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Diabetes Intermittent Fasting

5:2 Fasting Diet

5:2 Fasting Diet

Tweet The 5:2 intermittent fasting (IF) diet, more commonly referred to simply as the 5:2 diet, has become one of the more popular diet plan in recent years. Studies have shown that the diet helps with weight loss and may also reduce insulin resistance, both of which are of particular interest for many people with type 2 diabetes or borderline diabetes. One reason for the popularity of the diet is that it allows a certain amount of flexibility, in comparison to low calorie diets, on most days of the week. Theory behind the diet The idea of the diet is that short periods of fasting prompt the body to repair damage but not enter a starvation mode of conserving energy. Whilst the theory has yet to be conclusively proved, clinical studies have shown promising results for the diet, however it has only been examined over relatively short time spans, of less than a year. How the 5:2 diet works The 5:2 intermittent fasting diet is based on a simple idea. 5 days a week you stick to meeting the daily calorie intake advised for people of a healthy weight, that being: 2,500 kcal per day for men 2,000 kcal per day for women For the other 2 days each week, the diet stipulates that you have only around 25% of the values above, which is equal to: 600 kcal on these days for men 500 kcal on these days for women The fasting days can be taken at any time during the week as long as you do not take 2 fasting days consecutively. Benefits of the 5:2 diet Clinical studies have shown that the benefits of intermittent fasting are largely similar to those of a calorie restricted diets. The most commonly reported benefits among people from following the 5:2 diet: Research has shown that periods of fasting can help to improve life expectancy and decrease risks of diseases including nerve disorders, Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting Boosts Hypoglycemia Risk In Type 2 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting Boosts Hypoglycemia Risk In Type 2 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting Boosts Hypoglycemia Risk in Type 2 Diabetes A new study has found that intermittent fasting increases hypoglycemia among type 2 diabetes patients. This was found true for patients who used hypoglycemic medications. However, fasting was also connected with improvements in HbA1c, weight, and quality of life. This study followed a trial of 41 adults with type 2 diabetes. The participants all had BMI levels of 30-45 and took either hypoglycemic medications or metformin. Patients were randomly assigned to fast for either two consecutive or non-consecutive days per week for 12 weeks. Over the course of the observation, 53 hypoglycemic events were noted. These findings highlight the need for cost-effective, safe, and accessible treatments for both obesity and type 2 diabetes worldwide. While low-calorie diets can improve glucose levels and facilitate weight loss, this calorie restriction can increase hypoglycemia risk. These findings were published in Diabetic Medicine on February 23, 2018. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website. A few facts about me in case you are new to my column and site. My life in the diabetes c Continue reading >>

Strategies For Management Of Intermittent Fasting In Patients With Diabetes

Strategies For Management Of Intermittent Fasting In Patients With Diabetes

Islam is the second most common religion in the world, and there are 1.6 billion Muslims, many in areas where diabetes is prevalent. Each year observant Muslims fast during the daylight hours for the holy month of Ramadan. It is estimated that 50 million diabetic people fast between dawn and sundown during Ramadan, and Muslims are not the only group of patients who fast for religious or other reasons. It is important for healthcare providers to guide patients with diabetes in avoiding problems related to prolonged fasting. In this issue of the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine, Drs. A.V. and Zagar address management of diabetes specifically relating to Ramadan fasting, with considerations that also apply to other diabetic patients who fast for religious or for medical reasons. Fortunately, we now have antihyperglycemic agents that are unlikely to cause hypoglycemia if used alone or in combination, as long as the regimen does not include insulin or a sulfonylurea. These include: Metformin and thiazolidinediones (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), which improve insulin sensitivity Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, dulaglutide, and albaglutide), which facilitate insulin release in a glucose-dependent fashion Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (sitagliptin, saxagliptin, alogliptin, and linagliptin), which augment endogenous incretin hormones, primarily GLP-1, and also facilitate insulin production in a glucose-dependent fashion Alpha glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose and miglitol), which slow carbohydrate absorption. Introduced in recent years, the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin lower blood glucose by reducing the renal threshold for reabsorption of glucose, coupled with reabs Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting Could Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes, New Research Says

Intermittent Fasting Could Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes, New Research Says

