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Diabetes Insults

Crossfit's Greg Glassman Diabetes Tweet Wrong (opinion) - Cnn

Crossfit's Greg Glassman Diabetes Tweet Wrong (opinion) - Cnn

CrossFit tweet dangerously wrong on diabetes Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Many diabetics have to check their blood sugar levels multiple times every day. CrossFit recently tweeted an "open diabetes" ad linking the disease to poor diet Stefany Shaheen: There are many causes and types of diabetes; Crossfit and its CEO should apologize Stefany Shaheen is the co-founder and chief operating officer of Good Measures , a Boston-based company providing registered dietitian services for the 21st century by combining clinical expertise with patented technology to help people better manage their health. Her new book, " Elle & Coach ," will be released August 25. The CEO of CrossFit , Greg Glassman, owes those living with diabetes an apology after his company tweeted a quote June 29 attributed to him -- "Make sure you pour some out for your dead homies" -- along with a photo of Coca-Cola's trademark bottle ad and the caption "open diabetes." Glassman's suggestion that people living with diabetes bring the disease upon themselves by consuming too much sugar or drinking too much soda is simply irresponsible. One high-profile person who lives with the disease, singer and Type 1 diabetes advocate Nick Jonas, agreed and called Glassman out in tweets of his own. In a statement to ABC News, Glassman fired back at Jonas , insisting that CrossFit's initial controversial tweet was only in reference to Type 2 diabetes (the rest of his comments, according to an article on the ABC News website, were "so aggressive, it was not suitable to print"). But Glassman's initial tweet and lack of regret suggest a lack of complete understanding and pose many problems. For starters, there are many forms of diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is a classi Continue reading >>

8 Knock Knock Jokes About Type 1 Diabetes

8 Knock Knock Jokes About Type 1 Diabetes

The Insulin Nation staff came up with these. They might be funny. We know they’re corny. April Fools’ Day is upon us once again. In celebration, the Insulin Nation staff has come up with a few corny knock knock jokes with a Type 1 diabetes theme. Do you have any to add to this list? 1. Knock knock Who’s there? The Bee Gees. The Bee Gees who? The BG’s a little high. Did you bolus? 2. Knock knock Who’s there? High. High who? Knock knock Who’s there? Low. Low who? Knock knock Who’s there? A malfunctioning meter. Please test again. 3. Knock knock Who’s there? A cure for diabetes. A cure for diabetes who? I’ll come back in 5 to 10 years. 4. Knock knock Who’s there? Your pancreas. Your pancreas who? Knock Knock Who’s there? Your pancreas. Your pancreas who? Knock Knock Who’s there? Your panc – WHY WON’T YOU WORK? 5. Knock knock Who’s there? Endo. Endo who? And no, the doctor doesn’t have an open appointment this month. How about next month? 6. Knock knock Who’s there? Wilford Brimley. Wilford Brim- Diabeetus. 7. Knock knock. Who’s there? Tess. Tess who? Test strips all over your front step. Does someone with diabetes live here? 8. Knock knock Who’s there? Type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes who? Knock knock Who’s there? Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes who? Can’t you tell the difference? Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here. Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type2Nation. Continue reading >>

Relapsing And Remitting Insulin Requiring Diabetes: Type 1 Or Type 2?

Relapsing And Remitting Insulin Requiring Diabetes: Type 1 Or Type 2?

Relapsing and remitting insulin requiring diabetes: type 1 or type 2? 1 Specialist Registrar, Department of Diabetes and Metabolism, The Royal London Hospital, London, UK 2 Specialist Practice Nurse, Department of Diabetes and Metabolism, The Royal London Hospital, London, UK 3 Consultant in Diabetes, Department of Diabetes and Metabolism, The Royal London Hospital, London, UK Correspondence to: Dr TA Chowdhury E-mail: [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2006, The Royal Society of Medicine We present a case of ketosis prone type 2 diabetesan unusual presentation of diabetes seen predominantly in African-Caribbean patients. A 28-year-old previously healthy Barbadian man presented in May 1998 with acute polyuria, polydipsia and weight loss of approximately 4 kg. He was dehydrated, and his random plasma glucose was 21 mmol/L, with ++ketonuria and arterial pH 7.24 (normal range 7.35-7.45). He was treated for diabetic ketoacidosis, with intravenous fluids and insulin and, subsequently, subcutaneous twice daily mixtard 30 insulin, 15 units twice daily. Anti-islet cell antibodies were negative. He remained on this dose for about 4 months after diagnosis, but was subsequently troubled by frequent hypoglycaemia. Thereafter, he took insulin intermittently for a year. Despite prolonged periods without any insulin, he did not develop ketoacidosis. He failed to attend follow up in the diabetes clinic; but by early 2000 he was taking no insulin. In January 2003, he underwent an oral glucose tolerance test for an employment medical, which showed fasting glucose 5.5 mmol/L, and 2-hour glucose 3.7 mmol/L. He remained well until he was referred to the diabetic clinic by his practice nurse in June 2004. He p Continue reading >>

