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Diabetes Insipidus Natural Treatment Dog

Canine Diabetes Insipidus: Symptoms And Treatment

Canine Diabetes Insipidus: Symptoms And Treatment

Central diabetes insipidus in dogs is usually diagnosed in the middle age, while nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is generally detected in the first year of life. Diabetes insipidus, also known as the 'other type of diabetes', is a condition where the body fails to maintain water balance. This can result either from a failure of the body to produce or release a sufficient amount of the antidiuretic hormone (ADH) (also known as vasopressin), or an inability of the kidneys to respond to this hormone. Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder, and is quite different from diabetes mellitus, which is caused by a deficiency of the hormone insulin, or an inability of the body cells to respond to this hormone. The hormone vasopressin is produced in the hypothalamus, but then stored in the pituitary gland. So, it is released from the pituitary gland that is located at the base of the brain. Vasopressin or ADH is responsible for regulating water retention by the kidneys. There are mainly two types of diabetes insipidus - central diabetes insipidus and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Central diabetes insipidus is caused by an insufficient production of ADH, while nephrogenic diabetes insipidus refers to the condition, wherein the kidneys fail to respond to ADH properly. Another type of diabetes insipidus is psychogenic polydipsia or dipsogenic diabetes insipidus. This condition is not caused by a problem in the production of ADH. Rather, it is associated with an excessive intake of water or fluid, which results in the excretion of a large volume of dilute urine. This condition is also known as primary polydipsia. » Diabetes insipidus is considered to be idiopathic in nature, which means that what exactly causes this disorder is not known with certainty. However, the central diabetes in Continue reading >>

Controlled Diet For Dog Diabetes

Controlled Diet For Dog Diabetes

Dog diabetes usually surfaces between ages 7 and 9 and one out of every 10 dogs will suffer from diabetes. It is known that female dogs are more susceptible to diabetes than males because of changes in their hormones. The most common type of diabetes in dogs is diabetes Mellitus. Insulin is produced in the pancreas and helps to control the level of glucose in the blood. When your dog has diabetes, there is not enough natural insulin produced to slow the glucose production to the bloodstream. If the level of glucose in the blood gets too high (hyperglycemia), it can reach the kidneys and cause frequent urination. Because your dog is urinating so much, he is likely drinking a lot. It is an annoying cycle that needs to be caught right away. There is no cure for dog diabetes but it can be managed. If diabetes is left untreated it can lead to serious illness and even death. Symptoms of diabetes in dogs need to be caught early on to help prevent serious side effects and provide relief for your dog. Remember that your dog cannot tell you what is wrong with him. It is up to you to watch out for abnormal behavior in your dog. Diabetes is very common in dogs, and if it is not treated properly it can lead to coma, paralysis and even death. There are three different forms of dog diabetes: diabetes Mellitus, diabetes Insipidus and Gestational Diabetes. The most common of the three is diabetes Mellitus, often referred to as the sugar diabetes. All three forms of diabetes display similar symptoms — with the most common symptoms listed below. Urinating Noticeably More than Usual If your dog frequently urinates throughout the day it could be a symptom of diabetes in dogs. Increased urination is caused by excess glucose which is not processed normally, so your dog will try to get rid o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs: Symptoms & Treatments

