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Diabetes Insipidus Vs Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus Vs. Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Mellitus Vs. Diabetes Insipidus

Many people assume that since both diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus begin with the word diabetes, they must be related. They also share two common warning signs: increased thirst and excessive urination. But the truth is that these conditions are not related at all. The latin word for diabetes means "to siphon." You could say that both conditions are due to some sort of siphoning or filtering problem—one is related to sugar and the other is related to fluid. That is where the similarities end. Below is a breakdown of what you need to know about diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus. Diabetes Mellitus In diabetes mellitus, your body is unable to regulate your blood’s glucose levels. When your body breaks down food into its most simple form, it is called glucose, which is a simple sugar that is carried in the blood to other cells in your body. Glucose is energy that your body needs for daily life. To supply your body with energy, glucose must be transferred out of the blood and into your other cells. A chemical called insulin is needed for this transfer. If there is a shortage of insulin to facilitate the process, then you will have a higher glucose level in your blood. Diabetes mellitus can be summed up in this way: not enough insulin and too much glucose. Types of Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed at a young age. It is the most common form of diabetes in persons younger than 20 years old. In this form of diabetes mellitus, the pancreas, the organ responsible for producing insulin, does not function properly. This causes hyperglycemia because of a shortage in insulin production. Therefore, type 1 diabetics must rely on insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in overweight, middle-aged adults. In Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

On this page: What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that occurs when a person's kidneys pass an abnormally large volume of urine that is insipid—dilute and odorless. In most people, the kidneys pass about 1 to 2 quarts of urine a day. In people with diabetes insipidus, the kidneys can pass 3 to 20 quarts of urine a day. As a result, a person with diabetes insipidus may feel the need to drink large amounts of liquids. Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus—which includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes—are unrelated, although both conditions cause frequent urination and constant thirst. Diabetes mellitus causes high blood glucose, or blood sugar, resulting from the body's inability to use blood glucose for energy. People with diabetes insipidus have normal blood glucose levels; however, their kidneys cannot balance fluid in the body. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. Every day, the kidneys normally filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. The urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through tubes called ureters. The bladder stores urine. When the bladder empties, urine flows out of the body through a tube called the urethra, located at the bottom of the bladder. How is fluid regulated in the body? A person's body regulates fluid by balancing liquid intake and removing extra fluid. Thirst usually controls a person’s rate of liquid intake, while urination removes most fluid, although people also lose fluid through sweating, breathing, or diarrhea. The hormone vasopressin, also called antidiuretic hormone, con Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus (di) Vs Diabetes Mellitus (dm)

Diabetes Insipidus (di) Vs Diabetes Mellitus (dm)

Central diabetes insipidus Cause: the mechanism for secreting vasopressin malfunctions What do vasopressins hormones do It is an antidiauretic hormone that controls water metabolism. It is made in the hypothalamus. Stored and secreted by the posterior pituitary gland. WE WILL … what is diabetes mellitus metabolic disorders characterized by elevated blood glucose concentrations and disordered insulin metabolism what are some progressions and manifestations of diabetes mellitus ? frequent urination ( polyuria), dehydration, and increased thirst ( polydipsia). Some people may loss … gestational diabetes mellitus is inability to produce enough insulin to maintain normal glucose levels during pregnancy… glucometer a device used to measure levels of glucose in the blood, usually sampled by sticking the finger WE WILL WRITE A CUSTOM ESSAY … A syndrome characterized by excessive release of ADH from the posterior pituitary gland. SIADH Results in marked water retention and dilutional hyponatremia SIADH WE WILL WRITE A CUSTOM ESSAY SAMPLE ON ANY TOPIC SPECIFICALLY FOR YOU FOR ONLY $13.90/PAGE Write … Define Diabetes. Group of serious and chronic disorders affecting metabolism and carbohydrates Define prediabetes Also called impaired glucose tolerance Fasting blood glucose > 100-126 mg/dL WE WILL WRITE A CUSTOM ESSAY SAMPLE ON ANY TOPIC SPECIFICALLY FOR YOU FOR ONLY … 135-145 mEq/L What is normal Blood Sodium? 500-800 mOsm/kg What is normal Uosm? WE WILL WRITE A CUSTOM ESSAY SAMPLE ON ANY TOPIC SPECIFICALLY FOR YOU FOR ONLY $13.90/PAGE Write my sample 126 mg/dL What is Fasting Blood Glucose for … AIDS Aspirin Bacteria Behaviour Blood Body Brain Cancer Care Depression Disease Disorder Drug Drugs Ebola Epidemiology Exercise Fitness Health Health Care Healthcare Health Continue reading >>

Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

In nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, the kidneys produce a large volume of dilute urine because the kidney tubules fail to respond to vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) and are unable to reabsorb filtered water back into the body. Often nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is hereditary, but it can be caused by drugs or disorders that affect the kidneys. To treat nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, people restrict salt in their diet and sometimes take drugs to reduce the amount of urine excreted. Both diabetes insipidus and the better-known type of diabetes, diabetes mellitus, result in the excretion of large volumes of urine. Otherwise, the two types of diabetes are very different. Two types of diabetes insipidus exist. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus are very different, except that both cause people to excrete large amounts of urine. Causes Normally, the kidneys adjust the concentration and amount of urine according to the body’s needs. The kidneys make this adjustment in response to the level of vasopressin in the blood. Vasopressin, which is secreted by the pituitary gland, signals the kidneys to conserve water and concentrate the urine. In nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, the kidneys fail to respond to the signal. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus may be Hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus In hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, the gene that typically causes the disorder is recessive and carried on the X chromosome, one of the two sex chromosomes, so usually only males develop symptoms. However, females who carry the gene can transmit the disease to their sons. Rarely, another abnormal gene can cause nephrogenic insipidus in both males and females. Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus Symptoms People may pass from 1 to 6 gallons (3 to 20 lite Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus?

What Is The Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus?

CONTENTS What is the difference between diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus? (function(){var aa="function"==typeof Object.create?Object.create:function(a){var b=function(){};b.prototype=a;return new b},m;if("function"==typeof Object.setPrototypeOf)m=Object.setPrototypeOf;else{var n;a:{var ba={a:!0},ca={};try{ca.__proto__=ba;n=ca.a;break a}catch(a){}n=!1}m=n?function(a,b){a.__proto__=b;if(a.__proto__!==b)throw new TypeError(a+" is not extensible");return a}:null} var da=m,p=this,ea=function(a){var b=typeof a;if("object"==b)if(a){if(a instanceof Array)return"array";if(a instanceof Object)return b;var c=Object.prototype.toString.call(a);if("[object Window]"==c)return"object";if("[object Array]"==c||"number"==typeof a.length&&"undefined"!=typeof a.splice&&"undefined"!=typeof a.propertyIsEnumerable&&!a.propertyIsEnumerable("splice"))return"array";if("[object Function]"==c||"undefined"!=typeof a.call&&"undefined"!=typeof a.propertyIsEnumerable&&!a.propertyIsEnumerable("call"))return"function"}else return"null"; else if("function"==b&&"undefined"==typeof a.call)return"object";return b},ha=function(a,b){var c=Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments,1);return function(){var b=c.slice();b.push.apply(b,arguments);return a.apply(this,b)}},ia=Date.now||function(){return+new Date};var ja=Array.prototype.forEach?function(a,b){Array.prototype.forEach.call(a,b,void 0)}:function(a,b){for(var c=a.length,d="string"==typeof a?a.split(""):a,e=0;eb?null:"string"==typeof a?a.charAt(b):a[b]};var la=String.prototype.trim?function(a){return a.trim()}:function(a){return/^[\s\xa0]*([\s\S]*?)[\s\xa0]*$/.exec(a)[1 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus Vs. Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Insipidus Vs. Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes is a term used to describe two different conditions. This lesson will describe the pathologies of diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus, explaining why they have similar names despite being different disorders. Diabetes You hear 'diabetes,' and you're probably fairly certain you have an idea of what someone is talking about: some disease where a person can't eat too much sugar. You'd be right . . . sort of. There are actually two separate diseases that are unrelated, but they both have 'diabetes' in their name: diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. If they're unrelated, why do they both have 'diabetes' in their name? Excellent question. The word diabetes was coined long ago to describe a condition where someone urinated frequently. Now, 'diabetes,' sure doesn't sound like 'peeing a lot,' but it originates from a Greek word that means to 'go through,' so when someone urinates excessively, a lot of urine 'goes through' him or her. And, while diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus aren't related, a symptom they both share is excessive urination. Since their names are so similar, let's look at the second part of each name. Insipidus originates from a word in Latin that means 'no taste.' Contrast that with mellitus, which means 'honey' or 'sweet' in Latin. While this might not seem like a good clue, it actually tells you a lot. The urine in diabetes insipidus has 'no taste,' while the urine in diabetes mellitus is 'sweet,' which leads us into the pathologies of each disease. Diabetes insipidus Now don't go tasting urine to see if it is sweet or has no taste, but understanding the differences will help you see how these diseases work. Diabetes insipidus is caused by problems making, releasing, or responding to the antidiuretic hormone (or ADH) and results in Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus Vs Diabetes Insipidus

