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Diabetes In The Philippines

The Diabetes Store - Home | Facebook

The Diabetes Store - Home | Facebook

4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves (1 to 1-1/4 pounds total) 1. In small bowl combine olive oil and paprika. Brush corn and chicken with oil mixture. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. 2. For a charcoal grill, place corn and chicken on rack directly over medium coals. Grill, uncovered, for 12 to 15 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink (170 degrees F), turning once. (For a gas grill, preheat grill. Reduce heat to medium. Place corn and chicken on grill rack over heat. Cover and grill as above.) 3. On a cutting board, place an ear of corn, pointed tip down. While holding corn firmly at stem end to keep in place, use a sharp knife to cut corn from cob, leaving some corn in planks; rotate cob as needed to cut corn from all sides. Repeat with remaining ears. (Use a kitchen towel to grip, if necessary.) 4. Transfer corn to bowl; stir in sour cream. Stir in milk to desired creaminess. Slice chicken breasts. Serve with corn and sprinkle with shredded basil. Makes 4 (1 breast half and 1/3 cup corn mixture each) servings Serving Size: 1 breast half and 1/3 cup corn mixture Continue reading >>

Three Major Types Of Diabetes | Medicard Philippines

Three Major Types Of Diabetes | Medicard Philippines

In the Philippines, diabetes incidence has posted an alarming increase, with health experts predicting that by 2030, there will be 6.16 million Filipinos suffering from the disease. Addressing the problem begins with extensive efforts to educate the public about diabetes its signs and symptoms, types, causes, prevention, and management, explains Dr. Nicky Montoya, president of MediCard, a leading Philippine HMO. He adds, A lot of people, for example, understand diabetes simply as sugar intolerance and that if it doesnt run in your family, youre safe. But in fact, it comes in different types, some of which you can develop late in life. Below are three major types of diabetes and their characteristics. Type 1 diabetes. Previously called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and juvenile diabetes, Type 1 diabetes is known to develop most often among the young. It is an autoimmune disease that attacks cells of the pancreas, which then produces very little insulin, or none at all. People with this condition need to use insulin injection or pump to control their sugar levels. Its symptoms include increased urination, excessive thirst, fatigue, weight fluctuations, blurred vision, and slow-healing wounds. Type 2 diabetes. In Type 2 diabetes, the cells resist the effects of insulin. As the disease progresses, the body may eventually fail to produce enough insulin to regulate the blood sugar level. Type 2 diabetes exhibits the same symptoms as Type 1s, but these typically appear during adulthood, especially as a result of obesity, and physical inactivity. Because of this, prevention and treatment focus on promoting a healthy lifestyle. Gestational diabetes. This type of diabetes occurs if the body is unable to produce extra insulin to counter the resistance from hormones r Continue reading >>

Review Diabetes Care In The Philippines

Review Diabetes Care In The Philippines

Abstract Diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in Asian countries including the Philippines. Both the prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) continue to increase with a commensurate upward trend in the prevalence of prediabetes. The aim of this study was to review the prevalence of diabetes in the Philippines and to describe extensively the characteristics of diabetes care in the Philippines from availability of diagnostics tests to the procurement of medications. A literature search was performed using the search words diabetes care and Philippines. Articles that were retrieved were reviewed for relevance and then synthesized to highlight key features. The prevalence of diabetes in the Philippines is increasing. Rapid urbanization with increasing dependence on electronic gadgets and sedentary lifestyle contribute significantly to this epidemic. Diabetes care in the Philippines is disadvantaged and challenged with respect to resources, government support, and economics. The national insurance system does not cover comprehensive diabetes care in a preventive model and private insurance companies only offer limited diabetes coverage. Thus, most patients rely on “out-of-pocket” expenses, namely, laboratory procedures and daily medications. Consequently, poor pharmacotherapy adherence impairs prevention of complications. Moreover, behavioral modifications are difficult due to cultural preferences for a traditional diet of refined sugar, including white rice and bread. Translating clinical data into practice in the Philippines will require fundamental and transformative changes that increase diabetes awareness, emphasize lifestyle change while respecting cultural preferences, and promote public policy especially regarding the health insurance system to im Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care In The Philippines