Intermittent Fasting Could Raise Your Risk of Diabetes, New Research Says This diet might not be right for everyone Intermittent fasting might seem like a good way to control your eating and lose weight, but new research presented at the annual meeting of the European Society of Endocrinology suggests that it could come with an unexpected risk. Diets based on temporary periods of fasting, such as intermittent fasting, could alter the bodys natural release of insulin, increasing the risk of Type 2 diabetes. 10 Eating Habits That Are Raising Your Risk of Developing Diabetes Ana Bonassa and a team of researchers from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil investigated the effects of fasting diets on a group of rats, keeping close tabs on body weight, levels of damaging free radicals, and insulin function over three months. Fasting diets,often called intermittent fasting, involve temporary intervals of reduced eating followed by intervals of eating more regularly. These types of diets have become increasingly popular in recent years, even attracting interest from celebrities like Kourtney Kardashian .Some intermittent fasters dont eat after a certain hour, say7 p.m., and then delay breakfast the following morning until 10 or 11 a.m..Others fast one day a week, or follow popular diets such as the 16:8, which consists of a 16-hour fasting window followed by an 8-hour feasting window during which two to three healthy meals are consumed. The researchers noticed that the diets werent working . Although the rats were eating less and losing weight overall, the amount of fat tissue around their abdomens grew larger. Their pancreases, which are in charge of releasing insulin, also showed damage that pointed to growing insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the driving factor behi Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, The Quick Start Guide

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, The Quick Start Guide

How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I can write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, coming up) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is the quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A Fully Reversible Disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing this truth is the crucial first step in reversing your diabetes or pre-diabetes. Actually, it something that most people already instinctively recognized to be true. Suppose y Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes – Here’s The Science

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes – Here’s The Science

Intermittent fasting is currently all the rage. But don’t be fooled: it’s much more than just the latest fad. Recent studies of this kind of fasting – with restricted eating part of the time, but not all of the time – have produced a number of successes, but the latest involving diabetes might be the most impressive yet. The idea of intermittent fasting arose after scientists were wowed by the effects of constant calorie restriction. A number of studies in many different animals have shown that restricted eating throughout adulthood leads to dramatic improvements in lifespan and general health. The reasons for these improvements aren’t yet clear. Part of it seems to be that going without food gives cells in the body a much needed break to perform maintenance and repair. But the lack of food also forces cells to resort to alternative sources of energy. Some of these, such as ketones – molecules created in the liver from recycled fat – appear to be beneficial. ‘Fasting’ without fasting The problem is that constant calorie restriction isn’t practical: it’s easy for scientists to impose upon lab animals, but hard for humans to impose upon themselves in the real world. Fortunately, we’ve learned that constant calorie restriction isn’t really necessary. Intermittent fasting seems to have many of the same benefits. There are two main types of intermittent fasting. One type, known as “time restricted feeding”, requires eating only during a few hours of the day – say between 10am and 6pm. This approach gives the body a long break from food each night, and also reinforces beneficial circadian rhythms. The other type of intermittent fasting – made popular by the 5:2 diet – is known as “periodic fasting”. This approach involves alternating be Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Intermittent Fasting May Raise Risk

Type 2 Diabetes: Intermittent Fasting May Raise Risk

Type 2 diabetes: Intermittent fasting may raise risk New research suggests that intermittent fasting may raise insulin levels, damage pancreatic cells, and increase the amount of abdominal fat. Intermittent fasting may be a popular diet, but it may also harm our metabolic health, suggests a new study. The so-called intermittent fasting diet has been gaining more and more traction among people who want to lose weight quickly. This popular diet consists of "fast" days, where one drastically restricts their calorie intake to a quarter of the daily dose or less, for instance and "feast" days, where the person dieting can eat whatever they please. Sometimes referred to as a dieting " fad ," intermittent fasting has become popular in recent years, due to its suggested benefits of increasing lifespan and staving off cancer . Indeed, some animal studies have indicated that intermittent fasting may lower the risk of cancer, while observational studies have shown that people whose religion has them fasting regularly live longer than seniors who do not fast. But could there also be downsides to intermittent fasting? Research presented at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting which took place in Barcelona, Spain suggests that the dieting practice may have serious consequences for a person's metabolism. Specifically, the new study led by Ana Cludia Munhoz Bonassa, a researcher at the University of So Paulo in Brazil suggests that intermittent fasting may impair the normal activity of the pancreas and the production of insulin , which may, in turn, raise the risk of type 2 diabetes . Intermittent fasting may lead to diabetes The researchers were prompted in their endeavor by older studies suggesting that fasting for a short period of time increases oxidative stress an Continue reading >>

