sugars. That said, there are many other causes for severe itching. Dry skin from eczema is a common cause that's fairly easy to treat with moisturizers and steroid cream/ointment. Cholestatic liver disease with high blood levels of bilirubin is another cause of severe itching. A normal set of liver enzyme tests will rule this out. Either a very slow or a very fast thyroid can cause itching, so be sure to check thyroid function. Severe chronic kidney failure can also cause itching from the buildup of toxins. High levels of circulating blood histamines from a tumor can cause itching, so be sure to check a blood histamine level. Folks who have a disorder called polycythemia vera may experience itching due to high circulating levels of histamine-producing mast cells. Certain cancers such as carcinoid syndrome or Hodgkin's/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma can cause extreme itching, so these need to be considered. Parasitic infections are another possible cause, especially after recent travel to endemic areas. Severe emotional stress/anxiety is one more interesting cause for unexplained itching I've encountered in my practice. Q: My blood pressure averages 120/60. I'm concerned about the bottom reading of 60 being too low. I seem to be rather drained, and wonder if it's because my pressure is too low. Is there any food or vitamin I ca Continue reading >>

Tag: Oat Bran For Diabetes,blood Sugar Levels Chart For Non Diabetics,itchy Skin And Diabetes

Tag: Oat Bran For Diabetes,blood Sugar Levels Chart For Non Diabetics,itchy Skin And Diabetes

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Below Is More Detail On How Diabetes Affects The Skin, Common Conditions And Pointers To Protect The Skin You’re In.

Below Is More Detail On How Diabetes Affects The Skin, Common Conditions And Pointers To Protect The Skin You’re In.

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including your skin. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association, about one-third of people with type 2 diabetes will develop a skin problem caused or affected by diabetes at some point in their lives. The statistics aren’t surprising considering that people with diabetes often suffer from nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy) that can lead to numb, injuryprone hands and feet, while poor circulation and high blood sugar slows down healing. There are some conditions that most anyone can have, such as bacterial and fungal infections and itching. However, people with diabetes are more prone to these and others including diabetic blisters, diabetic dermopathy [der-mop’ă-thē], small, round, brown atrophic skin lesions that occur on the shins of patients with diabetes, and eruptive xanthomatosis [zan’thō-mă-tō’sis], firm, yellow, pea-like skin growths. Most of these skin conditions can be treated with due diligence and a simple daily skin care routine, while others need treatment right away to prevent serious problems. Below is more detail on how diabetes affects the skin, common conditions and pointers to protect the skin you’re in. The Basics If you have diabetes, there are several basic steps you can take to prevent skin problems: Keep your diabetes well managed. When blood sugar levels run high, it causes the body to lose fluids and the skin to become dry, causing skin that may crack, itch and lead to infections. Moisturize your skin to prevent cracking and chapping, especially in windy or cold weather. Neuropathy can also lead to dry skin, as the nerves in the legs and the feet may not get the message to sweat, which is necessary to keep the skin soft and moist. So, the main message is moisturize, moistu Continue reading >>

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Everyone knows about the major long- and short-term complications of diabetes. But what many newly-diagnosed patients might not realize, is that skin conditions often come with having diabetes. My first exposure to skin conditions was a fungal infection. I can remember saying to the trainer that I could not have a fungal infection because my A1c was 6%. A specific over-the-counter anti-fungal ointment stopped the fungal infection process, and now I travel with this small tube just in case. I use it in the summer when I'm in the water and I develop itchy skin on my upper shoulder always in the same place. It's gone, and I'm happy. First, we want you to know that people who do not have diabetes get these skin conditions also, but as with many other complications, we tend to get them more often. About one-third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time. In fact, doctors report noting the presence of skin disorders before they diagnose diabetes. Second, if you think you have one of the skin conditions outlined in this article, please see your physician right away. Don't wait. Finally, we end this article with some easy ways to protect your skin when you have diabetes (either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes). Skin Conditions that Can Affect People with Diabetes Bacterial Infections: People with diabetes appear to suffer more bacterial infections than the general population. There are several kinds of infections that can affect those of us with diabetes. One is a sty, which is an infection of the glands of the eyelids. A second type is a boil, which are infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. We all know bacterial i Continue reading >>

What's Itching You?

What's Itching You?

Becky Easterly, RPh - Norton Location Q: I work outside for a living and as the weather gets colder my hands get dry and crack terribly. What do you recommend to make them better? A: The most important thing to do is to protect your hands with gloves from the harsh cold and wind when you are outside. Wash your hands with nondrying soaps or moisturizing cleansers in warm water. Pat your hands dry with a towel and apply a thick moisturizing cream, like Eucerin. For healing terribly, cracking hands, apply petroleum jelly to the hands and wear white cotton gloves at bedtime. Q: How do I know if I have Eczema or if it's just dry skin? A: The word eczema is a general term for inflammation of the skin, known as dermatitis. Eczema causes dry, reddened patches and generally the first symptom is intense itching. Other symptoms of eczema may vary from blisters and oozing lesions to dry, scaly skin. There are four goals when treating eczema: control the itch, heal the skin, prevent flare-ups, and prevent infection. Topical corticosteroids, like hydrocortisone 1% cream and oral antihistamines, like Benadryl®, are great over-the-counter products to help control itching. Cerave® is an example of an excellent moisture barrier cream available without a prescription to help heal and retain moisture in the affected skin. For more stubborn, hard to treat eczema, your physician can prescribe medication for your specific case. Prescription products for eczema can be topical or oral corticosteroids, topical immunomodulators, immunosuppressants, and antibiotics if needed. There are many treatment options available depending upon the severity of the affected area. Seeking the help of a health care professional when in doubt, can help prevent infection and assist you in healing your skin. Q: M Continue reading >>

