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Diabetes In Toddlers Warning Signs

Diabetes: A Lost Childhood

Diabetes: A Lost Childhood

On the day five years ago when my daughter Izzi, then aged 10, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, her seven-year-old brother Rowan was reluctant to visit her in the hospital. "Is she going to die?" he asked gravely. It was hard to reassure him through my tears, as I had only the vaguest idea of what type 1 diabetes was. I now know that, without insulin, which she will need to inject multiple times every day for the rest of her life, the answer would almost certainly have been yes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which insulin-producing cells in the pancreas just give up. No one knows why, and there is no cure. Izzi did nothing to cause this to happen and we have no family history of the condition, so, for us, there is no genetic link. She was just unlucky, like the 400,000 other people in the UK who have it. The condition is a life sentence: every organ in her body is under constant attack and the only defence is to pump herself full of insulin. We only realised something was wrong when Izzi started to drink large quantities of water. At first I was pleased: I had always thought she didn't drink enough. But when one day she forgot to take her water bottle to school and went into a massive panic, I began to suspect there was a problem. We later learned that the need to drink lots was a result of her body's attempt to flush out the excess sugar in her blood. Insulin is the hormone that acts as a key to unlock pathways between the blood and the body's cells, which need the sugar for energy. Without insulin, the concentration of sugar in the blood can build up to life-threatening levels. We were fortunate as our GP rushed Izzi straight to hospital. A quarter of the 2,000 children diagnosed annually with type 1 diabetes become seriously ill, and 10 die each ye Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children (cont.)

Type 2 Diabetes In Children (cont.)

A A A Symptoms Children often have no symptoms of type 2 diabetes before they are diagnosed, because their blood sugar level has been rising so slowly. As a result, a child may have diabetes for several months or years before being diagnosed. When children do have symptoms, the most common include: Slight increase in the frequency of urination. Your child may have started wetting the bed at night. Slight increase in thirst. Other possible symptoms include: Increased tiredness. Nausea. Blurred vision. Frequent infections and slow-healing wounds or sores. Weight loss. What Happens Type 2 diabetes usually develops in adulthood, but the number of children being diagnosed with the disease is rising. Children with type 2 diabetes are usually diagnosed during the early teen years. During this time, their bodies are growing and developing rapidly, placing a demand on the pancreas to produce additional insulin. The hormones released during puberty can make it harder than usual for the body to use insulin correctly (insulin resistance). Also, children with type 2 diabetes are usually overweight, which also contributes to insulin resistance. If the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to overcome the resistance, diabetes can develop. Diabetes experts believe the disease progresses as it does in adults. The main risk factors for complications from diabetes are the length of time a person has diabetes and the degree of blood sugar control. A child who develops type 2 diabetes may have an increased risk of complications, because he or she will have the disease for a long time. Some complications that children and teens may develop include: Eye disease (diabetic retinopathy) and kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy). High blood pressure or high cholesterol, which increases the risk Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children: Factsheet

Diabetes In Children: Factsheet

What is it? Diabetes is a condition characterised by the increased levels of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. The hormone Insulin usually moves the glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. However, if the body cannot make adequate amounts of Insulin or it does not perform its function properly, the glucose is not moved, hence resulting in higher levels of this type of sugar in the blood. The impact of high glucose levels in the blood can affect both short term and long term health. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes: This type is an autoimmune condition as the body works against the production of Insulin by destroying pancreatic cells that create it. This leaves little or no Insulin for the body to ensure proper transport of glucose to the different cells. 2. Type 2 diabetes: This type of diabetes is a result of insufficient levels of Insulin in the body or due to the impaired functioning of the hormone. Is it common? Type 1 diabetes is more common in children and young adults. One in ten Australians with diabetes have this type, pushing Australia’s rates to one of the highest in the world. Type 2 diabetes was less commonly observed in children, however recently, Diabetes Australia reports that this type is also being observed in the younger generation, with the rise of obesity and other lifestyle habits. What are the causes? The exact cause of Type 1 diabetes is still being researched, however, the presence of certain genes can predispose the child to develop the condition. Other causes include viral infections which could act like a trigger, making the immune system attack the Insulin producing pancreatic cells. Type 2 diabetes in children is largely thought to occur due to lifestyle habits. Being overweight or obese can mea Continue reading >>

