diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Infographic 2017

Infographic: 4 Signs You Might Have Diabetes

Infographic: 4 Signs You Might Have Diabetes

Infographic: 4 signs you might have diabetes gary valente January 26, 2017 at 10:57 am Reply Doctor, my A1C is 6. I am a 62 year old maleI do not drink sugared soda, nor use sugar on my foods and eat only sugar free bakery goodsI do exercise regularly.what else can I do ?thank you Karen January 26, 2017 at 12:19 pm Reply I have no history of diabetes but borderline fasting blood glucose at annual checkups, A1C was high once a few years ago but normal when rechecked. The past week Ive noticed a tingling in my right thumb that comes and goes, and it radiates up my right arm when exercising. Could this be related to pre-diabetes/diabetes? Cletus January 26, 2017 at 4:50 pm Reply Just a few words of encouragement. In April 2015 I was diagnosed with diabetes (a1c @ 6.5, glucose @ 156), hypertension (151/101, pulse 107), high cholesterol (total @ 231, triglycerides @ 334), and BMI of 29.49. My doctor put me on 1000mg Metformin and allowed me to fix the other issues myself through diet and exercise. As of August 2016 I no longer take any medication, my a1c is now 5.3, glucose at or below 90, blood pressure averages 110/65 pulse 55, cholesterol 165, triglycerides 69, BMI 23.2. My exercise consists of walking, bike riding and weights; nothing crazy. I just want to illustrate the point that these conditions can be reversed, and I did it at 51 years old. You have to be committed to getting, and staying, healthy. Well worth the journey. Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Key facts The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (1). The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014 (1). Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**. Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030 (1). Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2015, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is charact Continue reading >>

International Diabetes Federation - Infographics

International Diabetes Federation - Infographics

A series of infographics are available for download, providing general information on diabetes, its complications, the importance of screening to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and the women and diabetes theme. The infographics can be downloaded in English, French and Spanish. A source template is also available to adapt the infographics in other languages. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is an umbrella organization of over 230 national diabetes associations in 170 countries and territories. It represents the interests of the growing number of people with diabetes and those at risk. The Federation has been leading the global diabetes community since 1950. We are pleased to announce that the theme of #WorldDiabetesDay 2018 and 2019 is The Family and Diabetes. Stay tun Today is another blue Friday! Wear blue & take a selfie with the blue circle to raise #diabetes awareness. Downloa Today is #WorldKidneyDay . Improve your understanding of diabetic kidney disease through IDFs free online course fo Continue reading >>

Home :: Washington State Diabetes Connection

Home :: Washington State Diabetes Connection

Mach is National Kidney Month! Learn to prevent kidney disease and its causes - diabetes and high blood pressure. Alert Day - March 27 - is an opportunity to sound the alarm about the prevalence of prediabetes by asking everyone to take the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test. View an infographic of diabetes in Washington. Congratulations to the 7 DPPs in WA that have earned recognition through the DPRP! Learn more about the new blood pressure guidelines from the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology. Learn more about the work of the Diabetes Network Leadership Team. 2018 Million Hearts Hypertension Control Challenge Over the past 5 years, weve seen tremendous progress among health systems and health professionals helping patients manage high blood pressure by using innovative, evidence-based tools and protocols. While these efforts are promising, we still have a long way to go: High blood pressure contributes to more than 1,100 deaths in the United States each day and puts millions at risk for heart disease and stroke. About 1 in 3 American adults75 million peoplehas high blood pressure, and nearly half of them dont have it under control. One in 6 adults with high blood pressure isnt even aware they have it, despite having health care coverage, being treated with medicine, and seeing their doctor regularly. CDCs Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention and the Million Hearts initiative are pleased to announce that the 2018 Million Hearts Hypertension Control Challenge is now open to receive applications from health professionals, practices, and health systems that show excellence in achieving hypertension control rates of 80 percent or greater over a 12-month period. For more information, check out the Events Page . On November 13th, 2017, the Am Continue reading >>

Press & Social Media

Press & Social Media

Press & Social Media To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: A Snapshot: Diabetes In The United States Error processing SSI file Continue reading >>