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

When the now 46-year-old Mary Roberts from Lockhart, Texas, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2008, her doctor immediately put her on Metformin (glucophage), a drug to help stabilize blood sugar. “When I got the diagnosis, I guess I wasn’t surprised,” says Roberts, explaining that not only was she overweight but her mom had been on insulin for type 2 diabetes. Not wanting to be on medication herself for her entire life, Roberts set out on a path to control the diabetes through diet, but a few years of nutrition classes proved unsuccessful in lowering her blood sugar level. It was after her doctor suggested insulin on top of the high dose of Metformin that Roberts switched gears. “I really wanted to find a way to get healthy,” she says. She found the solution in changing her approach to eating — just not the way she expected. Intermittent fasting (IF) combined with the popular ketogenic diet, which emphasizes dramatically reducing carbohydrate intake, helped her lose weight and lower her A1C. “I feel amazing,” Roberts says. What Is Intermittent Fasting and How Is It Done? Although IF has become more popular in recent years, the diet plan isn’t new. In fact, many religions (including Christianity, Judaism, and Islam) have followers who practice fasting of some variety throughout the year. Fasting is often required for blood tests, medical procedures, or surgery. The reason IF has gained so much attention recently is likely due to the release of new diet books plugging the plans and celebrity endorsements. “I think that it has gained popularity because anytime a person drastically cuts calories from their diet, they’re going to lose weight. And we’re so results driven that by seeing that happen we think, This is a great solution,” says Despina Continue reading >>

Pros And Cons Of Intermittent Fasting For Diabetes

Pros And Cons Of Intermittent Fasting For Diabetes

Pros and Cons of Intermittent Fasting for Diabetes Eileen Bailey / @eileenmbailey , Health Writer You may have heard of a trend in dieting called intermittent fasting and read that it may help control type 2 diabetes . But is it really safe for all diabetics? And what are the pros and cons? Learn more about the evidence behind intermittent fasting diets for managing type 2 diabetes. Intermittent fasting restricts caloric intake during certain times. One popular version is the 5:2 diet. This means you eat normally for five days (2,500 calories for men, 2,000 for women) and fast for two non-consecutive days, limiting your caloric intake to 500 calories in a 24-hour period on fasting days. Another version is the 16:8 diet, where you eat within an eight-hour window each day, for example, you might eat only between 10 AM and 6 PM or you might eat from 12 Noon to 8 PM. You choose the time frame that works best for your schedule. You dont take in any calories during the remaining 16 hours of the day.The theory is that your body will burn more fat during fasting and help you lose weight. As with any diet, the goal is to develop healthy eating habits so that not only do you lose weight during the diet but that you maintain a healthy weight after. There are both benefits and disadvantages to this type of diet. Intermittent fasting may improve body weight, fasting blood glucose and postprandial variability in people with diabetes type 2 according to a study completed in 2017 . It is a simple and accessible dietary intervention that is easy to implement and improves glycemic control according to a study completed in 2017 Intermittent fasting may be easier to stick with for some people. You dont have to constantly restrict calories, count calories or deny yourself foods you enjoy. Continue reading >>

Intermittent Dieting Has More Negatives Than Positives For Weight Loss.

Intermittent Dieting Has More Negatives Than Positives For Weight Loss.

The New Zealand researchers found the risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) was increased during the fasting days, as expected, but that the two intermittent fasting plans they tested still managed to produce weight loss and a drop in A1c levels, which is used to assess your risk for diabetes;1 the study is published in Diabetic Medicine. However, three endocrinology experts who reviewed and commented on the study for EndocrineWeb say other approaches are less hazardous and just as, or more effective in producing a healthy weight loss. Evaluating the Research on Intermittent Fasting Researchers from Wellington Hospital and the University of Otago in New Zealand defined intermittent fasting a bit differently than we do here in the US. Participants could eat whatever they wanted five days a week and then they were instructed to fast for the next two days.1 They had to do this for 12 weeks. In this study, the ''fast'' was actually a very low-calorie diet. Men could eat about 600 calories on a fast day and women were limited to 500 calories. At the start, 41 participants who had been living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) for years were randomly assigned to this 5:2 plan, as it is sometimes called. About half of them were instructed to fast for two days in a row during the week; the others were instructed to fast on non-consecutive days. In the consecutive fasting group, the average age was 62 years and their diabetes diagnosis had been made 13 years ago, on average. In the non-consecutive group, the average age was 58 years, and their diagnosis had been made 9 years earlier.1 The men and women were on a variety of medications, including insulin, sulfonylureas, metformin, and oral hypoglycemic agents.1 The researchers made adjustments to their medications in response to lower Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