Induction Of Diabetes By Cumulative Environmental Insults From Viruses And Chemicals

Induction Of Diabetes By Cumulative Environmental Insults From Viruses And Chemicals

Induction of diabetes by cumulative environmental insults from viruses and chemicals Nature volume 288, pages 383385 (27 November 1980) | Download Citation Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC) induces diabetes in certain inbred strains of mice by infecting and destroying pancreatic cells1,2, the severity of the diabetes depending on the number of cells destroyed3. In strains of mice resistant to EMC-induced diabetes, insufficient cells are damaged to alter glucose homeostasis3,4. However, diabetes can be produced in many species by streptozotocin, a highly specific -cell toxin5. Here, we used concentrations of streptozotocin that did not produce diabetes, but reduced the -cell reserve. When strains of mice normally resistant to EMC-induced diabetes were first treated with sub-diabetogenic doses of streptozotocin, then infected with EMC virus, diabetes developed. Furthermore, when mice were infected with viruses such as Coxsackie B3 and B5, which ordinarily produce little if any -cell damage6, diabetes developed if the mice were first treated with sub-diabetogenic doses of streptozotocin. These findings suggest that diabetes may result from cumulative -cell damage induced by sequential environmental insults. Junod, A., Lambert, A. E., Stauffacher, W. & Renold, A. E. J. clin. Invest. 48, 21292139 (1969). Continue reading >>

Dermatoglyphic Meta-analysis Indicates Early Epigenetic Outcomes & Possible Implications On Genomic Zygosity In Type-2 Diabetes - F1000research

Dermatoglyphic Meta-analysis Indicates Early Epigenetic Outcomes & Possible Implications On Genomic Zygosity In Type-2 Diabetes - F1000research

Authorship, year of publication, country of origin of the sampled population, and sample sizes of the diabetic & healthy groups within the sampled population. The pooled effect sizes for all three fingerprint pattern datasets showed that significant heterogeneity was prominent ( Figure 2 Figure 4 ). The OR datasets ranged from 0.24 to 2.27, 0.34 to 3.35, and 0.55 to 5.99 for the loops, whorls, and arches respectively. The pooled OR of the loops resulted in a significant effect size (OR = 0.76, 95% C.I. = 0.590.98, z = 2.15, p = 0.03), with decreased occurrence of loops among diabetic patients. In contrast, the pooled estimates for the whorls & arches resulted in non-significant effect sizes, with an OR of 1.30 (95% C.I. = 0.981.72, z = 1.83, p = 0.07) for whorls, and an OR of 1.19 (95% C.I. = 0.981.72, z = 1.12, p = 0.26) for the arches, indicating higher prevalence of both patterns among diabetic patients. Figure 2. Forest plot of the association between loop fingerprint patterns & T2DM. Figure 3. Forest plot of the association between whorl fingerprint patterns & T2DM. Figure 4. Forest plot of the association between arch fingerprint patterns & T2DM. As is evident from the forest plot of TFRC effect sizes ( Figure 5 ), the pooled effect sizes for the TFRC dataset were significantly heterogeneous (I2 = 85%, p<.001). The pooled estimate resulted in an insignificant effect size (g = -0.03, 95% C.I. = 0.290.22, p = 0.79), with slightly lower TFRC among diabetic patients. Figure 5. Forest plot of the association between total finger ridge count (TFRC) & T2DM. The forest plot of AFRC effect sizes ( Figure 6 ) reveals no heterogeneity within the dataset, with the pooled estimate yielding a significant effect size (g = 0.19, 95% C.I. = -0.33-0.04, z = 2.58, p = 0.010), with Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

