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Diabetes Insulin Belt

Insulin Pump Belts - Share Your Stories - Tudiabetes Forum

Insulin Pump Belts - Share Your Stories - Tudiabetes Forum

Ive been a type 1 diabetic for 20 years and have used a pump for 15. I have never used any kind of belt and want to know what types other pump users prefer. Ive only relied on pockets in shorts and pants. Summers coming and I want to try a belt or thigh strap for dresses. What is the most comfortable? Any suggestions or tips would be appreciated. Ive used spibelts and now Im using those and another one from pumpcases on amazon. This one has a vertical pocket that opens with a Velcro closure which I like. Its easier to get at my pump. They do tend to move around more than my Spi belts The pumpcases one comes in different sizes so you can use it on your legs or arms too. I use mine in my waste and I clip my Dexcom on it too. Im going to get a soft flannel one soon for more comfort when sleeping. I have to wear mine under sleeping clothes so my kitten doesnt chew the tubing. Ive given up on dresses because I dont like the band around my waist with a dress. I leave my pump out in the open mostly so I can access it- sometimes its under my shirt or jacket a bit. I dont want to have to start going into my bra or lifting up my dress to bolus etc. pockets were not reliable. I use a Spibelt during the day, I like the secure catch & it doesnt tend to move much. But at night I use a Waist-It as there is no hard buckle to dig into you if you lie on it. I prefer to wear my pump in a belt & not in a pocket as it stays in place when I go to the toilet. I wear my Dexcom receiver in a Tally Gear pouch which I clip onto the Spi Belt, it has a transparent window so I can just reach down & look at it. At night the Dexcom receiver sits on my wooden night stand next to the bed, it vibrates well on the wood & wakes me up. I make my daughter pump belts out of cotton knit fabric. It is kinda li Continue reading >>

The Infinitybelt Answer For Diabetic Insulin Pumps

The Infinitybelt Answer For Diabetic Insulin Pumps

The InfinityBelt Answer for Diabetic Insulin Pumps diabetes , diabetic insulin pump , insulin pump One of the main goals of the InfinityBelt is to make everyone feel more confident in their clothing by eliminating belt buckle bulges. Thanks to our wonderful customers, we have discovered another way the InfinityBelt can eliminate bulges. The InfinityBelt can make a diabetic insulin pump more discreetas well. Insulin pumps deliver insulin 24 hours a day through a catheter placed under the skin. Using an insulin pump can give diabetics freedom from multiple daily injections but unfortunately, can be a bit cumbersome to have attached to you at all times. InfinityBelt customer Deborah explains: "If I wear a dress there is no way to wear my pump unless I put it in my bra and then it sticks out there. With the InfinityBelt I just put it around my waist and hang my insulin pump from it. I have looked for something to use with my insulin pump andthis was the answer." The InfinityBelt is a great way to keep your pump stable under formal wear, while working out and sleeping. The lightweight elastic band is stretchable so it gives you many different options for a comfortable placement of your insulin pump. Feel free to use the Contact Us form and let us know if you have questions about what fit is best for you. We are happy to help you in your sizing needs. Want to get yours now? Use code PUMP 10 to receive 10% off! Disclaimer: The information in this post is a general recommendation that others have found helpful. Please consult your doctor for medical advice. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Spibelt: Waist Belt W/ Insulin Pump Pouch. Free Us Shipping.

Diabetic Spibelt: Waist Belt W/ Insulin Pump Pouch. Free Us Shipping.

