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Ten Surprising Facts About Diabetes

Ten Surprising Facts About Diabetes

Today is World Diabetes Day – blue monuments around the world put this often undetected disease into the spotlight.The World Health Organization estimates that more than 347 million people suffer from diabetes – more than one eighth of the world population. Only twenty years ago, WHO estimates said 135 million. Both diabetes type 1 and type 2 are on the rise, although numbers of the latter rise more quickly, hand in hand with the global obesity crisis. In the US, diabetes is the 6th leading cause of death, and its mortality rate equals that of the global HIV/Aids epidemic. More than twenty years ago, the International Diabetes Federation chose November 14th for its World Diabetes Day – Frederick Banting’s birthday, the first doctor who succeeded in treating a human patient with animal insulin in 1922. One year later, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. At the age of 32, he was the youngest Nobel laureate ever in this category. Ten Surprising Facts About Diabetes 1.Type 1 and 2 have completely different underlying molecular mechanisms: in type 1, an autoimmune reaction destroys the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. Consequently patients are dependent on insulin shots or pumps for life. The origin of this disease is unknown, but there is definitely a genetic component. On the other hand, type 2 is characterised by a growing insulin resistance: the body produces insulin, but its various cells become immune to it. At some point, the pancreas stops producing insulin. 2. More than 90 percent of all diabetes patients have type 2. They don’t necessarily have the typical symptoms like extreme thirst or frequent urination. According to estimates, one third of all afflicted people don’t even know they have diabetes. They only learn abo Continue reading >>

10 Essential Facts About Type 2 Diabetes

10 Essential Facts About Type 2 Diabetes

Your body breaks down the food you eat and uses it for growth and energy. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body may not be able to accomplish this routine function as efficiently. The good news is “there's a lot people can do to improve their lifestyle and live long, healthy lives,” says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, and director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Here are 10 essential facts you need to know about type 2 diabetes so that you can make the right decisions and stay healthy — for life: It's the most common type of diabetes. More than 23 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, and of those, 90 to 95 percent have type 2 diabetes, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). If you’re 45 or older, you should get tested, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). And people who are overweight and have another risk factor should be tested sooner. Risk factors include: Having a parent or sibling with diabetes Being of African-American, American-Indian, Asian, Hispanic, or of Pacific Islander descent Being sedentary Having high blood pressure Having abnormal cholesterol levels (low HDL or high triglycerides) Having a history of cardiovascular disease Having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) If you have diabetes, you should know your blood glucose numbers. One way to know if your treatment is working is to track your blood glucose levels. Target ranges are based on individual considerations. Your doctor will let you know where your numbers should be. Your diet doesn’t have to be restrictive. “A meal plan to better manage diabetes is simply a healthy eating pattern that all of us should be following,” Massey says. The ADA encourages a balanced diet that includes vegetables, Continue reading >>