VASCULAR PROPHYLAXIS Diabetic patients have a twofold to threefold increase in the rate of cerebrovascular accidents or myocardial infarctions, and have a worse outcome than nondiabetic people from either myocardial infarction or stroke.227 Aspirin should be used as secondary prophylaxis in all diabetic people with evidence of macrovascular disease, and it should be strongly considered as primary prevention in diabetic subjects with other risk factors for macrovascular disease, such as hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, and albuminuria (macro or micro).228 Because of the platelet defects associated with diabetes, it is recommended that the dose of aspirin should be 300 mg per day,228–230 although the American Diabetes Association’s position statement (advocates a dose of 81 to 325 mg enteric-coated aspirin per day. If the patient cannot tolerate aspirin, then clopidogrel231 can be used. The elderly diabetic person is at increased risk of atrial fibrillation (odds ratio: 1.4 for men and 1.6 for women)232 and at twofold increased risk of thromboembolism from atrial fibrillation.233,234 We can find no subgroup analysis of the major atrial fibrillation trials to examine the benefits of warfarin specifically in older diabetic subjects. It appears that the adverse event rate in diabetic people drops from 8.6 events per 100 patients per year to 2.8 events with warfarin use.234 It is important to check for retinal new vessels when diabetic subjects are placed on warfarin, although the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study235 showed no excess vitreous or preretinal hemorrhages in subjects given aspirin for vascular prophylaxis. Despite our efforts, patients are still likely to suffer myocardial infarction. The Diabetes mellitus, Insulin Glucose infu Continue reading >>

10 Things Not To Say To A Person With Diabetes

10 Things Not To Say To A Person With Diabetes

Every person with diabetes has one: a story of a diabetes-related comment they received that completely left them reeling. There are memes and videos dedicated to these comments. The wise folks at Behavioral Diabetes Institute even made pocket-sized etiquette cards you can hand out to try to save people from their own big mouths. And you’d think it would all be enough to maybe keep people from making hurtful, embarrassing, and woefully misinformed comments to people with diabetes – but from my own life experience, it’s not. So here it is: 10 Things Not to Ask of or Say To, About, or Around a Person with Diabetes. 10. “Gross.” Listen, I know. No one hates the invasive nature of diabetes more than people with diabetes themselves. The poking, the bleeding, the alcohol-swabbing, the insertion of metal objects into subcutaneous tissue. But we do it to survive, and when you call us out for disturbing your delicate sensibilities when we’re just trying to juice up for a slice at the local pizzeria, it’s not helping anyone. Maybe just look away, or go get another beer. Cheers! 9. “Are you well controlled?” I used to think it was just weird primary care physicians who asked this question, but a fellow person with diabetes actually posed this query to me at a barbeque a few weeks ago. First of all, “well controlled” is different for everyone. Second of all, none of your beeswax. And third of all, if I say “no,” what kind of question are you going to ask me next? Let’s talk about the weather, shall we? 8. “Aren’t you worried about having kids?” Yes! The price of higher education is insane! Bullying in schools! Sleepless nights and breastfeeding drama! Climate change and – oh, you’re talking about diabetes? Well, yeah. Probably every person with Continue reading >>

6 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Diabetes

6 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Diabetes

After living with type 1 diabetes for nearly 17 years there are still comments that take me by surprise, and not usually in a good way. People chuckle when I tell them the title of the book I wrote, "If I Kiss You, Will I Get Diabetes?"...but I chose that title because my senior prom date asked me that before he went in there for the kiss! There are so many misconceptions about people living with diabetes and in my work as a spokesperson for various diabetes-related groups, I try hard to dispell them. Here are some insulting comments I've received over the years. Don't be this person. 6 Things You Should Never Say to Someone with Diabetes: 1. "It's your fault you got diabetes."This can be said in several different ways…."you ate too much when you were younger", or "your parents fed you too much candy when you were a kid", or when people say, "if you had just eaten better and/or exercised more you wouldn't have diabetes." First off, if you were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, we could’ve eaten spinach leaves for breakfast, lunch and dinner and still had the same fate…it’s an auto-immune disease. If you have type 2 diabetes, although lifestyle factors do play a factor in diagnosis, there are also several other factors that play into getting diagnosed….family history, race and older age. Let's be honest….I would say most people don't respond well to being shamed. 2. "I could never have diabetes because I could never give myself a shot." This is simply not helpful. Do you think I enjoy being a pincushion? For my younger brother Will and I, we had no choice in getting diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at a very young age. You’re forced into a new discipline and you have no choice if you want to take shots or not. Insulin is our life support. Trust me, if we didn't Continue reading >>