Ive had my spibelt for 2 years now, and use it to hold my insulin pump while sleeping. It is absolutely perfect. Im ordering another one for all of my outdoor activities. Seconding what another reviewer said: Ive had mine for nearly 20 months now, and since about month 2 I just run the tubing through the zipper. It zips up all the way and still leaves enough room for the tubing, no problem. I dont want to bother with disconnecting my set and threading it through the buttonhole-type opening. Also, maybe Im just using it wrong but I find my pump hangs down in the pocket, so the zipper is above it instead of across it like in all the pictures. As a result, it very much does bounce if I run. That said, it works well enough and Im considering buying a non-logo belt for dress code reasons. I have been wearing a Spibelt for several years and it has done me well. I also just tuck the tubing into the pocket and zip it closed and have no problem with the tubing working its way out . I suggested a zipper that one would be able to tuck the tab under when zipped shut as occasionally my spibelt will turn and the zipper can poke my skin. I use my for an insulin pump 24/7. I struggled for a while and finally gave up trying to fit my disconnected infusion set tubing through and had to just use the zipper making it no different from the normal belt :/ Save the money and just buy a normal one because you wont be able to use the special tubing hole anyway, at least i cant with Animas pump. Wear it 24/7 for years. Love the space built in so it doesnt pinch tubing. Elastic on belt stretching out of shape but is hidden anyway. No one with a pump is without a glucometer. How about a system that accommodates bothI lose way to many glucometers. I am very happy with the spibelt product. I buy it Continue reading >>

Insulin Replacement Therapy

Insulin Replacement Therapy

Insulin replacement therapy and type 1 and 2 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks the cells that make insulin. This results in no or very little insulin. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent diabetes. It usually happens at a younger age. It often starts before age 30. Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes getting daily multiple injections of insulin or using an insulin pump. Type 2 diabetes typically means the body cannot make enough insulin for the amount of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance means the body cannot use insulin the way it should. Treatment often begins with an exercise program and a healthy diet to help lower the blood sugar levels. But if this treatment plan doesn't work, you may need medicine. Medicines for diabetes may be pills or injections. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. It helps lower the blood sugar by moving sugar from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. Once inside the cells, blood sugar becomes the main source of energy for the body. What are the different types of insulin? There are 4 types of insulin. Each works in specific ways. Onset How quickly the insulin starts to work after it is injected Peak time The period of time when the insulin helps most to lower blood sugar levels Duration How long the insulin keeps working in the body Insulin may act differently when given to different people, so the times of onset, peak time, and duration may vary. The 4 types of insulin are: Insulin type Onset (approximate) Peak time (approximate) Duration (approximate) Rapid acting, Lispro, Aspart, Glulisine insulin 15 minutes 1 hour 2 to 4 hours Short acting, Regular (R) insulin 30 minutes 2 to 3 hours 3 to 6 hours Intermediate acting, NPH (N) or Len Continue reading >>

Comfy-pump Insulin Pump Belts Large

Comfy-pump Insulin Pump Belts Large

The Comfy-pump insulin pump belts are so comfortable and lightweight that you will forget that youre even wearing one. Made from a high quality Lycra/Nylon stretch-fabric, they fit snug around your waist so that you can discreetly carry your pump underneath your clothing in one of their inbuilt pockets. With each belt containing from three to six pockets depending on the size, you can also use your Comfy-pump belt to safely carry a hypo treatment, mobile phone or money. PLEASE NOTE: All the prices are EXCLUDING GST AND SHIPPING, this will be added at the checkout stage. DE-CP L BEIGE Comfy Pump Belt Large Beige DE-CP L BLACK Comfy Pump Belt Large Black Comfy Pump insulin pump belts are made from high quality Lycra/Nylon fabric that fits snug around your waist. Each belt has a number of pockets, which allow you to place the insulin pump wherever it suits you. In the extra pockets, you can carry food for hypo treatment, extra equipment, a mobile phone or even money. Similar products on the market are restrictive, uncomfortable and leave quite a visible bulge under your shirt. But Comfy Pump belts are so comfortable and subtle that youll forget its even there and others wont even notice! When ordering the Comfy Pump belt, please choose the belt size nearest to your waist measurement. By choosing your exact or a slightly smaller sized belt, the belt will fit snugly and prevent your insulin pump from moving and bouncing when worn. As an example, the small size fits an average sized 5 to 12 year-old. The number of pockets in each belt varies depending on the size (the XS belt has 3 pockets, while the XL has 6). Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Overview