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs: Symptoms & Treatments

Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus are two different types of diabetes in dogs, and both can be serious if left untreated. Diabetes insipidus is also known as “water diabetes” and is the more rare form. It affects water metabolism and prevents the body from conserving water, which results in increased urination and diluted, almost clear urine. It is not related to diabetes mellitus in canines, which is also known as “sugar diabetes.” Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas that affects the body’s ability to convert food into fuel. Here is what you should know about the symptoms and treatments for diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Symptoms Of Diabetes In Dogs Diabetes insipidus comes in two forms in canines, and both are related to the pituitary gland and result in similar symptoms. Central diabetes insipidus happens when the pituitary doesn’t release enough of a hormone called vassopressin, an anti-diuretic. This can be caused by birth defect, head injury, or tumor. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is the other form. It happens when the kidneys don’t respond to the vassopressin that the pituitary produces. It can be caused by birth defect, exposure to drugs, metabolic disorders, or renal failure. Both types will result in the following symptoms in dogs. Excessive urination Excessive drinking and thirst Weight loss Decreased urination due to dehydration Poor coat health Accidents in the house Diabetes mellitus is a pancreatic condition that also comes in two forms in canines. Insulin-deficiency diabetes mellitus is when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin, a hormone that tells the body’s cells to take glucose, a type of sugar, from the bloodstream to use as fuel. Insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus happens when the body produces e Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs: Signs, Symptoms, Causes And Treatment

Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs: Signs, Symptoms, Causes And Treatment

What is diabetes insipidus in dogs? Diabetes insipidus (DI) in dogs is a rare medical condition that is characterized by increased thirst and urination. Because of increased thirst, dogs with DI will drink large amounts of fluids. If dogs with DI do not drink enough fluids to compensate for the lost fluids via urine, they can become dehydrated. Despite sharing the same name, diabetes insipidus is not related in any way to diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition characterized by high blood sugar levels because the body cannot produce enough insulin or use it properly. Insulin is a natural hormone, which helps process glucose to be used by the body’s cells for energy. DI, however, is a result of problems with water metabolism, not sugar. Therefore, dogs that are diagnosed with DI can still have normal blood sugar levels. DI in dogs occurs when the antidiuretic or ADH hormone is not secreted in sufficient amounts by the brain. It also sometimes occurs if kidney cells do not properly respond to these hormones. This results in excretion of dilute urine and increased thirst in dogs. Usually, the kidney works by removing excess fluids from the bloodstream. The fluids are then temporarily stored in the bladder in the form of urine. When the fluid regulation system is working properly, the kidneys will store fluids and excrete small amounts of insulin when the dog is dehydrated or thirsty. This normal regulation of body fluids in dogs is achieved by the release of the ADH hormone. The antidiuretic hormone is normally released when the dog is dehydrated. This natural hormone works by triggering the kidney to release body fluids into the blood rather than excreting it as urine. However, in dogs with DI, the ADH hormone does not properly regulate the fluids in Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes Insipidus

Canine Diabetes Insipidus

Natural dogs health can prevent and treat every disease under the sun. It can do this because the focus is on the immune system rather than the disease or condition. With a strong immune system, your dog is able to sail through any problem unscathed, including canine diabetes insipidus. People know the more common diabetes mellitus, which is normally a direct result of poor nutrition and excess weight. This is the sugar diabetes, when not enough insulin is produced. When the nutrition and weight problems are rectified, the diabetes mellitus can be successfully treated. Diabetes insipidus is the less common version. Essentially it is an imbalance of water in the body. There are two types – the central type and the nephrogenic type. The central type involves malfunction of the pituitary gland. The nephrogenic type involves kidney malfunction. In both types, your dog will have an increased thirst and an increased urine output, much like diabetes mellitus, but also similar to renal and liver problems as well as Cushings disease. If your dog is an outside dog, these symptoms can go unnoticed. Common causes can be diet, medications, inbreeding or a metabolic disorder. Diagnosis is normally by eliminating other conditions, so is not definitive. Veterinary treatment involves eye or nasal drops or constant injections. These are often toxic, creating the need for stronger or more frequent medication over time. The best way to treat (or prevent) diabetes insipidus naturally is to feed your dog a quality, healthy, natural diet, one that will boost his immune system, and to ensure all his health treatment is toxin free. Natural dogs health covers both a healthy diet and a natural approach to health care. Homeopathy probably offers you the deepest and most effective treatment there Continue reading >>

Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is an inability to concentrate urine due to impaired renal tubule response to vasopressin (ADH), which leads to excretion of large amounts of dilute urine. It can be inherited or occur secondary to conditions that impair renal concentrating ability. Symptoms and signs include polyuria and those related to dehydration and hypernatremia. Diagnosis is based on measurement of urine osmolality changes after water deprivation and administration of exogenous vasopressin. Treatment consists of adequate free water intake, thiazide diuretics, NSAIDs, and a low-salt, low-protein diet. NDI is characterized by inability to concentrate urine in response to vasopressin. Central diabetes insipidus is characterized by lack of vasopressin. Either type of diabetes insipidus may be complete or partial. Acquired NDI Acquired NDI can occur when disorders (many of which are tubulointerstitial diseases) or drugs disrupt the medulla or distal nephrons and impair urine concentrating ability, making the kidneys appear insensitive to vasopressin. These disorders include the following: Acquired NDI can also be idiopathic. A mild form of acquired NDI can occur in any patient who is elderly or sick or who has acute or chronic renal insufficiency. NDI is suspected in any patient with polyuria. In infants, polyuria may be noticed by the caregivers; if not, the first manifestation may be dehydration. Initial testing includes 24-h urine collection (without fluid restriction) for volume and osmolality, and serum electrolytes. Patients with NDI excrete > 50 mL/kg of urine/day (polyuria). If urine osmolality is < 300 mOsm/kg (water diuresis), central diabetes insipidus or NDI is likely. With NDI, urine osmolality is typically < 200 mOsm/kg despite clinical signs of hypov Continue reading >>

How To Treat Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs

How To Treat Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs

Edit Article Diabetes insipidus is a rare disease that affects young dogs that are less than a year old. The condition causes a dog’s body to become unable to concentrate urine, so the dog has a hard time retaining fluid. If your dog has diabetes insipidus, it is very important that you can spot the signs of dehydration, which are discussed in Method 1. 1 Understand why it is important to check for dehydration. A dog with diabetes insipidus who is denied water will initially be agitated and restless, as he seeks water but can't find any. As he becomes dehydrated there are relatively few warning signs, unless you specifically look for things such as dry gums and test his scruff for hydration. Unfortunately, if the dehydration is undetected the blood supply to major organs will be reduced and those organs (of which the kidneys are especially sensitive) will go into failure. The first signs of this could be vomiting and collapse. 2 There should be moisture present; if the gums are dry this could point to early dehydration. 3 Use the scruff method. You can also use your dog’s skin as a way to check for dehydration. Lift the scuff of skin located in between his shoulders; lift it away from his body and then release it. A well hydrated dog’s skin will fall back into place immediately. A dog who is dehydrated will have skin that “tents”, which means that after you release it, it stays peaked and very slowly returns to its original position. 1 Troubleshoot your dog’s need to urinate frequently. A dog with diabetes insipidus pretty much needs constant access to an outside area. Installing a doggie door is a good way to handle this.[1] Another might be the canine equivalent of a cat-litter box, perhaps utilizing the large type of tray used by garage's to collect oil d Continue reading >>

Hormonal Disorders: Diabetes Overview

Hormonal Disorders: Diabetes Overview

Overview: Diabetes in small animals is found in two different forms, diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus. In dogs, diabetes mellitus is more common, while diabetes insipidus occurs less frequently. Diabetes mellitus refers to a deficiency of insulin associated with disorders in carbohydrate metabolism. Diabetes insipidus on other hand is caused by a reduced secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH). Polyuria or frequent and large volumes of urination is a common sign of diabetes along with other complications such as suppressed immune response, weakened eye sight and others. The treatment plan usually involves a complete nutrition plan, oral administration of glycocemides (initiates production of calcium which in turn stimulates natural production of insulin) and insulin induction. Diabetes may be congenital (inherited), due to poor nutrition (high carbohydrate diets can trigger canine diabetes) and sometimes due to a reaction to some drugs, so care is always needed to prevent its occurrence. Causes: As mentioned above, diabetes occurs in two different forms in dogs, diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus. Diabetes mellitus is termed a disorder of carbohydrate metabolism (such as sugar) associated with decreased insulin production. This condition may be congenital, or may be due to a secondary destruction of islet cells, as in pancreatitis. Diabetes mellitus in dogs may occur due to several drugs. Excessive use of corticosteroids in dogs may cause diabetes mellitus, similarly progesterone if is produced in larger quantities, may cause hyperglycemia in dogs, which causes diabetes mellitus in dogs. Diabetes insipidus on other hand is due to the reduced secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) in dogs. This is an uncommon form of diabetes in dogs. Injury, neoplasm, cys Continue reading >>