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus Vs Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus (DI) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are two medical conditions which are often confused as meaning the same thing. However, you should not mistake DI for DM which occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or becomes resistant to insulin. DI is associated with excessive urination and thirst. Hence, when you consider DI vs DM, you should know that they are not related in any way, though they may share the same symptoms such as excessive urination and excessive thirst. DM is a common condition compared to DI, which is rare. This could be attributed to the fact that DM is more prevalent compared to DI. That means there is a higher number of people diagnosed with DM compared to those diagnosed with DI. Another reason would be that DM is a serious medical condition which requires adopting a healthy lifestyle, such as exercise and diet, and insulin therapy. Any changes in these factors could be fatal in the long or short term. However, DI is not considered as serious a medical condition and can be managed by drinking enough fluids every day. What is DI? Diabetes insipidus is a rare medical condition characterized by high passage of urine due to kidney problems. This condition usually occurs when there is an imbalance of fluids in the body as a result of the kidney failing to regulate body fluids properly. This results in excessive thirst, even after taking water, and excessive urination (polyuria). Because of the high passage of urine, patients with DI may become dehydrated if they do not drink enough water to make up for the lost fluids. When functioning properly, your kidneys will remove excess water from your blood. This water waste will be stored in the bladder in the form urine which will be excreted from your body as urine. In case the fluid reg Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Main Difference Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the body is unable to produce enough insulin to maintain the blood glucose level resulting in high glucose level in blood. Diabetes is a general term for diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is a disease characterized by excessive thirst with excretion of large amount of diluted urine. Diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus are two totally different medical conditions. In diabetes mellitus polyuria is because of osmotic diuresis while in diabetes insipidus polyuria is because of diminished production of ADH (antidiuretic hormone) or kidney’s response to ADH. Diabetes mellitus commonly referred as diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which the blood glucose level is prolonged for a long time. Diabetes is due to cells of pancreas do not produce enough insulin or the cells of the body do not response adequately to the insulin produced. Diabetes mellitus is classified into type I DM and type II DM. Type I DM also known as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile diabetes. In type I DM cells of pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to maintain the blood glucose level. The etiology of type I DM is unknown. Type II DM also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult onset diabetes. In type II DM body’s cells fails to respond to insulin produced by pancreas. Type II DM primary cause is excessive weight gain and not enough activity. There is also another type of diabetes that occur during pregnancy known as gestational diabetes. Symptoms of untreated diabetes mellitus are polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia and weight loss. Symptoms can be developed within one month of type I DM while in type II DM the symptoms develop much more slowly. Type I DM can be treated on Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Print Overview Diabetes insipidus (die-uh-BEE-teze in-SIP-uh-dus) is an uncommon disorder that causes an imbalance of water in the body. This imbalance leads to intense thirst even after drinking fluids (polydipsia), and excretion of large amounts of urine (polyuria). While the names diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus sound similar, they're not related. Diabetes mellitus — which can occur as type 1 or type 2 — is the more common form of diabetes. There's no cure for diabetes insipidus, but treatments are available to relieve your thirst and normalize your urine output. Symptoms The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes insipidus are: Extreme thirst Excretion of an excessive amount of diluted urine Depending on the severity of the condition, urine output can be as much as 16 quarts (about 15 liters) a day if you're drinking a lot of fluids. Normally, a healthy adult will urinate an average of less than 3 quarts (about 3 liters) a day. Other signs may include needing to get up at night to urinate (nocturia) and bed-wetting. Infants and young children who have diabetes insipidus may have the following signs and symptoms: Unexplained fussiness or inconsolable crying Trouble sleeping Fever Vomiting Diarrhea Delayed growth Weight loss When to see a doctor See your doctor immediately if you notice the two most common signs of diabetes insipidus: excessive urination and extreme thirst. Causes Diabetes insipidus occurs when your body can't regulate how it handles fluids. Normally, your kidneys remove excess body fluids from your bloodstream. This fluid waste is temporarily stored in your bladder as urine, before you urinate. When your fluid regulation system is working properly, your kidneys conserve fluid and make less urine when your body water is decreased, suc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Vs. Diabetes Insipidus: What's The Difference?

Diabetes Mellitus Vs. Diabetes Insipidus: What's The Difference?