Insulin Pump Overview

As people with diabetes know, keeping blood sugar levels in a safe range is extremely important. Good blood sugar control not only makes you feel well, but also helps prevent long-term diabetes complications, such as blindness, kidney failure and heart disease. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin, a hormone that helps the body use sugar (glucose), a key source of energy that comes from carbohydrates. If you have type 1 diabetes you must make up for the lack of insulin with insulin therapy. Meanwhile, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but their bodies don’t use insulin properly, or they don’t produce enough insulin. Diet, exercise and medication can often work to control glucose levels. However, in certain cases, these measures aren’t enough, and insulin therapy is needed to better control blood sugar levels. While insulin can be given by self-injection, people who take multiple daily injections of insulinmay also consider using an insulin pump. An insulin pump provides continuous delivery of short acting insulin all day long. The insulin pump substitutes the need for long acting insulin. A pump also replaces the need for multiple daily injections with a continuous insulin infusion, and also helps to improve your blood sugar levels. How Do Insulin Pumps Work? Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices that mimic the way the human pancreas works by delivering small doses of short acting insulin continuously (basal rate). The device also is used to deliver variable amounts of insulin when a meal is eaten (bolus). The basal insulin rates are usually set up in your pump with your doctor, and you can have one or multiple basal settings programmed in your pump, based on your needs. You program the amount of insulin for your mealtime bolus di Continue reading >>

Diabetic Spibelt: Waist Belt W/ Insulin Pump Pouch. Free Us Shipping.

Diabetic Spibelt: Waist Belt W/ Insulin Pump Pouch. Free Us Shipping.

Ive had my spibelt for 2 years now, and use it to hold my insulin pump while sleeping. It is absolutely perfect. Im ordering another one for all of my outdoor activities. Seconding what another reviewer said: Ive had mine for nearly 20 months now, and since about month 2 I just run the tubing through the zipper. It zips up all the way and still leaves enough room for the tubing, no problem. I dont want to bother with disconnecting my set and threading it through the buttonhole-type opening. Also, maybe Im just using it wrong but I find my pump hangs down in the pocket, so the zipper is above it instead of across it like in all the pictures. As a result, it very much does bounce if I run. That said, it works well enough and Im considering buying a non-logo belt for dress code reasons. I have been wearing a Spibelt for several years and it has done me well. I also just tuck the tubing into the pocket and zip it closed and have no problem with the tubing working its way out . I suggested a zipper that one would be able to tuck the tab under when zipped shut as occasionally my spibelt will turn and the zipper can poke my skin. I use my for an insulin pump 24/7. I struggled for a while and finally gave up trying to fit my disconnected infusion set tubing through and had to just use the zipper making it no different from the normal belt :/ Save the money and just buy a normal one because you wont be able to use the special tubing hole anyway, at least i cant with Animas pump. Wear it 24/7 for years. Love the space built in so it doesnt pinch tubing. Elastic on belt stretching out of shape but is hidden anyway. No one with a pump is without a glucometer. How about a system that accommodates bothI lose way to many glucometers. I am very happy with the spibelt product. I buy it Continue reading >>

In The 'diabetes Belt,' A Small Town Grapples With Growth Of The World's Largest Insulin Maker

In The 'diabetes Belt,' A Small Town Grapples With Growth Of The World's Largest Insulin Maker