Urinating Too Much?

Urinating Too Much?

Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disease that causes increased urination (indeed, the literal meaning of the Greek term “diabetes” is “excessing urine discharge”). The kind of diabetes that we usually encounter is diabetes mellitus (from the Greek word for “sweet”), also known as DM and “sugar diabetes.” In DM, the increased urinary output is a symptom of excess sugar in the blood (and urine) due to problems with insulin, whereas in DI, the urine is insipid (tasteless) because it is very dilute. The large volume excreted is mostly water. Blood sugar and insulin levels are normal in DI, which has nothing in common with DM except the name. There are several forms of DI. The most common is called central or pituitary DI and stems from damage to the pituitary gland as a result of head injury, brain surgery or, sometimes, a tumor. The disease can run in families and can also be caused by certain drugs like lithium. In 25 percent of all cases, no cause can be found. Whatever the cause, the pituitary damage disrupts the normal release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH). Made in the adjacent hypothalamus, ADH is stored in the pituitary and released into the bloodstream as necessary. It controls water balance in the body by directing the kidneys to reabsorb water and decrease urinary output when necessary. The ADH deficiency that characterizes DI results in constant water loss through excessive production of dilute urine. Affected individuals may feel thirsty all the time. The frequent urination continues at night, disrupting sleep and, sometimes, causing bedwetting. And you risk dehydration if you don’t drink enough water to make up for what you lose. (Always have a water supply with you.) If the symptoms don’t bother you, you may not need treatment – but you Continue reading >>

Herbal Dog Remedies For Canine Diabetes

Herbal Dog Remedies For Canine Diabetes

Yes, dogs can have diabetes. In fact, dog diabetes is very much like the condition in humans. Canine diabetes occurs when the animal’s pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to adequately metabolize glucose and allow it to be used as energy by the cells. When the cells fail to take up the glucose, it builds up in the bloodstream, which can cause damage to several organs. Any breed of dog can develop diabetes mellitus, although it’s seen more often in schnauzers, poodles, Samoyeds, English setters, and Yorkshire terriers. Dog diabetes can also strike any age, although it’s more commonly seen in older dogs and dogs of middle-age. It’s also more prevalent in females and overweight individuals. There are two types of diabetes that can affect dogs – Type I diabetes and diabetes insipidus, but diabetes insipidus is rare. Most canine diabetes is the Type I, also known as “insulin dependent diabetes.” Symptoms of canine diabetes Symptoms of dog diabetes can vary from dog to dog, but the most common symptoms are increased urination, excessive thirst, abdominal pain, a decrease in muscle mass, and cloudy eyes, which can be a symptom of cataracts. Because an affected dog can’t properly utilize glucose for energy, it’s usually lethargic. The dog might display an increased appetite and eat more, although it might actually lose weight. Effects of dog diabetes If dog diabetes is left untreated, there can be numerous complications. Sores and other types of injuries will be slow to heal, and internal organs can be permanently damaged. The organs most at risk from diabetes mellitus are the kidneys, liver, and heart. The disease can also result in blindness, susceptibility to infections, and a shortened lifespan. Herbal dog remedy treatments for dog diabetes If your pe Continue reading >>