Dedicated To Diabetes

Dedicated To Diabetes

How Johns Hopkins Diabetes Center offers the latest treatments to help patients Diabetes isa chronic disease, and it can require a lotof time, effort and perseverance on the part of ourpatients, explains diabetes treatment specialistSudipa Sarkar, M.D. This is precisely what the Johns Hopkins Diabetes Center offers peoplewho have been diagnosed with diabetes help with what can be an overwhelmingchange in daily life. Below, Dr. Sarkar talks more about diabetesand what makes treatment at the DiabetesCenter uniquely comprehensive. Diabetes is a disease that results from either acomplete lack of insulin or a decreased abilityto make insulin. What is the difference betweentype 1 and type 2 diabetes? People with type 1 diabetes do not make insulin.People with type 2 diabetes usually do notmake enough insulin. What are the most commonstruggles people have withmanaging diabetes? From a broad perspective, socioeconomicfactors can affect a persons ability to gainaccess to care and treatment of diabetes.Another struggle patients have shared withme during treatment is feeling embarrassedto check their blood sugar or inject insulinin front of friends or at a social event.These are real struggles and can have a hugeeffect on the management of the disease, soits important to acknowledge them. Why was the Johns HopkinsDiabetes Center created and whatmakes it a unique place for thetreatment of diabetes? The Diabetes Center was created to address aneed in the community for dedicated diabetescare, in particular for those who may not completely understand their condition and why continuedtreatment is so important. Were focusedon the care of diabetes and the prevention ofdiabetes-related complications, such as heart and kidney disease , as well as providing quality diabeteseducation to our Continue reading >>

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the 2017 Diabetes Statistics Report with estimates for “prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs.” Where are we now? There are 30.3 million people with diabetes (9.4% of the US population) including 23.1 million people who are diagnosed and 7.2 million people (23.8%) undiagnosed. The numbers for prediabetes indicate that 84.1 million adults (33.9% of the adult U.S. population) have prediabetes, including 23.1 million adults aged 65 years or older (the age group with highest rate). The estimated percentage of individuals with type 1 diabetes remains at 5% among those with diabetes. The statistics are also provided by age, gender, ethnicity, and for each state/territory so you can search for these specifics. The CDC has produced wonderful infographics, “A Snapshot of Diabetes in the U.S.” and “Prediabes: Could it be You?” for everyone to use and reproduce. They illustrate estimates for diabetes, prediabetes, the cost of diabetes (dollars, risk of death, medical costs), specifics about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and a “What You Can Do” section. If we compare the numbers with previous estimates, we see that there has been an increase in those with diabetes and a decrease in those with prediabetes. However, the numbers are all still extremely high, and the costs and health burdens are staggering! What can we do with these statistics? Use them to help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes in the U.S. Share the positive messages regarding prevention strategies with those at risk of developing or with type 2 diabetes Distribute the information to local media and Continue reading >>

Oral Health And Diabetes Correlation & Infographic | Birch Dental Group

Oral Health And Diabetes Correlation & Infographic | Birch Dental Group

The key to a healthy mouth and a healthy body is the attention you give your pearly whites. Realizing real world statistics of Canadians oral health and the correlation to diabetes is a real eye opener. But theres hope. This infographic brought to you by Birch Dental Group highlights the percentage of Canadians suffering from poor oral health as well tips on how to prevent certain dental problems that could lead to diabetes. Please include attribution to with this graphic. Mostly everyone we know has a dental cavity, and this infographic reveals that a whopping 96% of Canadian adults have dental cavities , with a quarter of Canadians not being regulars for dentist appointments. Theres even a fun fact thrown in which will leave you speechless just imagine, there are more bacteria in your mouth than the Earths entire population! However, you can prevent certain dental problems from arising by watching what you eat. Your diet is a huge contributor to how your bodys health is, and watching what you put in it will help save you additional trips to the dentist. Acidic drinks like sodas and lemon water can cause havoc to your teeths enamel, slowly eroding it away due to the high phosphorus content and acidic content. These energy drinks may also have a high sugar content, which may play havoc with your blood sugar levels, which in turn could affect the nerve endings in your body. Thinking this is not so serious? When your nerve endings are damaged, your gums are starved of oxygen, and our body needs oxygen to stay healthy. Gums deprived of oxygen will face more damage, leading to a higher chance of infections. If you have irregular blood sugar level, you can control this with regular exercise and a healthy diet. Smokers have a higher chance of getting gum dis Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017