Biology For Kids

Biology For Kids

Science >> Biology for Kids Disease: Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that causes a person to have high blood sugar. Over time, high blood sugar can damage organs such as the kidneys and heart. Nerve and blood vessel damage can lead to blindness and even the need for amputation of extremities such as the toes. High blood sugar is a result of the body not getting enough insulin or not responding to the insulin it is getting. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone produced by an organ called the pancreas. Insulin takes the sugar in our blood (also called glucose) and helps it get absorbed into our cells. Our cells then use the glucose for energy. Why is insulin important? When there isn't enough insulin in the blood two things happen. First, the glucose level in the blood increases. As the body continues to eat food, carbohydrates are turned into glucose and absorbed into the blood stream to be used for energy. If there is no insulin, the glucose can't be absorbed by the cells and used up. Second, the cells are starved of energy. They end up getting their energy from fat. Type I or Juvenile Diabetes Type I diabetes is caused when the body's own immune system decides to attack the pancreas and destroy the cells (called beta cells) that make insulin. Doctors aren't sure what causes the immune system to do this, but, once all the beta cells are destroyed, the pancreas will stop producing insulin. Type I diabetes is often referred to as juvenile diabetes. This is because most people are first diagnosed with the disease while they are still young. However, some people do get the disease later in life. Also, once a person has the disease they will have it for their entire life. There is no cure. Type II Type II diabetes is when the pancreas doesn't produce enough Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 2 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. About 90 to 95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Being overweight (BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There’s a genetic mutation involved in type 2 diabetes, although researchers haven’t been able to pinpoint the exact mutation. You must have a genetic mutation in order to develop type 2—not everyone can get it. If you have a family history, you are at higher risk. Many people are overweight when they’re diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. However, you don’t have to be overweight to develop it. Type 2 used to be called “adult-onset diabetes” because it was diagnosed mainly in older people. Today, though, more children around the world are being diagnosed with type 2, so type 2 is the more common name now. Most people with type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant, meaning that their bodies don’t use insulin properly. They make more than enough of it, but their cells are resistant to it and do not know how to use it properly. Some people with type 2 diabetes don’t produce enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes can usually be managed well with a combination of healthier meal plan choices, physical activity, and oral medications. Some people may have to take insulin in order to get better blood glucose control. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, the hormone that controls blood-sugar levels. T1D develops when the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells are mistakenly destroyed by the body’s immune system. The cause of this attack is still being researched, however scientists believe the cause may have genetic and environmental components. There is nothing anyone can do to prevent T1D. Presently, there is no known cure. Who T1D affects Type 1 diabetes (sometimes known as juvenile diabetes) affects children and adults, though people can be diagnosed at any age. With a typically quick onset, T1D must be managed with the use of insulin—either via injection or insulin pump. Soon, people who are insulin dependent may also be able to use artificial pancreas systems to automatically administer their insulin. How T1D is managed Type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 disease that requires constant management. People with T1D continuously and carefully balance insulin intake with eating, exercise and other activities. They also measure blood-sugar levels through finger pricks, ideally at least six times a day, or by wearing a continuous glucose monitor. Even with a strict regimen, people with T1D may still experience dangerously high or low blood-glucose levels that can, in extreme cases, be life threatening. Every person with T1D becomes actively involved in managing his or her disease. Insulin is not a cure While insulin therapy keeps people with T1D alive and can help keep blood-glucose levels within recommended range, it is not a cure, nor does it prevent the possibility of T1D’s serious effects. The outlook for treatments and a cure Although T1D is a serious and challenging disease, long-term management options cont Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes

Facts About Diabetes

You can be a diabetes expert with our diabetes facts. Don't forget to share them with your friends and family so they know about diabetes too! General diabetes facts The full medical name for diabetes is Diabetes Mellitus There are 3 main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes Type 1 diabetes is sometimes called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes Type 1 diabetes is managed using insulin injections or an insulin pump 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes used to be called non-insulin dependent diabetes Type 2 diabetes is managed by diet, exercise and sometimes medication and insulin Diabetes in the UK More than 3 million people in the UK are diagnosed with diabetes - of these about 270,000 have type 2 diabetes and around 300,000 have from type 1 diabetes Approximately 850,000 people in the UK have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes In the UK, most diabetes patients receive treatment on the National Health Service (NHS) Diabetes worldwide Diabetes affects around 370 million adults worldwide The global diabetes rate is expected to grow to 552 million by 2030, or 9.9% of the adult population Diabetes is rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries China has the largest diabetes population, with 90 million diabetes sufferers, followed by India (61.3m) and the USA (23.7m) Africa is projected to see the largest growth in diabetes prevalence between now and 2030, with rates forecast to rise from 14.7 million to 28 million (90% increase) Diabetes history World Diabetes Day is on November 14th every year Diabetes was given its name by the Greek Physician Aretaeus (30-90CE), but the history of the disease can be dated back to ancient Egypt! There is a lot to learn about diabetes, but don’t get put off! Random diabete Continue reading >>

18 Surprising Diabetes Facts You Must Know

18 Surprising Diabetes Facts You Must Know

More than 29 million Americans, or roughly 10%, of our total population have diabetes. Even though it’s a common disorder, interestingly, many of us are not aware of certain important facts about the history of the condition and how it affects the body. Let’s look at 18 interesting facts about diabetes. Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes And Insulin