Skin Conditions That Mostly Affect People With Diabetes

Skin Conditions That Mostly Affect People With Diabetes

ALSO READ: Kenya bans shisha, Sri Lanka amends 60-year-old law to permit sale of alcohol to its women A common disease in the country now, diabetes is a serious ailment that can affect different parts of the body including the skin. In some cases, unusual skin conditions can be the tale sign that one is suffering from diabetes. Some of the skin conditions suffered by people with diabetes are common and can occur to almost anyone. These include itching, bacterial and fungal infections. However, some skin conditions mostly affect those suffering from diabetes. 1. Atherosclerosis This is a condition that is caused by the narrowing of blood vessels. The narrow blood vessels cause insufficient supply of oxygen to the skin. Symptoms of atherosclerosis include cold skin, hair loss, thinning and shiny skin as well as thickened and discolored toenails. Legs and feet affected by the condition heal slowly as the narrow blood vessels also affect supply of the white blood cells. 2. Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum NLD is another condition caused by change in blood vessels. It manifests as a dull, red, raised area on the skin which later appears as a shiny scar with a violet border. NLD can be itchy and painful and sometimes the sores break open. It is a rare condition that is more common in adult women. You do not need to have it treated unless the sores break open. 3. Acanthosis Nigricans This skin condition causes darkened, thickened skin. Tan or brown skin that is slightly raised usually appears on the sides of the neck, groin and armpits. It may also occur on elbows, hands and knees. It especially affects people who are overweight. To curb it without much treatment, losing weight is a good start to healing. 4. Digital Sclerosis This is a skin condition that affects about a thi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Care: 10 Ways To Soothe Dry, Itchy Skin

Diabetes Self Care: 10 Ways To Soothe Dry, Itchy Skin

Not only is dry skin uncomfortable, but scratched or cracked skin is also susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections – common medical complications for those with diabetes. Although eating well and managing your blood sugar is the first line of defense against dry skin, it is often not enough. Taking lukewarm baths or showers using mild, unscented soaps and shampoos may mitigate but not prevent rough, flaky skin. One remedy is migrating to a more tropical climate where the air is heavy with moisture year-round. If that is not an option, try one (or more) of the following ideas to help soothe and rehydrate your dry skin. 10 Ways to Soothe Dry Skin Make a point of getting plenty of healthy fats in your diet, including omega-3 fatty acids. Excellent sources of omega-3s are flaxseeds and flaxseed oil, eating fatty fish such as salmon, fish or krill oil supplements, walnuts, tofu, chia seeds, fresh basil, and spinach. The ideal time to moisturize the skin is after a bath or shower, while the skin is still moist. Frequently recommended lotions are Lubriderm, Cetaphil, Gold Bond, and Curel. For severely dry skin thick, greasy emollients are an option including Aquaphor, Vaseline, Crisco, and SBR Lipocream. Moisturizers containing lactic acid (e.g., Amlactin, Lac-Hydrin) or urea (e.g., Urix, Crmol) may help. Bear grease is likely effective too, but hard to find on store shelves. During the cold, dry months humidify your home, particularly the rooms where you spend most of your time such as the bedroom and family/living room. Extra virgin olive oil can help soften dry skin and keep it moist. Try dabbing a thin layer of the oil on your skin before applying your regular moisturizer. Another option is to massage olive oil into the dry areas of your body about 30 minutes befor Continue reading >>

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

Prev NEXT Diabetes is a complex disease, affecting many parts of the body. Some of the problems of the disease can be relieved with simple things right from the kitchen, though. And for a person with diabetes, a little relief never hurts. Home Remedies From the Cupboard Olive oil. Studies indicate this may reduce blood-sugar levels. Use it in salad dressing or wherever cooking oils are indicated. For an inexpensive and easy no-stick olive oil spray-on coating, buy an oil mister in any department store kitchen supply area and use it to spray your pans before cooking. Remember: As with all oils, olive oil is high in calories, and being overweight places you at risk for diabetes. Limiting the amount of olive oil by using the oil mister is a good way to control the calories. Peanut butter. After you've experienced an episode of low blood sugar and corrected it, follow up with a protein and carbohydrate snack. Peanut butter on a couple of crackers supplies both, and it's easy to fix when you may still feel a little jittery. Just avoid brands that contain added sugar, glucose, or jelly. Plastic container. If you're on insulin, keep your extra vials in the refrigerator. Designate a spot where your insulin bottle won't freeze, yet is away from the food. Then keep the vial in a plastic container, preferably one that shields it from light, in that spot to keep it from rolling around or getting knocked aside or misplaced. If the insulin bottle is frosted or the insulin clumps, do not use it. Consult your pharmacist and the package insert for information about proper storage. Salt. Dry, itchy skin is a side effect of diabetes, and soaking in a tub of salt water can be a great itchy skin reliever. Just add 1 cup table salt or sea salt to your bathwater. This solution will also softe Continue reading >>