Signs Of Juvenile Diabetes Watch For These Warning Signs

Signs Of Juvenile Diabetes Watch For These Warning Signs

Signs of Juvenile Diabetes Watch for These Warning Signs The signs of juvenile diabetes are very important to recognize. They can present in different ways in different children; however, there are some key warning signs that should prompt immediate attention from medical professionals. Before listing the signs of juvenile diabetes, it is necessary to distinguish between the two types. Years ago the term juvenile diabetes was synonymous with type 1 diabetes, a condition in which the body stops producing insulin. However, in recent years there has been a steep increasing in the number of cases of type 2 diabetes in children. In juvenile diabetes type 2 , insulin is still being produced however, the amount may be too little or the body may no longer react properly to the insulin. Type 1 diabetes is thought to be linked to an autoimmune disease that destroys the beta cells of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is thought to be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight, inactive and eating a poor nutritional diet. Signs of type 1 juvenile diabetes may come on suddenly and may include: Sensations of tingling or numbness in the feet Some children may also experience, a fruity or sweet smell to their breath, heavy or labored breathing and or vision changes. Because this condition can develop in very young children, even toddlers, it is important for parents to recognize the signs and symptoms of juvenile diabetes. "Education about the symptoms of type 1 diabetes is critical because type 1 can easily be mistaken for more common illnesses, such as the flu" (1). Type 2 diabetes can present with many of the same signs as type 1; however, type 2 juvenile diabetes signs and symptoms tend to develop more gradually over time. This can make the warning signs harder to identify. Continue reading >>

How To Know When A Childs Flu Turns Serious

How To Know When A Childs Flu Turns Serious

Well |How to Know When a Childs Flu Turns Serious Ethan Lasorsa, 12, of Macungie, Pa., was treated for flu and an ear infection in the pediatric ward at Lehigh Valley Hospital-Cedar Crest in Allentown, Pa. Credit Joshua Bright for The New York Times The standard prescription for flu is to stay home and rest, drink plenty of fluids, and keep pain and fever under control with over-the-counter drugs like acetaminophen. But this flu season has been a particularly scary one for parents. At least 53 children across the country have died from flu-related illness, and parents need to know how to tell if a child takes a turn for the worse and if its time to rush to the hospital. Its not an easy question to answer, experts say. Every once in a while, even among healthy children, this influenza strain and others can make a person very, very sick, really fast, said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Its deceptive. Most parents know they need to closely monitor children under 5 for any signs their illness is getting more severe. Its important to pay even closer attention to babies and toddlers under 2, making sure they are getting enough liquids because they can easily become dehydrated. Emergency Warning Signs in Children With Flu The following symptoms in children with the flu call for immediate medical care, according to the C.D.C. And while the vast majority of otherwise healthy children will ride out a bout of influenza and recover rather quickly, a small number will develop potentially life-threatening complications that require immediate medical attention, Dr. Schaffner said. But half of the children hospitalized with influenza this flu season did not have any of the underlying chronic conditions that make chi Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatment

High Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatment

High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, occurs when the body has too much food or glucose, or too little insulin. Potential reasons a person with type 1 diabetes (T1D) might have high blood sugar include: Not enough insulin taken Eating more than usual Eating earlier than usual Eating food with higher glucose content without injecting extra insulin Injecting insulin at a site on the body where the absorption rate is slower Missing or skipping an insulin dose A clog in insulin pump tubing Less exercise than normal Emotional or physical stress Illness or injury Other hormones Medications (such as steroids) Pain Hyperglycemia Symptoms Thirst (dehydration) Frequent urination, including potential waking up in the middle of the night to urinate; and unusually wet diapers in an infant or toddler. Blurry vision Stomach pain Increased hunger Nausea Drowsiness, lethargy, exhaustion Confusion Sweating Fruity, sweet or wine-like odor on breath Vomiting Inability to concentrate Weight loss (a longer-term symptom) that eventually leads to coma Treatments The following recommendations are general treatments for high blood sugar. Specific actions, such as giving additional insulin, should be determined by the adult with T1D, physician or parents (for a child). If blood test results are slightly above normal: Continue regular activity Drink water or sugar-free drinks Monitor blood-sugar levels by checking regularly Chart blood-glucose test results Consider injecting additional insulin as instructed by physician or parent If blood test results are moderately high: Don’t engage in strenuous exercise Drink water or sugar-free drinks Inject additional insulin if instructed by physician or parents Monitor blood-sugar levels by checking regularly Chart blood-glucose test results Try to discover Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Know The Signs

Know The Signs

Do you know the signs of type 1 diabetes? The most dangerous time in the life of a diabetic child is prior to diagnosis when the symptoms are often confused with the flu. Tragically, children sometimes die or become brain damaged by the time anyone realizes that they have diabetes. Even doctors can miss that a child has diabetes until it’s too late. Learn the warning signs. Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic illnesses of children. The majority–90%–of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have no family history, so all parents and healthcare providers need to recognize the symptoms. Every year, the number of children getting diabetes goes up. No one knows why. If you see any of these signs and symptoms in your child, see your healthcare provider and make sure that your child is tested for type 1 diabetes. If your child is showing signs of DKA (see symptoms below), go to the ER immediately. There is no time to waste. At this stage, children are often transported by ambulance or helicopter and sometimes are placed on life support. Let’s not lose one more child to this disease due to a missed diagnosis. Let the memory of Mary Kathryn and the tragic loss of this 8 year old girl help save another child’s life. See the International Diabetes Federation’s World Diabetes Day Web page and their campaign, A Life for a Child. No child should die of diabetes. Signs of Type 1 Diabetes •Excessive thirst—may be overlooked in warm weather. •Frequent urination—toilet-trained children often begin wetting the bed or getting up during the night to urinate. Babies can soak through diapers. •Loss of weight—often the most noticeable symptom. Any weight loss should be evaluated by a doctor. •Fruity-smelling breath or acetone-smelling breath—sign that Continue reading >>

My Daughter Has Type 1 Diabetes And We Almost Missed All The Symptoms

My Daughter Has Type 1 Diabetes And We Almost Missed All The Symptoms

Editor’s note: This post is not intended as medical advice. Always consult a medical professional or physician before treatment of any kind. The strange vomiting started during another overcast day in Sweden. With three kids, I had weathered plenty of stomach viruses. But something was different this time. My two-year-old daughter was smiling and laughing two seconds earlier, but what she threw up looks like a fully formed marshmallow, and her breath smells like cantaloupe. Could this be some rare virus unique to Scandinavia? Surely, if there were such a thing, I would have heard about it from one of the mothers in our community of ex-pats. I have been known to overreact when it comes to my children’s health. “Waiting it out” is not in my vocabulary. Why then am I not rushing to the emergency room? Maybe I’m skeptical about what kind of care we’ll get under socialized medicine. Or maybe I know deep down that this time it isn’t my overactive imagination but a potentially serious illness. I am paralyzed by my own thoughts: Will the hospital staff speak English? Will I be waiting for hours only to be told to go home and give her Pedialyte? Do they even have Pedialyte in Sweden? My mother calls long distance from the States. Since she has long functioned as my “personal trainer” in irrational anxiety, I try to hide the truth from her. “What’s wrong with Alana?” she asks, panic rippling through her voice. “It’s nothing. She just threw up some milk.” “What’s going on? Is she okay?” She’s escalating. “It’s not so bad,” I hear myself lie. “It smells kind of sweet.” “What did she eat? Does she have a fever? Was she exposed to any other sick kids? I knew you shouldn’t move over there. Do you even have a doctor you can call? What Continue reading >>

What Are 5 Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Toddlers?