Water Diabetes In Dogs

Water Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes Insipidus, also called Water Diabetes, is a disease affecting dogs, cats, rats, and occasionally other animals. In this disease, a hormone called ADH is either not secreted in sufficient amounts by the brain, or is not properly recognized by specific cells in the kidneys. This results in extreme thirst and frequent evacuation of very diluted urine. Essentially, the animal’s body is trying to rid itself of more water than is needed for normal urination. This condition is not usually life-threatening, but is inconvenient for the owner and stressful for the animal. However, primary kidney disease, a much more serious condition, may display these same symptoms, and so extreme thirst paired with frequent, lengthy urination is cause for a visit to the veterinarian. Diabetes Insipidus is a disease of the urinary system, where either insufficient amount of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) is secreted by the hypothalamus, or target cells in the kidneys have lost the ability to respond to normal levels of ADH. This lack of communication between the brain and the kidneys results in polyuria with hypotonic urine and extreme thirst. Owners noting frequent urination above what is normal for their pet should monitor the amount of water the animal consumes and the color of their urine. If this pattern of drinking and urination persists, make an appointment with your veterinarian, as the much more serious primary kidney disease could be occurring. The veterinarian will first rule out primary kidney disease, and then evaluate your pet’s ability to concentrate urine with a water deprivation test. This is done by waiting for the pet to empty their bladder, then withholding food and water for 3-8 hours, which often stimulates ADH to be produced. The animal should be carefully monitor Continue reading >>

Treatment And Prognosis Of Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs

Treatment And Prognosis Of Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs

The goals of treating dogs with diabetes insipidus are to find and address the underlying cause of the condition and to correct the excessive water intake and urine output. Treatment Options If the dog has central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and is not producing or secreting sufficient antidiuretic hormone (ADH), exogenous ADH can be administered either orally in tablet form, or into the corner of the eye (conjunctival sac) in liquid drop form. The actual synthetic drug is called desmopressin acetate, or DDAVP. Dogs with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) or psychogenic polydipsia will not respond to this treatment, because the cause of their condition is not abnormally low circulating levels of ADH. Certain diuretic drugs can be administered orally to increase sodium and water reabsorption by the kidneys and decrease urine output. A low sodium diet can be extremely beneficial as well. All of these treatment options should be discussed thoroughly with the dog’s veterinarian. If the dog’s elevated thirst, increased water intake and increased urine output are well tolerated by and not overly disruptive to the dog’s owner, it may not be necessary to treat the condition. Any dog with diabetes insipidus must have free access to fresh water at all times, with the exception that it may be wise to restrict access to water for a very short period of time after DDAVP is administered, to help prevent cellular overhydration. Prognosis Dogs that have either congenital or idiopathic diabetes insipidus, and many with central diabetes insipidus, typically respond quite well to oral treatment with DDAVP and go on to live full, normal lives. Dogs with central diabetes insipidus caused by pituitary tumors have a more guarded prognosis. Dogs with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus also ha Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes Insipidus

Canine Diabetes Insipidus

Site Navigation Signs And Symptoms Cataracts And Treatment Prescription Food Diabetes Mellitus Gestational Diabetes Diabetes Insipidus Diabetes Diets Canine Diabetes Guide Special Offers First-Aid Handbook The main symptoms of Diabetes Insipidus are an abnormal increase in urine output, fluid intake and often thirst. It causes your pet to urinate frequently because the urine output is not as concentrated as normal and instead of being a yellow color, the urine is pale, colorless or watery in appearance and the measured concentration (osmolality or specific gravity) is low. Canine Diabetes Insipidus resembles Diabetes Mellitus in Dogs because the symptoms of both diseases are similar, increased urination and thirst. However, in every other respect, including the causes and treatment, the diseases are completely unrelated. Sometimes diabetes insipidus is referred to as "water" diabetes to distinguish it from the more common Diabetes Mellitus or "sugar" diabetes and comes in two flavors; Treatment: Diabetes Insipidus is treated using desmopressin, also known as DDAVP. This medication can be given as eye drops, nose drops, or injected subcutaneously. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus is treated with prescribed medications such as thiazide diuretics, chlorothiazide, chloropropamide and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Salt is also restricted. Canine Diabetes Management Guide When a well-loved pet is first diagnosed, we often allow our hearts to rule our thinking, without realizing the full implications of our decision. Having a family pet destroyed is not an option for many of us yet it can take several years before the full implication of commitment to treatment becomes apparent. The Canine Diabetes Management Guide walks you through the process, from the symptoms and fir Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs: Symptoms, Treatment & Life Expectancy

Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs: Symptoms, Treatment & Life Expectancy

This lesson teaches you about a disorder dogs can experience, called diabetes insipidus. You'll learn its definition, causes, signs, symptoms, treatment options, as well as some prognoses. What Is Diabetes Insipidus? Imagine that all day and every day you have extreme thirst followed up by an urge to urinate large volumes of urine on a frequent basis. This can happen with a condition called diabetes insipidus, in both humans and dogs. This uncommon disorder occurs when the brain either secretes an insufficient amount of a hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or the kidneys don't respond to it. ADH tells the kidneys to stop making urine and to start preserving water within the body. Let's learn about the signs, treatments, and life expectancy surrounding this condition in dogs. Signs & Symptoms If the brain doesn't make enough ADH or the kidneys pay no attention to it, the kidneys will make a lot of urine and deplete the body of lots of water as a result. And what happens when you are dehydrated? You drink a lot! Thus, it should be no surprise that diabetes insipidus in the dog will lead to: Polydipsia 'Poly-' means many or much and '-dipsia' refers to a condition of thirst. Thus, the dog will feel extremely thirsty and, as a result, polydipsia will also manifest itself via the consumption of large amounts of liquids over and over again. Polyuria, where '-uria' refers to a condition of the urine. Polyuria manifests itself as an abnormally excessive passage of urine (volume-wise). The dog may also have to go to the bathroom more frequently as well. Inappropriate urination within the home, if the dog is not walked frequently enough. Disorientation, extreme lethargy and/or lack of mobility, ataxia (stumbling around as if drunk), seizures, and death can occur if a dog's Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers About Dog Diabetes

Questions And Answers About Dog Diabetes

There are many questions most dog lovers have about canine diabetes. Most people don’t really understand what it is, how a dog gets it, how it’s treated and so on. So below is a list of dog diabetes questions and answers you will find very useful. What Is Canine Diabetes? Canine diabetes is a lifelong condition caused by an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin. Diabetic dogs can not metabolize sugar properly. Insulin deficiency results in glycosuria (high urine sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). If left untreated, this condition can lead to dehydration, blindness, malnutrition, neuropathy, and death. A diabetic pet may want to eat constantly, but will appear malnourished because his body cells can not absorb glucose. Canine diabetes is a treatable condition, and many diabetic dogs can lead happy lives. Are All Dogs Susceptible to Diabetes? This disease affects over 70 percent of dogs over seven years old. Diabetes is more common in females and neutered males. Siberian huskies, fox terriers, schnauzers, miniature pinschers, poodles, Australian terriers, cairn terriers, collies, and English setters may be at higher risk. Pedigree analysis has identified a genetic predisposition in Samoyeds and Keeshonds. This condition affects one in 500 dogs. Unspayed females are twice as likely as male dogs to develop diabetes. What Are the Main Types of Canine Diabetes? Just like humans, dogs can develop two types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes or juvenile-onset diabetes is a congenital disease caused due to insufficient production of insulin. This condition may occur in young dogs and puppies. Type 2 diabetes is an acquired disease that affects senior dogs between seven and nine years of age. This form of diabetes is often linked to diet and obesity. Dogs can also de Continue reading >>

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