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

Edit Article Three Methods:Stopping the Itch with Lifestyle ChangesStopping the Itch with Home RemediesStopping the Itch with MedicationCommunity Q&A Diabetics frequently experience horrible itching. It is a common side effect of elevated blood glucose levels, which is the defining factor of diabetes. If you suffer from unbearable itchiness, this wikiHow article explains ways that you can soothe your irritated skin. 1 Prevent skin from getting dry. Keep your skin moist and healthy by using moisturizers and skin creams. Avoid scented creams and lotions, BECAUSE you could have a reaction to them, causing more itching. Moisturize twice a day. Every time you shower, use one ounce or two tablespoons to moisturize your whole body, or use as needed.[1] You should also avoid using scented soaps BECAUSE the chemicals in it can cause skin to get dry and irritated. Use mild, unscented soaps instead. 2 Change your bathing style. Too frequent bathing can cause itching to get worse. Limit baths to once every 2 days. Bathing frequency can vary depending on climate, weather and your activities. However, once in two days should suffice. Avoid using very hot water; it tends to make the skin more irritated. Use water at room temperature or lower. Hot water dilates vessels speeding up metabolism of insulin, which can trigger hypoglycemia.[2] Another reason why diabetics should not use hot water is diabetics suffering from nerve damage lose sensitivity to pain and temperature and may unknowingly burn themselves with hot water. 3 Care for your skin in the summer. Summer is a time of sun and fun, but sun can also seriously irritate skin. To lessen itching in the summer, wear clothes made from light materials like cotton, chiffon or linen. Certain cloths like wool and silk can cause irritation Continue reading >>

Diabetes Patients Have Increased Risk Of Skin Problems

Diabetes Patients Have Increased Risk Of Skin Problems

Diabetes can affect all parts of your body, even your skin. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), as much as 33 percent of diabetes patients will have a skin disorder in their lifetimes. Fortunately, skin complications can be prevented. For some people, skin problems are the first sign of diabetes. They may develop a skin problem that anyone can have, such as fungal or bacterial infections. However, some skin problems occur mostly or only in people with diabetes. Regardless of the cause of the condition, people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing skin problems. Through keeping a close eye on your body and working with your doctor, you can prevent diabetes-related skin complications. And if you catch a skin condition early, it can often be easily treated. General Skin Complications Bacterial Infections There was a time when bacterial infections could be deadly, especially for people with diabetes. In this day and age, death is uncommon, mainly due to the creation of antibiotics and better ways for patients to control their blood sugar. Still, bacterial infections are more common in people with diabetes than the rest of the population. Luckily, good skin care can lower the risk of getting an infection. Examples of bacterial infections affecting diabetes patients include: styes, or infections of eyelid glands boils folliculitis, or hair follicle infections carbuncles, or deep tissue skin infections infections around the nails Bacterial infections are caused by organisms, or living creatures. The most common infection-causing organism is Staphylococcus - a bacteria also known as staph. Affected skin is often hot, swollen, red and painful. Fungal Infections People with diabetes have an increased risk of fungal infection. In most cases, diabetes Continue reading >>

Surprising Symptoms Of Prediabetes

Surprising Symptoms Of Prediabetes

One of the best ways to prevent diabetes is to spot blood sugar (glucose) problems before the full-blown disease develops. But most people don’t realize that diabetes — and its precursor, prediabetes — can cause no symptoms at all or a wide range of symptoms that often are misinterpreted. Common mistake: Because diabetes is strongly linked to excess body weight, many people who are a normal weight assume that they won’t develop the disease. But that’s not always true. About 15% of people who are diagnosed with diabetes are not overweight. And paradoxically, even weight loss can be a symptom of this complex disorder in people (normal weight or overweight) who have uncontrolled high glucose levels. Shocking new finding: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now estimates that 40% of Americans ages 40 to 74 have prediabetes, and nearly two out of three Americans over age 65 have prediabetes or diabetes — most likely due to the increasing numbers of people who are overweight and inactive, both of which boost diabetes risk. However, most primary care doctors aren’t diagnosing and treating prediabetes early enough in their patients — often because they fail to order the necessary screening tests. And because the symptoms of prediabetes can be subtle, especially in its early stages, most people are not reporting potential red flags to their doctors. Fortunately, prediabetes can virtually always be prevented from progressing to diabetes if the condition is identified and treated in its early stages (by following a healthful diet, exercising regularly and taking nutritional supplements and medications, if necessary). Being overweight (defined as having a body mass index, or BMI, of 25 or higher) is perhaps the best-known risk factor for diabetes.* The mo Continue reading >>

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