The word diabetes is related to excess urination or polyuria. In physiology, we study two types of diabetes. One is diabetes mellitus, and other is diabetes insipidus. Both of the diseases are way different from each other due their cause and origin etc., but they have one thing in common: excess urination. Diabetes mellitus is a most common type of diabetes; it is characterized by excess glucose level in the blood that is followed by excess urination. And, diabetes insipidus is the disorder characterized by the excess urination due to function instability of ADH or lack of ADH, in this excess water is lost from the body which results in many serious conditions like dehydration, etc. The main difference in between diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus is the hormone. In diabetes mellitus Insulin is involved, whereas in diabetes insipidus ADH is involved. AdHealthPlus50 Visit Site Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Insipidus Glucose Level In diabetes mellitus, blood glucose level is high. In diabetes insipidus, the glucose level is normal, but excess water is lost. Hormone Diabetes mellitus is related to a hormone called insulin. Diabetes insipidus is related to hormone ADH. Gland In diabetes mellitus, a gland that is involved is the pancreas. In diabetes insipidus, pituitary gland is involved. Types of Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is more common in types of diabetes. Diabetes insipidus is less seen. Symptoms In diabetes mellitus, patient feel hungry due to loss of glucose in urine. In diabetes insipidus, the patient feels thirsty due to loss of excess water. Diabetes means excess urination and Mellitus means honey. Diabetes mellitus is the most common disorder seen around. This disorder is characterized by excess glucose in the blood which leads to polyurea. Normal blood gluco Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus

The word Diabetes is well known and it is mostly associated with a disease involving difficulties with sugar. There are actually two unrelated diseases named Diabetes - Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus. This article is to highlight each and to show the differences between the two. Similarities Both diseases are dependent on the action of hormones; Insulin for Diabetes Mellitus and Vasopressin for Diabetes Insipidus. Insulin is produced in the pancreas. Vasopressin is produced by the Hypothalamus and stored in the pituitary gland. Insulin is necessary for the utilization of sugar/glucose. Vasopressin is the hormone that regulates the body’s retention of water. In both the diseases there are variances derived the same way. A lack of or not enough of the hormone and a specific type of the disease is present. A lack of Insulin and the disease is Diabetes Mellitus Type 1. A lack of Vasopressin and the disease is Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus. When the body is unable to use the hormone effectively another condition is present. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2, when the cells are insulin resistant. When the kidneys are insensitive to vasopressin, Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus (vasopressin-resistant) is the result. During pregnancy, the body is subjected to a multitude of diverse hormones and chemical reactions, caused mostly by the placenta. This hormonal imbalance can cause a temporary disease that occurs only during the pregnancy. The resistance to Insulin results in gestational diabetes mellitus. A deficiency of vasopressin causes gestagenic diabetes insipidus, also known as gestational diabetes insipidus. With both diseases, the body returns to normal shortly (four to six weeks) after the delivery. Diabetes Insipidus have a fourth condition, with no equivalent in diabet Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Polyuria And Diabetes Insipidus

Diagnosis Of Polyuria And Diabetes Insipidus

DEFINITION Polyuria has generally been defined as a urine output exceeding 3 L/day in adults and 2 L/m2 in children. It must be differentiated from the more common complaints of frequency or nocturia, which are not associated with an increase in the total urine output. The following is an overview of the diagnosis of polyuria and diabetes insipidus (DI). The causes and treatment of polyuria due to central or nephrogenic DI are presented separately. (See "Clinical manifestations and causes of central diabetes insipidus" and "Clinical manifestations and causes of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus" and "Treatment of central diabetes insipidus" and "Treatment of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus".) CAUSES In the absence of a glucose-induced osmotic diuresis in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, there are three major causes of polyuria in the outpatient setting, each of which is due to a defect in water balance leading to the excretion of large volumes of dilute urine (urine osmolality usually below 250 mosmol/kg): primary polydipsia, which is primarily seen in adults and adolescents; central DI; and nephrogenic DI [1]. Primary polydipsia — Primary polydipsia (sometimes called psychogenic polydipsia) is characterized by a primary increase in water intake. This disorder is most often seen in middle-aged women and in patients with psychiatric illnesses, including those taking a phenothiazine, which can lead to the sensation of a dry mouth. Primary polydipsia can also be induced by hypothalamic lesions that directly affect the thirst center, as may occur with an infiltrative disease such as sarcoidosis [1]. (See "Causes of hyponatremia in adults".) Central DI — Central DI (also called neurohypophyseal or neurogenic DI) is associated with deficient secretion of antidiuretic hormone ( Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare condition that leads to frequent urination (passing a lot of clear urine) and excessive thirst. The condition may be caused by problems with your pituitary gland and/or your kidneys. DI is not related to diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2 diabetes), which is when your levels of blood sugar (glucose) are too high. How does your body regulate fluid? The amount of fluid in your body is a balance between how much liquid you drink and how much urine you make. Your kidneys and bladder are part of the system. Your kidneys remove extra fluid from your blood. If there' extra fluid in your system, your kidneys send it to your bladder. Your bladder stores and then excretes extra fluid as urine. If you take in less water, the kidneys make less urine and send water back into your blood. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH, also sometimes called vasopressin) is released if you get dehydrated and the sodium level in the blood rises, which helps your kidneys retain water. How is DI diagnosed? Your doctor has several ways to check for DI and to find the cause: Analysis of urine samples Blood tests to see how your pituitary gland is working A fluid deprivation test, which shows how well the kidneys are working. The test monitors the amount of urine made over the course of several hours without drinking fluids. You also might have an imaging test of your head (an MRI) to check for problems with your pituitary gland. Your doctor also may order genetic tests. What are the complications of DI? Taking too much desmopressin and/or drinking lots of fluids may cause low sodium levels in the blood, which can lead to headache, nausea, confusion, seizures or, in rare cases, death. Other complications are dehydration, low blood pressure, and high Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes Insipidus Vs. Diabetes Mellitus?