Facts About Diabetes And Insulin

Diabetes is a very common disease, which, if not treated, can be very dangerous. There are two types of diabetes. They were once called juvenile-onset diabetes and adult diabetes. However, today we know that all ages can get both types so they are simply called type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1, which occurs in approximately 10 percent of all cases, is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system, by mistake, attacks its own insulin-producing cells so that insufficient amounts of insulin are produced - or no insulin at all. Type 1 affects predominantly young people and usually makes its debut before the age of 30, and most frequently between the ages of 10 and 14. Type 2, which makes up the remaining 90 percent of diabetes cases, commonly affects patients during the second half of their lives. The cells of the body no longer react to insulin as they should. This is called insulin resistance. In the early 1920s, Frederick Banting, John Macleod, George Best and Bertram Collip isolated the hormone insulin and purified it so that it could be administered to humans. This was a major breakthrough in the treatment of diabetes type 1. Insulin Insulin is a hormone. Hormones are chemical substances that regulate the cells of the body and are produced by special glands. The hormone insulin is a main regulator of the glucose (sugar) levels in the blood. Insulin is produced in the pancreas. To be more specific, it's produced by the beta cells in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. When we eat, glucose levels rise, and insulin is released into the bloodstream. The insulin acts like a key, opening up cells so they can take in the sugar and use it as an energy source. Sugar is one of the top energy sources for the body. The body gets it in many forms, but mainly as carbohydr Continue reading >>

Fast Facts - Data And Statistics About Diabetes

Fast Facts - Data And Statistics About Diabetes

Unless otherwise noted, all references in Fast Facts are from the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 (link is external). The Fact Sheet is the product of a joint collaboration of the CDC, NIDDK, the American Diabetes Association, and other government and nonprofit agencies. Sources of data for Fast Facts that do not come from the Statistics Report: Approximately 1.25 million American children and adults have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 prevalence figure calculated from prevalence data from the CDC’s SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study and from data in the National Diabetes Statistics Report showing that type 1 diabetes represents 5% of diagnosed diabetes. Costs of diabetes. American Diabetes Association: Economic Costs of Diabetes in the United States in 2012. Diabetes Care 36: 1033—1046, 2013. 85.2% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report MMWR 2003 The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. increased by 382% from 1988 to 2014 Calculated from NIHS data Diabetes kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast cancer combined Diabetes: Health, United States, 2010: 69,201 deaths Breast cancer 40,676 deaths, 2009 AIDS, 21,601 deaths, 2009 A person with diagnosed diabetes at age 50 dies 6 years earlier than a counterpart without diabetes Diabetes Mellitus, Fasting Glucose, and Risk of Cause-Specific Death Other Sources of Statistics State by State and County Level Diabetes Statistics State by state diagnosed prevalence and county level diabetes statistics can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's web site. Economic Cost of Diabetes in the US 2012 A summary and links to the study and supplementary data can be found on DiabetesPro at professional.diabetes.org/cost. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fast Facts

Diabetes Fast Facts

(CNN)Here's a look at diabetes, a disease that affects millions of people around the world. Diabetes is characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. The disease can lead to serious complications such as blindness, kidney damage, cardiovascular disease, limb amputations and premature death. Facts: Worldwide, the number of people living with the potentially fatal disease has quadrupled since 1980, to more than 400 million, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Prediabetes occurs when blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Before developing Type 2 diabetes, people almost always have prediabetes. Research has shown that some long-term damage to the body may occur during prediabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops when the body's immune system destroys pancreatic beta cells, the only cells in the body that make insulin. This form of diabetes usually strikes children and young adults. Only 5-10% of people with diabetes have Type 1. Risk factors for Type 1 diabetes may be autoimmune, genetic or environmental. There is no known way to prevent Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells do not use insulin properly. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and in adults, it accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. It is associated with older age, obesity, family history, physical inactivity and race/ethnicity. It is more common in African Americans, Latino Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, although still rare, is being diagnosed more frequently. Gestationa Continue reading >>