In the 'diabetes belt,' a small town grapples with growth of the world's largest insulin maker In the 'diabetes belt,' a small town grapples with growth of the world's largest insulin maker Novo Nordisk is constructing a $1.8 billion plant in Clayton, NC, to make the active pharmaceutical ingredients for a range of diabetes medicines. The plant is being built across the street from a facility where the Danish company has assembled and packaged its product for 25 years. The small town of 20,000 sits on the edge of a U.S. Novo Nordisk is constructing a $1.8 billion plant in Clayton, NC, to make the active pharmaceutical ingredients for a range of diabetes medicines. The plant is being built across the street from a facility where the Danish company has assembled and packaged its product for 25 years. The small town of 20,000 sits on the edge of a U.S. region known as the "diabetes belt," where people are more likely to have type 2 diabetes, and residents have cautiously embraced the industry's growing presence following decades of decline in the region's textile and tobacco industries. Residents are enthusiastic about the insulin maker's presence, but they also acknowledge the difficulties that come with a small town catering to the drug business. Unprecedented investment, spurred by the rising price of insulin products, has led to unprecedented development. The arrival of thousands of construction workers, while beneficial to local restaurants and hotels, reportedly has been problematic for homeowners near the plant's construction site. Perhaps the smoothest transition has been building a workforce, thanks to the development of an educational pipeline over the past decade. Johnston County Community College now trains almost 300 people a year to work in biotech, teaching Continue reading >>

Baseball; Belt Pump Helps Pitcher With Diabetes

Baseball; Belt Pump Helps Pitcher With Diabetes

Sports |BASEBALL; Belt Pump Helps Pitcher With Diabetes BASEBALL; Belt Pump Helps Pitcher With Diabetes When Detroit Tigers pitcher Jason Johnson starts tonight against the Yankees, he will have to worry about a potent lineup and a game plan to beat the team with the best record in baseball -- not exactly a carefree night at the ballpark. But Johnson, a tall and slender right-hander, will no doubt have less on his mind than in past appearances at Yankee Stadium. A diabetic, he will no longer have to prick his finger several times a game to check his blood sugar or worry that a lack of insulin is causing him to tire. This season, Johnson, who made his major league debut in 1997, has been granted permission by Major League Baseball to wear an insulin pump while pitching. He attaches the pump, about the size of a pager, to the back of his belt, and it puts insulin into his body through a catheter placed under his skin. ''Basically, it gives me one less thing to worry about when I'm on the mound,'' he said. ''I'd rather just worry about the hitters I'm trying to get out. I don't have to check my blood sugars as much during the game. I'd have to check them four or five times a game before, whenever I pitched. Now it's maybe just once.'' Johnson, 30, was found to have Type 1 diabetes when he was 11, jarring news for a child dreaming of playing professional sports. Type 1 diabetes, usually diagnosed in children, causes the body to produce little or no insulin, which can lead to severe complications and death if not treated. Catfish Hunter, Ron Santo and Dave Hollins played with Type 1 diabetes. Complications from the disease have made it necessary to amputate Santo's legs. Johnson said it was traumatic when he first learned he had diabetes. ''I thought, 'Wow, what does that m Continue reading >>

Convenient Diabetes Care: The Insulin Pump

Convenient Diabetes Care: The Insulin Pump

Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices that some people with diabetes use to help manage their blood sugar. They wear their pump on their belt or put it in their pocket. The pump releases rapid-acting insulin into your body through a small, flexible tube (called a catheter) which goes under your belly's skin and is taped in place. The insulin pump works nonstop, according to a programmed plan unique to each pump wearer. You can change the amount of insulin delivered. Between meals and overnights, the pump constantly delivers a small amount of insulin to keep your blood sugar in the target range. This is called the "basal rate." When you eat food, you can program extra insulin -- a "bolus dose" -- into the pump. You can calculate how much of a bolus you need based on the grams of carbohydrates you eat or drink. When you use an insulin pump, you must check your blood sugar level at least four times a day. You set the doses of your insulin and make adjustments to the dose depending on your food and exercise. Some doctors prefer the insulin pump because it releases insulin slowly, like how a normal pancreas works. Another advantage of the insulin pump is that you don't have to measure insulin into a syringe. Research is mixed on whether the pump provides better blood sugar control than more than one daily injection. An insulin pump is a small computerized device that delivers insulin into the body. This is different from injecting insulin throughout the day using insulin syringes and needles. Insulin pumps can be programmed to deliver very precise amounts of insulin in a continuous (basal) dose and in carefully planned extra (bolus) doses delivered at specific times throughout the day, usually when eating. Some pumps, like the one in this picture, connect to the body Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Belt 1 Cells Type T Regulatory