I’m sure that at least a few of you have heard or read about the latest trend in weight loss called “intermittent fasting.” The very word “fasting” is probably less than appealing, as it pretty much means you don’t eat or drink anything (except perhaps water) for a specified amount of time. Starvation is not exactly recommended among health professionals. But intermittent fasting is different. Is it something you should try? What is intermittent fasting, anyway? Intermittent fasting has been the talk of the town, so to speak, thanks to two recent books to hit the market: The Fast Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley and Mimi Spencer, and The Overnight Diet by Caroline Apovian, MD. Intermittent fasting essentially means that you skip a meal or severely restrict calories on certain days of the week with the intention of losing weight, controlling blood glucose, and/or decreasing heart disease risk. But on the other days of the week, you can pretty much eat what you want (within reason, of course). For many people, this concept sounds appealing. Limiting calories for a couple days a week doesn’t sound that bad if you can eat what you want the rest of the time. The Fast Diet, also called the The 5:2 Diet has you eat between 500 and 600 calories (women get 500 calories, men get 600 calories) for two days out of the week, spread over two meals of about 250 to 300 calories. These fast days should not be right in a row, and your food choices ideally should be more plant-based and emphasize protein. The premise is that after several hours of fasting, the body burns up its carbohydrate stores and shifts to burning fat for fuel. Many claim that intermittent fasting also helps to blunt appetite. The Overnight Diet emphasizes getting enough sleep; a lack of sleep can disrupt met Continue reading >>

How Intermittent Fasting Can Help Reverse Diabetes

How Intermittent Fasting Can Help Reverse Diabetes

The “Fast Cure” for Diabetes Though we may not like to admit it, type 2 diabetes is a disease chiefly brought on by our lifestyle choices.[1] Yes, genetics come into play too, but when it comes to type 2 diabetes, you are not a slave to your gene pool. You have the power to even alter your genes.[2] According to the American Diabetes Association, type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide at an alarming rate due to obesity and a sedentary lifestyle.[3] So, let’s say that you (or someone you know) became overweight, were less and less active, and finally one day at a routine doctor visit, your doctor announced that you have type 2 diabetes and put you on medication to lower your blood sugar. Perhaps you’ve been taking diabetes meds for years now and the idea of reversing your diabetes seems far-fetched, even fanciful. Maybe your doctor doesn’t believe that type 2 diabetes is reversible. That has been the traditional medical thought greatly influenced by the pharmaceutical companies who want to push their expensive drugs. But a new day has dawned and many doctors are seeing their patients reverse their type 2 diabetes. One effective way people reverse their type 2 diabetes is by intermittent fasting. Dr. Jason Fung, MD, writes, “While many consider type 2 diabetes (T2D) irreversible, fasting has been long known to cure diabetes.”[4] Wow, “cure” is a strong word coupled with diabetes and spoken by a medical doctor! Harvard University is home to the famous Joslin Center for Diabetes. The center is named after Dr. Elliot Joslin, one of the greatest specialists in diabetes of all time. In 1916, Dr. Joslin wrote an article in the Canadian Medical Association Journal about fasting for the treatment of diabetes. Based on his experience, he was convinced that all i Continue reading >>

New Research Linking Intermittent Fasting To Increased Diabetes Risk Stirs Debate

New Research Linking Intermittent Fasting To Increased Diabetes Risk Stirs Debate