Interesting Facts About Type 1 Diabetes

Interesting Facts About Type 1 Diabetes

Facts about Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is also known as diabetes mellitus type 1, juvenile diabetes and insulin-dependent diabetes. The first case of type 1 diabetes was diagnosed long back in 1970s. Type 1 diabetes is characterised by deficient insulin production. This is because this condition causes pancreatic cells (resources of insulin) to start destroying body immunity. For survival, a person with type 1 diabetes requires daily administration of insulin. Exercise is also an important way of keeping control over diabetes. Diabetics are more vulnerable to other medical conditions. For instance, diabetes is the leading cause of amputation, kidney failure and blindness. High blood sugar level in type 1 diabetics can damage their blood vessels, thus affecting eyes, kidney and even heart. Until recently, juvenile diabetes (type 1 diabetes) was considered to be a disease affecting only kids. But of late even adults have been found likely to develop this condition. Diabetic children are largely diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Another interesting fact about diabetes type 1 is that till now its cause is not identified. However, factors such as autoimmunity and genetics are considered to be responsible for the disease. According to some studies, maximum number of type 1 diagnoses is from the colder northern climates. Researchers consider viral infections due to cold climate as a triggering factor for the disease. Eighty percent of diabetes deaths occur in low and middle income countries. However, type 1 is less common than type 2. About 90% of diabetes cases are of type 2 diabetes. Every year there are millions of death from diabetes. Even though, diabetes is not the direct cause of death, it contributes to the cause. For instance, kidney failure and heart diseases are Continue reading >>

8 Facts You Didn’t Know About Gestational Diabetes

8 Facts You Didn’t Know About Gestational Diabetes

Up to 20 percent of pregnancies involve gestational diabetes, a condition in which a woman who has never had diabetes before develops it, usually during the second trimester of pregnancy. Women who develop gestational diabetes stand a risk of the disease continuing after they give birth. Gestational diabetes can also be harmful to the unborn child, so managing it during pregnancy is crucial. Often gestational diabetes can be controlled with simple but consistent lifestyle changes. 1. Watch Glucose Levels The primary way to treat gestational diabetes involves following special meal plans designed to keep blood glucose levels within normal ranges for pregnant women. Often a pregnant woman with gestational diabetes is also required to test her blood glucose daily. She should aim for pre-meal glucose levels of 95 milligrams and postprandial levels of 120 milligrams or less. 2. Dietary and Exercise Changes A diet aimed at preventing gestational diabetes incorporates vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, fruit and unsaturated fats. In addition, pregnant woman are encouraged to reduce the amount of sugar they ingest. Getting at least two and a half hours of exercise each week also proves helpful in keeping gestational diabetes at bay. 3. Small Changes Make a Difference Studies show that these very small lifestyle changes in diet and exercise can reduce a woman’s risk of developing gestational diabetes by almost 40 percent. Women who make these simple changes also tend to gain fewer pounds during their pregnancies, further benefiting their overall health and lowering their diabetes risk. 4. Counseling Can Help Women who are at risk for developing gestational diabetes do better at preventing the condition if they receive even a few counseling sessions regarding diet and exerci Continue reading >>

12 Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

12 Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

Jupiterimages via Getty Images Diabetes is at epidemic proportions across the globe and most people know someone living with this condition. The serious physical and mental health complications associated with all types of diabetes however, are less widely known. Here are 12 things you might not know about diabetes. 1. The personal and social costs of diabetes are enormous If you live with diabetes you will know that it is not just about sugar. Most people associate diabetes with the sweet stuff, but it is far more complicated than that. Many people experience significant impact on their social and emotional wellbeing. 2. There are a number of types of diabetes, and while they have similar impacts on your body, they are very different diseases There are three basic types - type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (pregnancy diabetes). They have similar problems in relation to lack of insulin, but have different causes and management regimes. Type 2 diabetes never turns into type 1 diabetes, but many people with type 2 diabetes will eventually need some insulin injections to manage due to the progressive nature of the condition. 3. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and nothing to do with lifestyle or eating too much sugar In type 1 diabetes the pancreas does not make insulin at all because the cells that produce insulin have been destroyed by the body’s own immune system. While we are getting closer, we still don’t understand why this happens, but some kind of trigger sets of an autoimmune attack. It is usually diagnosed in people under 40, but can occur at any age. Insulin acts as a key to open the blood cells and release glucose from your food into your brain, muscles and organs, where it is needed to live. For people with type 1 diabetes in Continue reading >>

Alarming Facts About Diabetes In India

Alarming Facts About Diabetes In India

For those who call diabetes one disease need to know that it is really several different diseases. Most common types of diabetes are Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. A healthy diet and adequate exercise are important in tackling diabetes. Get latest news & live updates on the go on your pc with News App. Download The Times of India news app for your device. more » Latest Infographics Continue reading >>

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