What Are 5 Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Toddlers?

What Are 5 Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Toddlers? There he is, as listless as a sloth. Your once bouncing off the walls toddler who had you pulling out your hair is now making you pull out your hair for another reason: you cant figure out whats wrong with him. You thought it was the flu, but this has been going on for weeks. You consider the fact that your time-strapped schedule has thrown you off your dietary game, but hes devouring fruits and veggies faster than you can chop em. Yup. Though both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (Im not the only one who heard diabeetus, right?If you dont know what Im talking about, click here) are typically associated with people over the age of 20, even babies can have diabetes. Let us throw some stats your way, compliments of the American Diabetes Association: 29.1 million Americans (adults and kids included) had diabetes symptoms in 2012. This accounts for 9.3% of the population 1.25 million Americans (again, adults and kids) had type 1 diabetes Around 208,000 Americans who are under the age of 20 are believe to have diagnosed diabetes (thats about 0.25% of that population) 18,436 youth were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes between 2008 and 2009 5,089 youth were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 2008 and 2009 What Happens When Diabetes Is Left Untreated? Diabetes may be common, but that doesnt mean that your toddler should not be checked and treated ASAP. Do not assume that because your little bubsy is still young enough that his health wont be negatively affected because you couldnt get out of the house and take him to a doctor. Kidney disease is probably the most prevalent diabetes-related health issues toddlers face. In 2011, 228,924 people of all ages who had kidney failure due to diabetes were living with either a kidney tra Continue reading >>

Children & Type 1 Diabetes

Children & Type 1 Diabetes

When a child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, the role of a caregiver becomes more important than ever. Family life and daily routines may seem more complicated in the beginning. Over time, and with the support of your diabetes team, this will change. You will discover that your child can have a healthy and fulfilling life with diabetes. Caring for a child with diabetes Testing blood glucose (sugar) and giving insulin may seem overwhelming in the beginning. As you work with your diabetes team you will learn about diabetes and become more confident. It is important that you become comfortable with caring for your child’s diabetes so that you can help your child become comfortable too. As the caregiver of a child with type 1 diabetes, you will help them with: Monitoring blood glucose Administering insulin Having regular meals and snacks Balancing food, medication and physical activity Recognizing the signs of low and high blood glucose Talking to your child about diabetes The way you talk to your child about diabetes will have a big impact on how they perceive their diabetes and themself. Being positive and supportive will help boost your child’s self-esteem. Talk to your child about how foods fit into a healthy lifestyle. For example, no single food should be described as “bad” or “junk.” Describe blood glucose levels as “in target,” “high,” or “low.” Try to avoid describing blood glucose levels as “good” or “bad.” Remember that diabetes is only one part of a child’s life. Talk to you child about other important things that are happening in their life such as school, sports and social events. Involving other caregivers It is important that other caregivers understand your child’s diabetes and know how to care for them. Members of you Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes develops gradually, but the symptoms may seem to come on suddenly. If you notice that you or your child have several of the symptoms listed below, make an appointment to see the doctor. Here’s why symptoms seem to develop suddenly: something triggers the development of type 1 diabetes (researchers think it’s a viral infection—read this article on what causes type 1 diabetes, and the body loses its ability to make insulin. However, at that point, there’s still insulin in the body so glucose levels are still normal. Over time, a decreasing amount of insulin is made in the body, but that can take years. When there’s no more insulin in the body, blood glucose levels rise quickly, and these symptoms can rapidly develop: Extreme weakness and/or tiredness Extreme thirst—dehydration Increased urination Abdominal pain Nausea and/or vomiting Blurry vision Wounds that don’t heal well Irritability or quick mood changes Changes to (or loss of) menstruation There are also signs of type 1 diabetes. Signs are different from symptoms in that they can be measured objectively; symptoms are experienced and reported by the patient. Signs of type 1 diabetes include: Weight loss—despite eating more Rapid heart rate Reduced blood pressure (falling below 90/60) Low body temperature (below 97º F) There is an overall lack of public awareness of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Making yourself aware of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes is a great way to be proactive about your health and the health of your family members. If you notice any of these signs or symptoms, it’s possible that you have (or your child has) type 1 diabetes. A doctor can make that diagnosis by checking blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Acute Emergencies Of Diabetes