Diabetes Care In The Philippines

BACKGROUND Diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in Asian countries including the Philip- pines. Both the prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) continue to increase with a com- mensurate upward trend in the prevalence of prediabetes. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to review the prevalence of diabetes in the Philippines and to describe extensively the characteristics of diabetes care in the Philippines from availability of diag- nostics tests to the procurement of medications. METHODS A literature search was performed using the search words diabetes care and Philippines. Articles that were retrieved were reviewed for relevance and then synthesized to highlight key features. FINDINGS The prevalence of diabetes in the Philippines is increasing. Rapid urbanization with increasing dependence on electronic gadgets and sedentary lifestyle contribute signicantly to this epidemic. Diabetes care in the Philippines is disadvantaged and challenged with respect to resources, government support, and economics. The national insurance system does not cover comprehensive diabetes care in a preventive model and private insurance companies only offer limited diabetes cov- erage. Thus, most patients rely on out-of-pocketexpenses, namely, laboratory procedures and daily medications. Consequently, poor pharmacotherapy adherence impairs prevention of complications. Moreover, behavioral modications are difcult due to cultural preferences for a traditional diet of rened sugar, including white rice and bread. CONCLUSIONS Translating clinical data into practice in the Philippines will require fundamental and transformative changes that increase diabetes awareness, emphasize lifestyle change while respecting cultural preferences, and promote public policy especially regardi Continue reading >>

Philippines Seen As Diabetes Hotspot

Philippines Seen As Diabetes Hotspot

WITH an estimated 7.3 million persons with diabetes, the Philippines is now being seen as a diabetes hotspot, according to the Philippine Society of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism (PSEDM). In an interview during the launch of The Diabetes Store (TDS), PSEDM fellow Dr. Ma. Cecille Anonuevo-Cruz said the growing prevalence rate of diabetes in the country makes it a hotspot. It is alarming because of the fact that we may not be in the Top 10, but we are in the Top 15. We are poised to be in the Top 10 if we don't change the way our diabetes is increasing here in the Philippines, said Cruz. She cited the changing lifestyle among Filipinos as among the main reasons for the growing number of people with diabetes. From having a carbohydrate-based diet, Cruz noted how Filipinos are now fonder of eating processed food. Now, we are seeing more and more processed food. That's probably one way of really increasing caloric intake as well. It is because its more convenient because of this different lifestyle we are adopting, said Cruz. She also pointed at having fewer Filipinos walking on a regular basis while resorting to smoking, drinking, and more eating, especially those working at night. Aside from the changing lifestyle, the PSEDM fellow also pointed at the threat brought by diabetes being hereditary. There are certain ethnicities of origin that would also have an increased risk of having diabetes... We have genetic predisposition for it, said Cruz. Records show that there an estimated 7.3 million Filipinos with diabetes, including 3.5 million diagnosed cases, and some 3.8 million that are undiagnosed. According to the World Health Organization, diabetes is one of the four major non-communicable diseases that cause deaths worldwide, with the others being cancer, heart Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Philippines

Diabetes Mellitus In Philippines

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The Prevalence Of Diabetes In The Philippines - Charantia

The Prevalence Of Diabetes In The Philippines - Charantia

The Prevalence of Diabetes in the Philippines is Alarming. Dr. Danilo Baldemor, past president of the Philippine Association of Diabetes Educators, revealed that as of 2012, 9.7% of adult Filipinos had Diabetes while 12.5% are at risk of diabetes. And figures from the DOH National Epidemiology Center show that for the period 1999 to 2005, the number of deaths due to Diabetes grew the fastest among all diseases from 9,749 in 1999 to 18,441 in 2005. Diabetes is a chronic disease which has no cure yet, but can be controlled by a diabetic regimen that starts with a regular blood sugar monitoring and an integrated Diet therapy that includes nutritional supplements, regular physical exercise and medication. And as Ampalaya has long been known to be helpful to diabetics, it has attracted a lot of attention as to its real value in the diet of Diabetics. The Prevalence of Diabetes in the Philippines is Alarming. Dr. Danilo Baldemor, past president of the Philippine Association of Diabetes Educators, revealed that as of 2012, 9.7% of adult Filipinos had Diabetes while 12.5% are at risk of diabetes. And figures from the DOH National Epidemiology Center show that for the period 1999 to 2005, the number of deaths due to Diabetes grew the fastest among all diseases from 9,749 in 1999 to 18,441 in 2005. Diabetes is a chronic disease which has no cure yet, but can be controlled by a diabetic regimen that starts with a regular blood sugar monitoring and an integrated Diet therapy that includes nutritional supplements, regular physical exercise and medication. And as Ampalaya has long been known to be helpful to diabetics, it has attracted a lot of attention as to its real value in the diet of Diabetics. Continue reading >>