New research linking intermittent fasting to increased diabetes risk stirs debate How does new research suggesting intermittent fasting could increase a person's diabetes risk stack up with a growing body of science suggesting the exact opposite?(Credit: opolja/Depositphotos ) New research presented recently at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting is suggesting the intermittent fasting diets may actually damage the pancreas and increase a person's risk for type 2 diabetes. The research stands in opposition to many studies in recent years that have pointed to the positive health effects of intermittent fasting and experts suggest this new data should be treated with caution. The new study, from a team at the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil, set out to investigate the effect of fasting on body weight, free radical levels and insulin function. For three months, healthy adult rats were subjected to intermittent fasting consisting of no food every other day. Although a decrease in overall body weight was recorded across the experiment period, an increase in abdominal fat tissue was identified. Most striking is the study's finding that after three months of this diet, insulin-producing cells in the pancreas displayed damage. Markers of insulin resistance were identified, as were increased levels of free radicals. "This is the first study to show that, despite weight loss, intermittent fasting diets may actually damage the pancreas and affect insulin function in normal healthy individuals, which could lead to diabetes and serious health issues," says Ana Bonassa, one of the researchers on the project. The research was presented as part of a conference presentation, is currently unpublished and is not peer-reviewed, so caution is necessary when evaluating its Continue reading >>

The Diabetics Guide To Intermittent Fasting

The Diabetics Guide To Intermittent Fasting

Is IF safe for people with diabetes? Will IF get results for people with diabetes? IF is becoming very popular. There are a wide range of different fasting methods, some of the most popular include: Eat Stop Eat 5:2 Diet (participants limit their calorie intake on two days per week) 16:8 diet 18:6 diet Generally speaking, IF works well for people who are looking to lose body fat, fast-paced individuals who struggle to get the time to eat multiple meals per day and people with diabetes wanting to improve their HBA1C In respect to diabetes management, The typical Intermittent 18 hour fast followed by a 6 hour eating window can help improve HBA1C levels. If you stop eating at 6:00 pm your quick acting insulin is pretty much out of your system by 10:00pm (bedtime). Provided your blood glucose is within target range and your background insulin is dosed correctly, your next 18 hours (until 12:00pm the next day) will sit well inside range. Solid diabetes control means a good HBA1C and less likelihood of complications. Other intermittent fasting methods like the 16 hour (fast)/8 hour (eat) window also work well. If you have a bit of dawn phenomenon you may need a unit or two of quick acting insulin to prevent high blood glucose. How much insulin you need to take is largely based on your calorie needs for your specific goal, stress, level of activity and some trial and error. In respect to fat loss, The latest consensus statement from the ISSN on body comp and diets (which we have reviewed extensively inside the Training Lab) concludes IF has no significant benefits on body composition over other methods that drive a daily calorie deficit. The basic concept of Intermittent fasting is grounded on the limited feeding window of 6 to 8 hours. This narrow eating window makes it harde Continue reading >>

How Fasting Reverses Type 2 Diabetes

How Fasting Reverses Type 2 Diabetes

While many consider type 2 diabetes (T2D) irreversible, fasting has been long known to cure diabetes. In our previous post, we considered bariatric surgery. While extreme, these surgeries have proven the point that the metabolic abnormalities that underlie T2D (hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance) can be fully reversible even after a few short weeks. Many early studies were done with the heavy-duty Roux-en-Y surgery, which is the heavyweight champions of surgeries. The best weight loss. The most complications. This is the surgery that has ‘Go Big or Go Home’ tattooed on its massive bicep. But even milder forms of bariatric surgery show the same reversibility of T2D. A gastric band is essentially a belt implanted around your stomach. The surgeon keeps tightening the belt so that you can’t eat. If you try to eat too much, you’ll puke it all back up. Lovely. It ain’t pretty, but it sure does work. Again, long term results are kind of iffy, but short term results are pretty good. The results of gastric banding versus medical treatment showed a significant and pretty damn good drop in their fasting blood sugars. In other words, their T2D was reversing in a b-i-g way. Those given medicines alone basically stayed the same. They were no better than before. Gastric banding a 500 pound patient will still reverse 20 years of diabesity within weeks. One of the main questions is why? There are many hypotheses, but essentially, it is the sudden severe restriction of all calories that causes this beneficial effect. This is the same thing as the time tested, ancient healing tradition of fasting. Fasting is the voluntary restriction of food for religious, health or other purposes (eg. hunger strikes). Is bariatrics simply a surgically enforced fast? The short answer is yes. I Continue reading >>

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