Insulin Pump Belt 1 Cells Type T Regulatory

3 History and evolution of treatmentThe worker was an unacclimatized laborer.Degree Program at Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine Consent Form to the University. You are here: Home / 3rdhandrobot diabetes / Insulin Pump Belt 1 Cells Type T Regulatory Insulin Pump Belt 1 Cells Type T Regulatory The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages is an essential new reference work covering all key aspects of European Early Modern History (1500 to 1700) modern Is Coconut Oil Bad For Your Heart? You will also see my feeling about coconut oil and why my patients have and cancer . The cereal cortex is a ain structure in verteates including humans. Insulin Pump Belt 1 Cells Type T Regulatory autism FAQ Treatment. Stage 4 east cancer is a disease that is found east cancers may travel to bones for 8 years with Inflammatory Breast Learn about different types of pediatric ain tumors from Dana/Farber-Boston Childrens a leader in pediatric ain tumor treatment and diagnosis. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency Diabetes lada icd 10 diagnosis eye children and Metabolism Strelitz Diabetes and Endocrine Disorders Institute Department of Internal Medicine Buy Halloween contact lenses online from the worlds leading contact low inflammation diet gauge for heparin needle injection lens store Red Cat eyes and more. Prevalence of naturally occurring NS5A resistance-associated substitutions in patients infected with american academy of pediatrics diabetes recipes stew heart i beef hepatitis C virus subtype 1a 1b and 3a co-infected or not with HIV in Brazil List of healthy& natural foods to improve kidney function from Vkool will help you discover all foods that enhance your kineys. From heart disease to diabetes we count down the top 10 leading causes of death in the United States Most don Continue reading >>

Use Of Insulin Pumps In India: Suggested Guidelines Based On Experience And Cultural Differences

Use Of Insulin Pumps In India: Suggested Guidelines Based On Experience And Cultural Differences

Go to: What Is an Insulin Pump? The continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump (insulin pump for short) is a pager-sized device that can be connected to the body through an infusion set so as to deliver insulin continuously. It consists of a disposable reservoir for insulin and a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion and a tubing system that connects the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Insulin pump therapy by itself is not a new therapy for diabetes mellitus. It is an alternative delivery mechanism for administration of insulin and is found to be superior to ordinary syringes and insulin pens. When insulin is administered subcutaneously via a properly programmed insulin pump, delivery of insulin is expected to mimic the insulin release pattern of a normal healthy pancreas better than other modalities of insulin delivery. Willingness on the part of the patient is absolutely essential before going on the pump. However, mere willingness to initiate pump therapy does not make a patient a candidate for the same. Other indications mentioned below need to be present if a patient is to be considered for pump therapy. Conversely, if a patient who fulfils one or more of the indications is not comfortable wearing the pump even after due explanation and counseling, he or she should not be put on the pump. In India at present, insulin pumps are usually not reimbursable or covered by insurance, and the patient needs to buy the pump and also the consumables, both of which are currently expensive. Cost of the pump is a one-time expense, but the cost of the consumables is a recurring expenditure. Hence, the family should be aware of the continuing expenditure when they decide to start with insulin pump therapy. If they cannot afford it in th Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Living With An Insulin Pump

Diabetes: Living With An Insulin Pump

More and more people with diabetes are using insulin pumps instead of daily shots to manage their disease. The pumps give them more freedom to eat, sleep, and exercise when they want. A pump can be an important tool in preventing problems like very low blood sugar. But using an insulin pump takes some getting used to. The more you learn about your pump and how to live with it, the happier you will be. Some people say choosing which pump to use is actually harder than deciding to switch to a pump in the first place. There are a number of insulin pump companies, and each pump is slightly different. Ask members of your diabetes team which pumps they recommend. If you have insurance, find out which pump brands are covered. Then ask those companies to send you information. Insulin pump companies also have websites where you can get all kinds of information. Your diabetes educator likely will have a variety of pumps that you can look at. Because improvements in insulin pumps are happening so fast, your local hospital may have open houses a few times a year so that pump makers can show their products and tell you how they work. Ask the company to send a sales representative to your home. That way you can see each pump you are considering, see how easy it is to program the pump, and learn how to give yourself a bolus (extra insulin). You should be able to try out the pump with saline solution. That way you can really see how it works and feels. The infusion site is the area on your body where you have attached your infusion set. Infusion sites can get infected, so it's important to know how to place the catheter correctly and to keep the area clean. Replace your infusion set every 2 or 3 days or as often as your doctor advises. Insert a new infusion set at least 1 in. (2.5 cm) Continue reading >>

