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Diabetes Is A Metabolic Disorder

What Percentage Of The Us Population Has Proven And/or Suspected Metabolic Disorders?

What Percentage Of The Us Population Has Proven And/or Suspected Metabolic Disorders?

The answer really depends on your definition of a metabolic disorder: The World Health Organization recognizes it differently from the International Diabetes Federation, is different from The American Heart Association. No one really seems to agree on what it is. Definition of Metabolic Syndrome: Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/American Heart Association Conference on Scientific Issues Related to Definition The fact that there is no formal definition for what a metabolic disorder actually is, means that it's really hard to get any kind of formal statistics on it. The stats change depending on what definition you use. Plus as much as we'd like to believe we understand it in great detail, we're really only at the tip of the iceberg. Honestly, the term is a bit of a garbage term until it's defined. Garbage term meaning that people love to throw it around loosely like it means something serious, but it doesn't really mean anything and can be used to reference a ton of vague circumstances depending on who you talk to. On one hand you can say that anyone with diabetes has a metabolic disorder. That's 10% of the US population, and about 25% of the population over 65 according to the American Diabetes Association. Considerably more if you also include how many people are 'pre-diabetic.' On the other hand, obesity often gets thrown into this realm as well, which we know seems to affect about 50% of the US population, give or take. Anyone with Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) could also be considered a metabolic disorder. So all the people with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD), Hypertension (high blood pressure), High Cholesterol (or unbalance cholesterol), etc...etc... This is about another 10-12% of the US population. Anyone with a messed up hormonal or blood Continue reading >>

Why Do American And European Men Have Flat Abs While Indians Have Pot Bellies?

Why Do American And European Men Have Flat Abs While Indians Have Pot Bellies?

The question says pot bellies and not obesity. Although the terms are mostly interchangeably used, there is an extremely specific reason why we Indians are more prone to have pot bellies. According to this, genes that aided in survival during adverse conditions, became detrimental in states of energy excess. Our ancestral populations, have been subjected to repeated long spells of famine. Our genes got used to the malnourishment and got to work in such a way, that we always store a little fat around the belly. It was our safety mechanism; to prevent us from dying. These genes were passed down to us, ultimately making us the proud bearers of little round sacks of adipose. So now, when there are no famines, and excessive amount of food, this same defense mechanism has become our bane, by contributing towards diabetes and other metabolic disorders. Yep. You can legit blame it on the genes! Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Infectious?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Infectious?

No, type 2 diabetes is not infectious. If it wаѕ аn infectious disease, passed frоm оnе person tо another, public health officials wоuld ѕау we’re in thе midst оf аn epidemic. Thiѕ difficult disease, оnсе called adult-onset diabetes, iѕ striking аn ever-growing number оf adults. Evеn mоrе alarming, it’s nоw beginning tо show uр in teenagers аnd children. Mоrе thаn 24 million Americans hаvе diabetes; оf those, аbоut 6 million don’t knоw thеу hаvе thе disease. In June of 2015, it was discovered that I had type 2 diabetes, By the end of the month, I was given a prescription for Metformin, I stated the ADA diet and followed it completely for several weeks but was unable to get my blood sugar below 140, With no results to how for my hard work, I panicked and called my doctor, His response? Deal with it. I began to feel that something wasn’t right and do my own research and found Control Your Blood Sugar Level. The good news is that sticking to the plan can help and feel healthy. Continue reading >>

Is There Any Harm In Eating Three Yolks A Day, Twice A Week, Instead Of One Yolk A Day, Every Day?

Is There Any Harm In Eating Three Yolks A Day, Twice A Week, Instead Of One Yolk A Day, Every Day?