Acute Emergencies Of Diabetes

Hypoglycemia: Low Blood Sugar (Insulin Reaction) Warning signs and symptoms of low blood sugar (insulin reaction) happen suddenly. Signs and symptoms can easily be mistaken for misbehavior. The child may not recognize symptoms developing. Severity of a low blood sugar reaction progresses from mild to severe. Severe reactions are preventable by early detection and treatment of low blood sugars. Be familiar with identification and treatment of low blood sugar to avert an emergency situation. Blood sugar can go to low if the child with diabetes has: taken too much insulin not eaten enough food had extra exercise without extra food Mild Hypoglycemia Signs and Symptoms Treatment Behavioral Signs: A wide variety of behaviors can occur. Behavior changes may include: acting quiet and withdrawn being stubborn or restless tantrums of sudden rage confusion inappropriate emotional responses (eg: laughter, crying) poor concentration or day dreaming Shakiness Sweatiness Headache Dizziness Pallor Increased Heart Rate NOTE: It may take the child several hours to recover following a low blood sugar episode. The student should not be expected to perform at optimal levels, but having diabetes should never be an excuse for poor overall school If you don't know what the blood sugar is, treat the symptoms. Never send a child who you suspect is having a low blood sugar to the nurse's office. Send another student to get help if you need it. Give the child some quick-acting sugar such as: 3 - 4 ounces of juice 6 - 8 ounces of REGULAR pop 2 - 4 glucose tablets 5 - 6 lifesavers 6 - 8 ounces Milk Check the blood sugar 20 -30 minutes after treatment. If the blood sugar result is less than 80, or if the child still has symptoms, repeat the quick sugar treatment and blood sugar testing cycle until th Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

6 Warning Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

6 Warning Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and Type 1 Diabetes is the most common type of diabetes in children and adolescents. Being able to identify the signs and symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes, a condition in whichthe body does not produce insulin, can lead to swift diagnosis and prevent possible complications. If you suspect your child has any of the below symptoms, please seek care immediately or contact your primary care provider with questions. Polyuria: This is a fancy medical term for frequent urination. You may notice some changes such as getting up frequently in the night to urinate, or bedwetting in children who were previously potty-trained. In infants and toddlers, you may notice more wet diapers or pull-ups, or a sugary smell when you change the diaper. Polydipsia: This is another fancy medical term that means increased/frequent thirst. Most kids will have an unquenchable thirst. You may notice they are always drinking, more than usual, or complaining of dry mouth. Polyphagia: Fancy term for frequent hunger. Some kids will seem to have an appetite that cannot be satisfied; however they are not gaining weight. Weight loss: You may notice minimal to extreme weight loss, even though they are eating more. Fatigue: You may notice your child is sleeping more, or is taking naps when they were no longer the age where taking naps would be normal. Sometimes they will lose interest in playing with friends or participating in sports due to being tired. Fruity breath: You may notice a fruity, chemical smell to your childs breath. These symptoms, especially the first three, are generally seen in combination with each other; however some kids may have one that stands out more than the others. Later symptoms could include heavy breathing with no known cause and decreased level o Continue reading >>

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