What Is Diabetes Insipidus Vs. Diabetes Mellitus?

Diabetes mellitus is a condition caused by a lack of insulin or resistance to it, but what is diabetes insipidus? You may think, since they have a similar name, that diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus are related, but that could not be further from the truth. Diabetes insipidus (or DI) is a very rare disorder which has many of the common symptoms associated with diabetes mellitus, but the two conditions are totally unrelated. Occasionally, DI is called “water diabetes” to make a distinction between it and the more prevalent diabetes mellitus, otherwise known as “sugar diabetes.” What is Diabetes Insipidus Characterized By? The primary characteristic of DI is urinating often. However, as opposed to other forms of diabetes, the urine is not loaded with glucose but instead is heavily diluted, it’s mostly water. The repeated urination results in the need to drink a lot more. This interferes with sleep due to the necessity to get up during the night to use the bathroom, and may on occasion bring about involuntary urination while asleep (bedwetting). Youngsters with this condition might be cranky or lethargic and may even have fever, diarrhea or vomiting What is Diabetes Insipidus’ 4 Types? Diabetes Insipidus is categorized into 4 different types, each one with different treatments and causes. These 4 forms of DI are: Neurogenic (or Central): This is the most widespread form of DI and is the result of a shortage of vasopressin, the hormone which usually acts on the kidneys to lessen urine production. This is typically a result of damage to the rear of your pituitary gland which is where vasopressin is created. The pituitary gland could be damaged by a number of illnesses as well as tumors, bacterial infections, head trauma along with hereditary defects. Neur Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus And Mellitus With Optic Atrophy And Deafness (didmoad)

Diabetes Insipidus And Mellitus With Optic Atrophy And Deafness (didmoad)

(also known as Wolfram Syndrome) A syndrome involving Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness (DIDMOAD) is recessively inherited and results from a mutation in the transmembrane gene, WFS1. Presentation is usually in the first decade, with insulin dependent diabetes and optic atrophy. Diabetes insipidus and sensorineural deafness occur in the second decade, renal tract outflow problems in the third, and multiple neurological problems (including ataxia) in the fourth. Death usually follows respiratory failure due to brain stem atrophy, and few patients live beyond middle age. GENETIC TESTING IN WOLFRAM SYNDROME The diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome is clinical, based on the combination of childhood onset diabetes mellitus and progressive optic atrophy. In some circumstances genetic testing can be useful, provided it is offered in conjunction with professional genetic counselling. We directly sequenced the WFS1 gene in 19 families with Wolfram syndrome, and found nonsense, frameshift and deletion mutations in 17 families (Hardy et al, 1999). We have since piloted a genetic testing service, offering screening of exon 8 of the WFS1 gene. This is the largest exon, and our studies have shown that 90% of mutations are located within this exon. We estimate that screening exon 8 in patients who fulfill the clinical criteria will identify at least 1 disease causing mutation in 85% of patients. For further details, please contact: Dr Tim Barrett Children Nationwide Senior Lecturer Paediatrics Diabetes Unit Birmingham Children’s Hospital Steelhouse Lane Birmingham B4 6NH Hardy H, Khanim F, Torres R, Scott-Brown M, Sellar A, Poulton J, Collier D, Kirk J, Polymeropoulos M, Latif F, Barrett T. Mutation analysis and preliminary genotype/phenotype analysis in 19 Continue reading >>

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