Philippines Seen As Diabetes Hotspot

Philippines Seen As Diabetes Hotspot

Philippines seen as diabetes hotspot | SunStar Home / Manila / Local News / Philippines seen as diabetes hotspot WITH an estimated 7.3 million persons with diabetes, the Philippines is now being seen as a diabetes hotspot, according to the Philippine Society of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism (PSEDM). In an interview during the launch of The Diabetes Store (TDS), PSEDM fellow Dr. Ma. Cecille Anonuevo-Cruz said the growing prevalence rate of diabetes in the country makes it a hotspot. It is alarming because of the fact that we may not be in the Top 10, but we are in the Top 15. We are poised to be in the Top 10 if we don't change the way our diabetes is increasing here in the Philippines, said Cruz. She cited the changing lifestyle among Filipinos as among the main reasons for the growing number of people with diabetes. From having a carbohydrate-based diet, Cruz noted how Filipinos are now fonder of eating processed food. Now, we are seeing more and more processed food. That's probably one way of really increasing caloric intake as well. It is because its more convenient because of this different lifestyle we are adopting, said Cruz. She also pointed at having fewer Filipinos walking on a regular basis while resorting to smoking, drinking, and more eating, especially those working at night. Aside from the changing lifestyle, the PSEDM fellow also pointed at the threat brought by diabetes being hereditary. There are certain ethnicities of origin that would also have an increased risk of having diabetes... We have genetic predisposition for it, said Cruz. Records show that there an estimated 7.3 million Filipinos with diabetes, including 3.5 million diagnosed cases, and some 3.8 million that are undiagnosed. According to the World Health Organization, diabetes is Continue reading >>

Philippines

Philippines

The Philippines boasts the most beautiful scenery The Philippines boasts immense natural beauty such as the island of Boracay, Banaue Rice Terraces and Chocolate Hills. Tubbataha Reef is a fantastic excursion, while the Malacaang Palace is another sight worth seeing. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to south-west Mindanao and the Sulu archipelago, while all but essential travel is advised to the remainder of Mindanao. Around 122,759 British nationals visited the Philippines in 2013, which can only be accessed viably from the United Kingdom by airplane. Manila, the capital of the Philippines, can be reached from London by airplane in around 13 hours, but an average time is often between 16-18 hours. The Philippines is seven hours ahead of British Summer Time and eight hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time, which could require alterations to your diabetes management. If you are unsure about managing your diabetes medication in the Phillippines, you should discuss this with your diabetes team . The Philippines is an incredibly warm country, with average temperatures throughout the year standing at roughly 28C. Regardless of what time of year visiting, travellers taking insulin should vigilantly monitor their blood sugar levels as insulin absorption can be enhanced in warmer temperatures. The currency in The Philippines is the Philippines Peso. Most major credit and debit cards will be accepted by business establishments, but it is worth noting that some may have a minimum purchase requirement before accepting credit card payments. Money changers in the city offer better rates than those at the airport and hotels for those looking to exchange money after arriving in the Philippines. There are no mandatory vaccinations to enter the Philippine Continue reading >>