Urban Dictionary: Ur Species Diabetes

Urban Dictionary: Ur Species Diabetes

All other Ur insults including ur family tree LGBT are infinitely inferior to this. This is the threshold of insults and saying it will cause chaos so extreme that words cannot explain it. Warning: DO NOT USE THIS UNLESS YOU WANT TO FUCK UP THE WHOLE UNIVERSE James: Ur dad lesbian (Rob gets pulled into the afterlife with James) Rob: Ur granny tranny (James explodes and dies even though hes already dead) James: Ur sister mister (Entire 3rd dimension ceases to exist) Rob: Ur pappy trappy (Time stops existing and the big bang repeats for an infinite number of times) James: Ur family tree LGBT (All parallel universes going up to the eleventh dimension become super massive black holes, the dimension barrier breaks, and all the black holes simultaneously swallow each other simultaneously as time already ceases to exist) Rob: Ur species diabetes (Time becomes a black hole that loops back to itself transferring all the information of the exploding universe into itself causing the infinite multiplication of time. Nothing ever existed so therefore the argument never existed. This results in a paradox of the universe creating infinite to the infinite power of parallel universes that have infinite dimensions all colliding and exploding at the same time creating an endless number of more universes.) Continue reading >>

Protective Effects Of Bogijetong Decoction And Its Selected Formula On Neuropathic Insults In Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Animals

Protective Effects Of Bogijetong Decoction And Its Selected Formula On Neuropathic Insults In Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Animals

Protective Effects of Bogijetong Decoction and Its Selected Formula on Neuropathic Insults in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Animals Correspondence should be addressed to Chung Sik Cho ; [email protected] Received 27 April 2017; Accepted 27 June 2017; Published 16 August 2017 Copyright 2017 Ki-Joong Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Bogijetong decoction (BGJTD) is a mixture of herbal formulation which is used in the traditional Korean medicine for the treatment of neuropathic pain caused by diabetes. Here, we investigated the regulatory effects of BGJTD and its reconstituted decoction subgroups on the neuropathic responses in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic animals. Be decoction (BeD) was formulated by selecting individual herbal components that induced neurite outgrowth most efficiently in each subgroup. BeD induced the neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons most efficiently among decoction subgroups and downregulated the production of TNF- from the sciatic nerves in STZ-diabetic animals. While the levels of phospho-Erk1/2 were elevated in the sciatic nerves of STZ-diabetic animals by BGJTD and BeD treatments, p38 level was downregulated by BGJTD and BeD. A single herbal component of BeD induced neurite outgrowth comparable to BeD and was involved in the regulation of Erk1/2 activation and TNF- production in DRG neurons. Oral administration of BGJTD and BeD in STZ-diabetic animals reduced the latency time responding to thermal stimulation. Our results suggest that the reconstituted formulation is as effective as conventional BGJTD in inducing biochemical and behavioral recoverie Continue reading >>

Top 29 Most Annoying Things To Say To People With Diabetes

Top 29 Most Annoying Things To Say To People With Diabetes

Before I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I didn’t know anything about the disease. I might have also said something thoughtless out of pure ignorance. That’s what I try to remind myself when a non-diabetic (or maybe even a diabetic) says something to me about diabetes that is rude, annoying, or even offensive. These comments often stem from a simple lack of knowledge, being misinformed by general media, sometimes thoughtlessness and lack of consideration, and sometimes even fear. While I try to remind myself to be patient with a person’s lack of knowledge around diabetes, and that I believe it’s important that I try to kindly educate and teach those people (so they don’t repeat the same comments to someone else), those comments can still get old, hurt your feelings, make you laugh, and frustrate you to no end. This list is about knowing you’re not alone, and you’re not the only one who has been on the receiving end of these comments. The top 29 most annoying things to say to people with any type of diabetes: My grandma had diabetes. She lost her leg, then she died. (Thank you, that’s inspiring!) You’ll die if you eat sugar, right? You have diabetes? You don’t look that fat. (Gee, thanks….) You take insulin? Oh, you must have the bad kind of diabetes. (Really? What’s the good kind?) Your child has diabetes? Did they get it because you fed them too much candy? Oh my god, you have to take shots every day? I’d die if I had to do that. (Well, I’d die if I didn’t.) Doesn’t that hurt? (Um, yeah, it’s a sharp object going into my body. Duh!) Well, that sounds better than something like leukemia. Oh my god, can you eat that? You can’t eat that! That’s the disease that causes you to lose your legs, right? I heard you can cure that with di Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Finally Explained