The connection between dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol in general is pretty weak, especially if you don't have a metabolic disorder but for your case in particular: no, your plan isn't going to do you any harm. In fact, medical advice on eggs is often given in terms of eggs-per-week rather than per day. If you do have some sort of metabolic disorder (heart disease, diabetes, arteriosclerosis) you need to get a doctor's advice on your diet in general, which will include recommendations about eggs in particular. That's not something you can self-diagnose; you should have regular checkups. But as long as you're basically healthy, there's nothing wrong with the three-egg omelette. I suppose trying to eat a weekly supply of seven eggs all at once would be pushing it... but really, that's just because moderation is good in general. Three is on the large side, but not ludicrous. There is no connection between dietary cholesterol and your blood cholesterol. Furthermore, most recommended dietary intakes only really matter as a long term average anyway, so if you're maintaining the same amount per week there would be no practical difference between the two approaches. On eggs in particular: I have personally gone for weeks of eating 3 to 9 eggs a day, everyday. It didn't affect my cholesterol levels much. A study done not long ago by some Collegiate body or another (Google it!) showed that three whole eggs every day did not increase cholesterol levels over the course of a six month study. What that means for you is that instead of worrying about a few eggs getting lumped together in a single day, you can actually eat a few eggs EVERY day and get your protein and B Vitamins in good levels daily. Also, as many other answers have indicated, there's no real link between cho Continue reading >>

How Effective Is Penicillin For Treating Diabetes?

How Effective Is Penicillin For Treating Diabetes?

Penicillin is an antibiotic and is meant to cure a bacterial infection. It has nothing to do with treating diabetes. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder and is NOT an acute disease that can be treated with a single medication. It is a dietary disorder that can be effectively reversed with a healthy, holistic diet and an active lifestyle, along with stress management techniques. Continue reading >>

With Straight Science Facts, Why Is Diabetes Mellitus Considered A Metabolic Disorder?

With Straight Science Facts, Why Is Diabetes Mellitus Considered A Metabolic Disorder?

Metabolism refers to the way our bodies use digested food for energy and growth. Most of what we eat is broken down into glucose which is the principal source of fuel for our bodies. However, glucose cannot enter our cells without insulin being present - insulin makes it possible for our cells to take in the glucose. Insulin is a hormone that is produced by the pancreas. After eating, the pancreas automatically releases an adequate quantity of insulin to move the glucose present in our blood into the cells, as soon as glucose enters the cells blood-glucose levels drop. A person with diabetes has a condition in which the quantity of glucose in the blood is too elevated (hyperglycemia). This is because the body either does not produce enough insulin, produces no insulin, or has cells that do not respond properly to the insulin the pancreas produces. This results in too much glucose building up in the blood. This excess blood glucose eventually passes out of the body in urine. So, even though the blood has plenty of glucose, the cells are not getting it for their essential energy and growth requirements. Continue reading >>

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic Syndrome

Tweet Metabolic syndrome is becoming increasingly common. It occurs when a range of metabolic risk factors such as obesity and insulin resistance come together. Metabolic syndrome increases one's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A number of alternative terms exist to describe the condition, such as syndrome X, Reaven’s syndrome and in Australia, CHAOS. What are the risk factors for metabolic syndrome? The set of risk factors for metabolic syndrome generally include: Obesity - generally in the abdominal region. Outwardly, this is manifested as excess fat tissue in and around the abdomen of the person Insulin resistance or intolerance to glucose - this means that the body cannot properly use blood sugar or insulin Proinflammatory state - higher amounts of C-reactive protein in the blood Prothrombotic state - higher amounts of fibrinogen or plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 present in the bloodstream Atherogenic Dyslipidemia - disorders in the blood fat, with high levels of ‘bad' cholesterol and low levels of ‘good’ cholesterol Higher blood pressure People who suffer from metabolic syndrome are at a much greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes as well as other diseases. What are the symptoms of metabolic syndrome? You may recognise some of the following symptoms of metabolic syndrome: Tiredness - particularly after meals Inability to focus properly - ‘brain fog’ Acanthosis nigricans - browning (hyperpigmentation) of folds of skin such as on the neck, armpits, groin and between the buttocks Most commonly, patients suffering from metabolic syndrome will exhibit two major symptoms: Abdominal obesity Diagnosis of metabolic syndrome An accurate form of diagnosis is not yet universally accepted. Some experts believe that a combination of three of the following Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: From A Metabolic Disorder To An Inflammatory Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: From A Metabolic Disorder To An Inflammatory Condition

Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus, a life style disease affecting 8.3% of the adult population of the world and increasing at an alarming rate, is one of the most common non-communicable diseases of current era[1]. The burden of this disease is immense owing to transition in lifestyle and dietary habits, ageing of the population and urbanization in the setting of a genetically predisposed environment[2]. The fact that the number of subjects with diabetes mellitus has doubled over the past three decades has made this disease a global challenge[3]. The number of diabetes mellitus patients is projected to increase from 382 million in 2013 to 592 million by 2035, denoting a net increase of 55%[1]. The predominant form is type 2 diabetes (T2D) which accounts for nearly 90% of all diabetes cases. Diabetes mellitus-not so sweet T2D is a metabolic disorder characterized by insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction as a consequence of unsettled hyperglycemia[4,5]. In response to nutrient spill over in the setting of insulin resistance and eventual β-cell dysfunction, the general fuel homoeostasis of body is altered[2]. Insulin resistance in target tissues and a relative deficiency of insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells are the major features of T2D. β-cell hyperplasia and hyperinsulinaemia in response to insulin resistance occur in the preclinical period of disease. Relative insulin deficiency as a consequence of failure of β-cells to compensate for insulin resistance, progresses into overt T2D[6]. Metabolic alterations associated with T2D are well characterised by epidemiological and research based studies. The pathogenesis and progression of T2D is ascribed to four mechanisms; increased advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation, increased polyol Continue reading >>

Why Is Diabetes Mellitus Referred To As Metabolic Disorder?

Why Is Diabetes Mellitus Referred To As Metabolic Disorder?

Diabetes Mellitus means the complications caused by deficiency of a hormone(chemicals that helps to maintain balance in our body systems) named “insulin” which is produced by pancreas. Insulin decreases glucose level in our blood, by storing excess of glucose in liver and muscles as well as helping muscles and other tissues to utilize more glucose. Talking about “glucose”, glucose is the main energy for all the cells and tissues. All the metabolism that happens in our body needs energy, and glucose provides those energy by a series of a reaction. So in diabetes either “insulin” production is decreased due to several reasons or the cells of our body stops responding to insulin. In either case, the glucose utilization by cells are hampered and many metabolic activity cannot take place. So it is called a metabolic disorder. :) Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Thing You Can Do At Age 30 To Benefit Your Life At Age 50 And Beyond?

What Is The Best Thing You Can Do At Age 30 To Benefit Your Life At Age 50 And Beyond?

You asked for one, but I'm going to give you five to cover various aspects of your life - physical, mental, emotional/spiritual, social, and financial. 1) Physical -- Find one or two exercises that you actually enjoy doing Anyone can tell you to run, lift, do yoga, bike, do Crossfit, etc, but if you truly don't enjoy it, you'll never develop a lifelong habit. I've tried just about every type of exercise over the past 30 years, until I discovered what works best for me and my body: yoga, swimming, and walking. I do all three just about everyday, because I enjoy them and they make my body feel good. 2) Mental -- Develop a love of reading Set aside at least 30 minutes every day to read something (and I'm not talking about a blog or social media post). I'm talking about an actual book -- it can be fiction or non-fiction, hard copy or electronic. The more you read, the more you learn, understand other viewpoints, and develop your curiosity and creativity. 3) Emotional / Spiritual -- Learn to meditate They say there are only two things in life that are certain - death and taxes. Well, I say there's a third - stress. No matter how privileged your life may be, you will find yourself under stress. There are too many things outside your control that cause stress -- the weather, politics, terrorism, asteroids, diseases, you name it. The best way to deal with all this stress is to know how to calm and center your mind, and the best way to do that is with a daily meditation practice. 4) Social -- Live in SF or NYC & Travel Two things I'd highly recommend that you do by age 30 are 1) live in a cosmopolitan city like New York City, San Francisco, Paris, Rome, etc, and 2) travel as much as you can. Both things will help you understand other cultures, types of food, belief systems, and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (dm)

Diabetes Mellitus (dm)

Years of poorly controlled hyperglycemia lead to multiple, primarily vascular complications that affect small vessels (microvascular), large vessels (macrovascular), or both. (For additional detail, see Complications of Diabetes Mellitus.) Microvascular disease underlies 3 common and devastating manifestations of diabetes mellitus: Microvascular disease may also impair skin healing, so that even minor breaks in skin integrity can develop into deeper ulcers and easily become infected, particularly in the lower extremities. Intensive control of plasma glucose can prevent or delay many of these complications but may not reverse them once established. Macrovascular disease involves atherosclerosis of large vessels, which can lead to Immune dysfunction is another major complication and develops from the direct effects of hyperglycemia on cellular immunity. Patients with diabetes mellitus are particularly susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections. Continue reading >>

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