World Diabetes Day 2017

ISA stands by women with diabetes in supporting their right to a healthy future ISA contributes to IDFs activities on World Diabetes Day with an online campaign themed Do it for you Being keenly aware of the increasing rate of diabetes globally and of the importance to join our voice with the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in raising awareness about the need to prioritise diabetes management, the International Sweeteners Association (ISA) proudly supports World Diabetes Day (WDD) on 14th November for yet another year by developing an engaging online activity programme with the scientific support of the European Specialist Dietetic Network for Diabetes of the European Federation of the Associations of Dietitians (EFAD). With women being at the heart of World Diabetes Day this year, themed as Women and diabetes Our right to a healthy future, the aim of the ISA online activities is to encourage women to make their diabetes management one of their core priorities among other important and never-ending womens tasks and daily activities. Therefore, by developing engaging online materials such as an animated video and infographics, we would like to urge women to Do it for you, because the better women get their diabetes under control, the better theyll feel and the better theyll be able to keep up with everything else in that endlessly busy, but rewarding thing called life. Do it for You: An ISA online activity programme in support of WDD 2017 The core of the ISA integrated online programme for World Diabetes Day this year, under the umbrella theme Do it for You, consists of an inspirational animated video and an engaging infographic, which aim to help raise awareness among women that managing diabetes might sound scary at first but it can be easier than women might Continue reading >>

Diabetes Guidelines: This Infographic Is Like The 10 Commandments Of Diabetes | Reader's Digest

Diabetes Guidelines: This Infographic Is Like The 10 Commandments Of Diabetes | Reader's Digest

This Infographic Is Like the 10 Commandments of Diabetes Get a print subscription to Reader's Digest and instantly enjoy free digital access on any device. A diagnosis of diabetes doesn't mean the end to a full, active, and happy life. But there are some golden rules to always follow. Science is increasingly uncovering new ways toreversediabetes , achronic condition that affects the way the body processes blood sugar, and which has more than doubled in prevalence over the past 20 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Scientists arealso increasingly aware of whos most at risk for the disease: According to a new study looking at the demographics of diabetes in this country, the highest risk can be found among racial and ethnic minorities, people with low incomes or lower educational levels, and people living in rural areas. In one scary finding, the research, which was published in theInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health,showedthat across the country, women with diabetes were at a higher risk of foregoing medical care. Ifyoure among the more than 29 million Americans or 8.5percent of the global population withthe disease, you absolutely can live a healthy, happy lifeif you take care of yourself and follow certain diabetes guidelines. Whether youve just been diagnosed or have been managing the disease your whole life, this handy infographic from Vitality spells out the absolute must-dos for optimum diabetes care. Follow it exactly tominimize diabetes complications and achieveyour best quality oflife. And dont miss these simple tricks for living well with diabetes from people who have it. Courtesy Tips for Living Well from Vitality Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017 Theme Announced: Woman & Diabetes

World Diabetes Day 2017 Theme Announced: Woman & Diabetes

The theme of World Diabetes Day (WDD) 2017 - 14 November - is Women and Diabetes, with the slogan "Our right to a healthy future". Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the campaign will promote the importance of affordable and equitable access for all women at risk for or living with diabetes to the essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information they require to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes and strengthen their capacity to prevent type 2 diabetes. There are currently over 199 million women living with diabetes and this total is projected to increase to 313 million by 2040. Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women globally, causing 2.1 million deaths each year. As a result of socioeconomic conditions, girls and women with diabetes experience barriers in accessing cost-effective diabetes prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment and care, particularly in developing countries. Two out of every five women with diabetes are of reproductive age, accounting for over 60 million women worldwide. Women with diabetes have more difficulty conceiving and may have poor pregnancy outcomes. Approximately one in seven births is affected by gestational diabetes (GDM), a severe and neglected threat to maternal and child health. A significant number of women with GDM also go on to develop type 2 diabetes resulting in further healthcare complications and costs. Women and girls must be empowered with equitable access to knowledge and resources that will strengthen their capacity to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, and influence the adoption of healthy lifestyles to improve the health and well-being of those around them and future generations. The first set of promotional materials promoting the ke Continue reading >>

76% Of People With Type 2 Diabetes Feel Shame Around Their Diagnosis. Heres What We Can Do About It.

76% Of People With Type 2 Diabetes Feel Shame Around Their Diagnosis. Heres What We Can Do About It.