Diving With Diabetes In The Philippines

Diving With Diabetes In The Philippines

When I signed up to dive in the Philippines, I hemmed and hawed about whether or not to reveal that I had diabetes. Even though I was already certified, whether or not I could dive here would be up to the discretion of the local dive shops. So I made a decision: I lied about having diabetes. Well to be fair, I didnt exactly lie. I didnt say that I didnt have diabetes. I just didnt say that I did. I took comfort in the fact that I knew other people with diabetes who regularly dive and regularly dont reveal that they have the disease. Diabetics are generally not allowed to SCUBA dive from what Ive learned, its because it poses too much of a risk. There are too many unknowns: what happens if your blood sugar goes low on a dive? What if it goes too high? If you take almost any kind of prescription medication, you need a doctor to okay your dive. So I traveled to St. Thomas to get certified by Steve Prosterman, a T1D whos a certified SCUBA diver and also certifies others with T1D, in 2007. When we arrived at the first dive spot, my blood sugar was a little high, in the 200s mg/dL (11 mmol/L). I tested with my hands inside my bag, so no one could see the blood drip from my finger. I didnt correct because I still had insulin on board and we were about to swim for a bit. I disconnected my pump and stored it in my watertight bag, as if I was hiding contraband. We explored a shallow Japanese gunner ship that had sunk in the early 1900s. It was cool to see how it received a second life and now housed an underwater ecosystem. The second dive was INCREDIBLE!!! My favorite part was looking through the portholes, which were still intact. Barnacles and other marine life had made the ship their home. After around 40 minutes, we made our way up, doing a safety stop so as not to come up Continue reading >>

Welcome To Pda Online...

Welcome To Pda Online...

Election for the Diabetes Philippines Board of Directors for the Year 2017-2018 Nomination for candidates for the Diabetes Philippines Board of Director must be received at the Diabetes Philippines Office, Unit 25 Facilities Centre, #548 Shaw Blvd., Mandaluyong City in writing (hard copy) not later than 5:00 pm September 11, 2016 The full name of the nominee should be written in the nomination form. FOR DIABETES PHILIPPINES BOARD OF DIRECTORS Candidates for election to the Board of Directors must be active members of the Association in good standing: one must show of attendance in at least one specific session, workshop or annual convention of the association and attendance in the business meeting as well as payment of annual membership fee. Should be nominated by at least three (3) Diabetes Philippines members in good standing and approved by the Committee on Elections. Picture gallery of World Diabetes Day 2004 jump in Picture gallery of World Diabetes Day 2005 jump in Picture gallery of World Diabetes Day 2006 jump in Picture gallery of World Diabetes Day 2007 jump in Picture gallery of World Diabetes Day 2008 jump in Continue reading >>

The Philippines Is A Diabetes Hotspot

The Philippines Is A Diabetes Hotspot

Philippine Daily Inquirer / 05:10 AM January 09, 2018 The Philippines is considered one of the diabetes hot spots in the Western Pacific region, where the disease is already reaching epidemic proportions. Our government knows this too well, and the increased taxes on sugary drinks is just one of the steps being taken to stem the tide. Sufficient public education is needed to make everyone aware of the lifestyle changes needed to prevent diabetes, or to detect it earlier, so it can be controlled before there is serious damage to vital organs like the heart, kidneys, brain, eyes, nerves, liversince practically all organs and tissues of the body are affected. Were happy to learn that the Philippine Center for Diabetes Education Foundation, Inc. (PCDEF), founded and currently headed by Dr. Augusto Litonjua, was recognized as a Centre of Education by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and its School of Diabetes during its recent congress held in Abu Dhabi. Dr. Litonjua is considered the Father of Philippine Endocrinology for having pioneered in treating patients with diabetes and other endocrine or hormone-related problems in the country. The PCDEF, also known as the Diabetes Center Philippines, has been at the forefront of raising public awareness for diabetes in the Philippines for the past 25 years through its four major programsDiabetes Awareness Week, Camp Cope (for Type 1 diabetic children), Intensive Training Course for Diabetes Teams, and the National Assembly of Diabetes Educators. To date, it has established more than 200 training teams, based in major hospitals around the country. In the Western Pacific, the Philippines ranks fifthbehind China, Indonesia, Japan and Thailandin the number of diabetics. Based on the IDF Atlas, there were already 3.9 million Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care In The Philippines | Paz-pacheco | Journal Of The Asean Federation Of Endocrine Societies

Diabetes Care In The Philippines | Paz-pacheco | Journal Of The Asean Federation Of Endocrine Societies