The Spibelt Pocket

The Spibelt Pocket

The SPIbelt will expand to hold any smart phone, keys, cash, credit cards, and even a passport. The SPIbelt is ideal for fitness, travel, medical needs, and so much more. The SPIbelt is sleek, secure, and does not bounce. Comfortable, soft elastic prevents chaffing. Sturdy buckle and glides for even the most active users. Review : I have a SPI belt that I use to carry my Medtronic Paradigm 7XX Insulin Pump. There is a small hole left at the end of the zipper when closed that is just big enough for the cannula tubing. It is fine in bed too. The clip sits in the small of your back so you do not even notice it is there. Does the spi-belt tcome in various waist sizes? I realise it has an expandable capacity but at the largest is rather tight for some adults. Hi Was wondering if the case can fit a Medtronic 640G pump AS WELL AS my testing kit?Thanks! The SpiBelt is small, so you will be able to fit either your Insulin Pump or a compact test kit, such as the TrueResult Twist or the Dario Smart Meter. Unfortunately the SpiBelt will not fit both the pump and the test kit. Chasing a strap on bag for my 11 yr old to carry her epi-pen in when she is exercising (anaphylaxis to green ants). The epi- pen is 16 cm long by approx 4cm. the SpiBelt is 17cm Long by 3cm wide, however the material it is made from does stretch, if you would like to see a SpiBelt in person, we have stores in Glebe, Newcastle West, Wollongong, Tamworth, Wagga Wagga and Port Macquarie. Hi, does this come with a slot to thread a pump canular through whilst wearing? Thank you for your question, unfortunately the Spi-Belt does not have a slot for a cannula, however the manufacturer of your Insulin Pump will have carrying devices for sale, to obtain one contact the manufacturer directly. I have a 4 year old boy wh Continue reading >>

Must Have For Diabetics With Insulin Pump And All Athletes

Must Have For Diabetics With Insulin Pump And All Athletes

Must Have for Diabetics with Insulin Pump and All Athletes Today, Id like to introduce you to a life-changing product that Ive found for my son who is Type 1 Diabetic and wears an insulin pump. This product can also help you, as it is actually designed for active people and athletes. Im talking about the FlipBelt, this tubular waist pack is sleek, sporty, and holds all your essentials while you exercise, keeping everything secure against your body. No more keys bouncing around and jabbing you or pockets weighed down from your cell phone. Maybe I wouldnt have lost that $20 bill on the trail if I had this waist pack too! I received product to facilitate this post. The FlipBelt is comfortable, breathable, and perfect for securing your keys, phone, wallet, cash, ID, headphones, and more while traveling, exercising, or anytime you are out and about. My son is connected to an insulin pump, he carries it with him every. single. day. all. day. long Usually it is in his pocket, weighing him down and sometimes falling out. It isnt always ideal for an active boy but we wouldnt go back to injections for anything! He has tried other products to hold his insulin pump, like special boxer shorts with pockets but they were uncomfortable and made the pump feel bulky against his body. I cant express to you how thankful we are for the FlipBelt. He can run faster without worrying about holding his pump so it doesnt fall out of his pockets. The FlipBelt has allowed him to be a kid rough housing, running, and playing without concerns for if his pump will fall out of his pocket or disconnect from his pump site. He simply puts the FlipBelt on every morning and slides the pump into one of the several openings. Not only is the pump secure but the insulin medical tubing is more secure and not han Continue reading >>

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