Over half (52%) of the adult population in the US is suffering from type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, and a new Virta survey shows that a staggering 76% of people with type 2 diabetes experience shame around their diagnosis. This National Diabetes Month, Virta took a closer look at what this shame feels like for patientsand gathered advice from clinicians on how people living with type 2 diabetes can shed these feelings. Diabetes isnt anyones fault, and its nothing to be ashamed of. Unfortunately, the majority of people (55%) with type 2 diabetes avoid talking about it.That breaks down into 39% of people with type 2 diabetes who avoid telling their friends, family, or employer about their conditionand 16% who havent told anyone at all. The situations where people feel shame are startlingly common. Here are the situations in which people with type 2 diabetes feel the most shame and embarrassment: Via: Virta Health This National Diabetes Month, lets practice empathy and compassion for people living with type 2 diabeteswhether thats for ourselves or for someone else. Learndipity Data Insights, on behalf of Virta Health, gathered data from 1,000 Americans around their opinions and experiences with Type 2 diabetes. To achieve a representative sample, Virtas survey was distributed to all 50 states, to subjects aged 14 to 54, across all genders, income levels, and marital and employment statuses. The survey has a margin of error of +/- 3 percent. The survey was conducted on September 14, 2017 via a survey platform that delivers and collects survey data via mobile phone. Continue reading >>

2017 Diabetes Facts & Statistics

2017 Diabetes Facts & Statistics

Diabetes costs the U.S. economy over $245 billion per year, making it the country’s most expensive disease. But the damage obviously extends well beyond dollars and cents. It’s the 3rd most deadly disease in the U.S., claiming over 80,000 lives per year and becoming a daily concern for millions more. Yet the roughly 9 in 10 Americans who don’t have diabetes probably don’t understand the full extent of the struggle, either. The same can also be said of the nearly 1 in 4 people with diabetes who don’t know they have it. So to help spread awareness, WalletHub assembled an interesting infographic exploring the impact of the disease as well as what folks are doing to fight back. We also surveyed a panel of diabetes experts about issues ranging from personal finance to policy. You can find everything below. Ask The Experts: Dealing With & Defeating Diabetes For insights into how we can reduce the many costs of diabetes, WalletHub posed the following questions to a panel of experts. You can check out their bios and responses below. What are the warning signs that someone may have Type 1 Diabetes? What about Type 2? What steps can someone take today to help reduce diabetes risk? What should public officials do to raise awareness about diabetes and the need for screening? What are some common myths or misunderstandings people have about diabetes? How have individuals with diabetes fared under the Affordable Care Act? What tips do you have for a person with Type 2 diabetes looking to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle while on a budget? Continue reading >>

Welcome To Dfa Diabetes Week 2017

Welcome To Dfa Diabetes Week 2017

Welcome to DFA’s National Diabetes Week! National Diabetes Week 2017 kicks off today. Diabetic Foot Australia will highlight the growing burden of foot disease in people with diabetes throughout this week. DFA provides you with special updates that include the release of new information for our key stakeholders: patients, health professionals, researchers and industry. We’ve got a big week in store! Today we re-release our popular ‘Canberra’ infographic as a reminder of the scale & seriousness of the threat posed by Diabetic Foot Disease to the people of Australia. The infographic highlights some alarming statistics in light of recent Australian research: Total number of Australians with diabetic foot disease has increased from 300,000 to 380,000 people We now know that 4 people die daily as a result of diabetic foot disease Hospitalisations have increased hugely – previously there were 500-600 people in hospital each night, now nearly 1000 people are in hospital each night – which is the total capacity of Canberra’s hospitals We now know that the conservative cost of hospitalisations is approximately $1 million dollars PER DAY. Click HERE to download the updated infographic for free! To support our health professionals & researchers around the country we continue to drive our “What’s New in DFU” event series. These events offer the fantastic opportunity to learn more about the latest cutting edge research, treatments, technologies and practice in diabetic foot disease During Diabetes Week, DFA are delighted to also offer a 25% discount off our upcoming Queensland ‘What’s New’ Events. These events offer the fantastic opportunity to learn more about the latest cutting edge research, treatments, technologies and practice in diabetic foot disease. Continue reading >>

The Unrelenting Global March Of Diabetes

The Unrelenting Global March Of Diabetes

Diabetes is the world's eighth biggest killer, accounting for some 1.5 million deaths each year. A major new World Health Organization report has now revealed that the number of cases around the world has nearly quadrupled to 422 million in 2014 from 108 million in 1980. The Eastern-Mediterranean region had the biggest increase in cases during that time frame. Diabetes now affects one in 11 adults with high blood sugar levels linked to 3.8 million deaths every year. This chart shows the percentage prevalence and number of adults with diabetes by WHO region in 1980 and 2014. Download Chart URL to be used as reference link:HTML code to embed chart You will find more statistics at Statista Continue reading >>

More in diabetes