Journal of the ASEAN Federation of Endocrine Societies University of the Philippines-Philippine General Hospital University of the Philippines-Philippine General Hospital Philippine Society of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Unviersity of the Philippines-Philippine General Hospital Taft Avenue, Ermita 1000 Manila, Philippines Received August 30, 2015. Accepted October 15, 2015. Published online first: November 30, 2015. The global burden of diabetes and its accompanying risk factors is upon us. Asia is the focus of this burden, owing to huge population numbers and increasing prevalence rates. The Philippines National Health and Nutrition Survey (NNHeS) of 2013, has provided the latest health and disease score with prevalence rates of the major risk factors among adults 20 years of age: diabetes (5.4%), hypertension (22.3%), dyslipidemia, low HDL (71.3%), obesity, BMI >25 kg/m2 (31.1%), and smoking (25.4%). Metabolic syndrome as of the 2008 survey reports a 27% prevalence rate (unpublished data). Efforts have to be directed to achieve improvement in prevention, survival, and quality of life for all diabetics. The health infrastructure under the leadership of the Department of Health, in partnership with governmental and non-governmental organizations has to provide a cohesive plan engaging all partners in various aspects of care. Strategies to enhance outcomes include: 1) a national screening program, 2) implementation of practice guidelines that will elevate the quality of care for all, 3) access to healthcare, medications, 4) development of an environment for research in institutions to allow a better understanding of these conditions among Filipino patients and 5) enhancement of training, education and service Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Diabetes

What You Need To Know About Diabetes

Actress and comedian Joy Viado is scheduled to undergo an operation at the Chinese General Hospital in a bid to save her foot from amputation due to diabetes complications. Diabetes is one of the world's most prevalent chronic diseases, with the numbers of those diagnosed with it steadily rising. In the Philippines, nearly one in 10 people are diabetic or prediabetic. But many people are still not informed enough about the disease and how to avoid it. Here's what you should know. Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when not enough insulin is produced by the pancreas, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin produced by the pancreas. A common result of this is raised blood sugar, which over time can lead to serious damage of the body's nervous and circulatory systems, among others. According to the World Health Organization, Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production. Type 2 diabetes, which usually develops in adulthood, is related to obesity, physical inactivity and unhealthy diets. It is characterized by the body's inability to effectively use the insulin produced by the pancreas. About 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide are Type 2 diabetes. A third type, known as gestational diabetes, is high blood sugar that occurs during pregnancy. Women with gestational diabetes are more at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in the future. They are also at risk of complications during pregnancy. 347 million people worldwide have diabetes more than 80% of these live in low- and middle-income countries In 2012 diabetes was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths diabetes deaths is expected to double from 2005 to 2030 diabetes is predicted to become the 7th leading cause of death in the world by the year 2030 cardiovascular disease is responsibl Continue reading >>

The Philippines Is Now A Diabetes Hotspot

The Philippines Is Now A Diabetes Hotspot

The Philippines is now a diabetes hotspot Simple ruleslike the Three As and proper platingcan help keep the disease in check Philippine Daily Inquirer / 03:00 AM March 29, 2016 Simple guidelines can help diabetics avoid the dire, costlier complications of their affliction. They just have to memorize fractions, small numbers, letters and hand gestures. One such example is the Three As. The rule lists general qualities in food and beverages that can compromise a diabetics health: apat ang paa, asin, asukal. It instructs diabetics to avoid meat from four-legged animals, and opt for chicken or fish. They should also cut back on salty and sweet items. Food is a major concern for people diagnosed with diabetes, said Dr. Danilo Baldemor at a press conference of The Diabetes Store (TDS)the countrys first one-stop-shop for diabetes-related matters. The first thing they would ask, Baldemor noted, is ano ang bawal? The Three As is a tough checklist, but its not a starvation diet. Baldemor clarified that diabetics can still consume pork or flavored drinks but only in moderation. They can still drink one can of soda per day or indulge in desserts sometimes, keeping in mind that abstinence is best to dodge more difficult complications. These complications include blindness and kidney failure, whose leading cause is diabetes. Diabetes also doubles or quadruples the chance of heart disease, and can cause nerve damage and stroke. Simplified measures such as the Three As should teach people that diabetes management can be more practical for them, said Baldemor. The diabetologist also discussed the plate method, a classic measurement for food groups. Imagine the plate as quartered: fill half with veggies, a fourth with protein, and a fourth with carbohydrates like rice. On the side, you Continue reading >>

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