Type 1 Diabetes Finally Explained

Let me say this with no exaggeration. My whole life, all day, all night, every day and each night is about keeping my blood sugar between the red and yellow lines. Whether I’m wearing, or not wearing, my continuous glucose monitor (CGM), screen pictured below. (The little white dots between the red and yellow lines are my blood sugar levels every five minutes. The 99 mg/dl (5.4 mmol/l) was my blood sugar level the moment I took this photo. The larger white dots are glare from the camera.) I just explained this “staying between the lines” to my mother, now being able to visibly show her on my monitor what I’ve long tried to tell her: Type 1 diabetes is a tightrope walk — all day and all night taking action to anticipate, prevent and recover from my blood sugar going too high and too low. My life is, and will forever be, staying between the lines. I got diabetes in February 1972 when I was 18 years old. I’m now 60. I’ve had diabetes more than four decades, more than two-thirds of my life. I have no memory of what life was like before “staying between the lines.” Type 1 diabetes is the other diabetes. The one you don’t hear about on TV commercials — that’s Type 2 diabetes. People with Type 2 diabetes produce insulin but not enough or their body doesn’t use it effectively. While people with Type 2 diabetes also must keep their blood sugar between the lines, it doesn’t require as intense effort. Even for those who take insulin, certain hormones they have that Type 1s lack, help to regulate their after meal blood sugars from rising too high and offset severe low blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. Your body destroys your pancreas’ insulin-producing (beta) cells. You no longer produce insulin, or at most a trace amount. It’s Continue reading >>

Www.realitycheck.org.au

Www.realitycheck.org.au

This is a secure and safe place for people to bitch, moan, argue, or rejoice (yes, really) about having Type 1 Diabetes. If something has inspired you or enraged you, here's your opportunity to let everyone know. I was talkin to a friend the other day and she reminded me about this guy at school who thought he was really witty... but really wasn't. In year 9 (about 7 years ago now) I was arguing with this guy, who, for privacy's sake, we shall name "Dipshit". Dipshit kept trying to make me mad, and was finally starting to succeed, until he came out with what he thought was a really harsh comment... "well, why don'y you... Go eat a jelly bean!" Gee that hurt... NOT... I was laughing so hard I had to leave the room to get a drink... and Dipshit still thinks I left the room in tears... The best was when he kept playing with my softclix one day. I asked him to put it down repeatedly, he kept ignoring me, then suddenly i hear a "click" and a "F*CK!!! that hurt!!"... yep, Dipshit pricked his pinkie... Aaah, couldn't happen to a nicer bloke... Anyone been "insulted" with comments like my jellybean one? Angie, that's awful! Your principal should've been shot... or castrated... or any number of things which would be horrible painful... When we moved to Melbourne I was in grade 5, and my new principal made me go to EVERY SINGLE CLASSROOM with a poster about diabetes ( I even had to take a syringe wit me) and give a talk on what diabetes is and what to do if you saw me unconcious... Sure, a bunch of prep kids are gonna give me an insulin shot, or remember to prick my finger first... I have a horrible story that I still feel really bad about. I was a typical 15yo teenage girl with 2 very close best girlfriends, and of course we would fight and switch between who was best friends & Continue reading >>

Induction Of Diabetes By Cumulative Environmental Insults From Viruses And Chemicals.

Induction Of Diabetes By Cumulative Environmental Insults From Viruses And Chemicals.

Induction of diabetes by cumulative environmental insults from viruses and chemicals. Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC) induces diabetes in certain inbred strains of mice by infecting and destroying pancreatic beta cells, the severity of the diabetes depending on the number of beta cells destroyed. In strains of mice resistant to EMC-induced diabetes, insufficient beta cells are damaged to alter glucose homeostasis. However, diabetes can be produced in many species by streptozotocin, a highly specific beta-cell toxin. Here, we used concentrations of streptozotocin that did not produce diabetes, but reduced the beta-cell reserve. When strains of mice normally resistant to EMC-induced diabetes were first treated with sub-diabetogenic doses of streptozotocin, then infected with EMC virus, diabetes developed. Furthermore, when mice were infected with viruses such as Coxsackie B3 and B5, which ordinarily produce little if any beta-cell damage, diabetes developed if the mice were first treated with sub-diabetogenic doses of streptozotocin. These findings suggest that diabetes may result from cumulative beta-cell damage induced by sequential environmental insults. Continue reading >>

Funny Diabetes Quotes

Funny Diabetes Quotes

As the fastest growing consumer health information site — with 65 million monthly visitors — Healthline’s mission is to be your most trusted ally in your pursuit of health and well-being. You can depend on us to provide expert content along with genuine caring. Both of which will support, guide, and inspire you toward the best possible health outcomes for you and your family. Continue reading >>

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