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Diabetes In The Military

Can You Serve In The Military With Diabetes?

Can You Serve In The Military With Diabetes?

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. As we approach Memorial Day and recognize those serving ourcountry, we thought it would be worthwhile to look at the ease with whichpeople with diabetes are able to serve in the military, and how that's changedthrough the years. Sadly, the picture isn'tas optimistic as we would have hoped. While access to militaryservice for PWDs has gotten a little better over time, not much has changed andit remains mostly hit-or-miss when it comes to someone being able to servedespite their condition. The American DiabetesAssociation's legal advocacy director, Katie Hathaway,says it's pretty much "a mixed bag" and military service is off limits for most PWDs. It comes down toan individual being able to educate a military medical panel that he or she canstill serve despite their diagnosis, often battling the same misconceptions andperceptions that plague those of us on the civilian side. Our battle is theirbattle, and the war spills into all ranks and military branches, apparently. Of course, we have totalk types here. Really, we're only talking about those PWDs already diagnosedwith type 1 or dependent on insulin at the time they wish to enter themilitary. The possibility of service pretty much becomes a non sequitur whenyou're living with a pre-existing condition. Growing up, I was toldspecifically as long as I could remember that serving in the military wasn'tpossible thanks to my type 1 diabetes. So that killed any thought of followingin the footsteps of my maternal grandfather who served in World World II. Iwouldn't describe it as a "dream" of mine to serve, but if I'd hadthe chance I might have explored it as a possible path. Sa Continue reading >>

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: In The Military

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: In The Military

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: In the Military The military does a lot to ensure that its members stay fit and healthy. Daily exercise routines, healthy meals, and regular checkups are all a part of being ready to defend our nation. However, life sometimes throws you a curve ball as it did with me when I developed diabetes while I was on Active Duty. The bad news is that hundreds of service members are diagnosed with diabetes each year. This bad news can bring a host of ramifications if diabetes is not managed and an A1C is not kept under 6.0. Medical alert tags are prescribed, medical restrictions are implemented, and you run the risk of not being able to deploy to combat. The good news is that there is perhaps no better place to be diabetic than in the military as there are a ton of resources available to you, and forced upon you, to get you healthy. These resources were apparent to me during my diagnoses and to be honest, I was overwhelmed by the support. Not only were there diabetic counselors available to help service members understand their new disease, but there were also nutrition counselors, doctors, and a prescribed treatment plan. Looking back, I believe that there is no reason for a service member to become a diabetic as long as they watch their diet and get in several hours of exercise per week. If given the opportunity, many of us will skip out on one or the other. Looking at my case of diabetes, I often wonder if I could have avoided being a diabetic by doing a little more physical exercise, or by eating healthier meals. Considering that I was able to get my A1C to an acceptable level by dieting and exercise, the answer is a resounding yes. A1c Blood Sugar Diabetes Health living with diabetes military type 2 diabetes Your email address will not be publish Continue reading >>

Effect Of Military Deployment On Diabetes Mellitus In Air Force Personnel

Effect Of Military Deployment On Diabetes Mellitus In Air Force Personnel

Effect of Military Deployment on Diabetes Mellitus in Air Force Personnel Division of Endocrinology, San Antonio Military Medical Center, MCH-ZDM-E 3551 Roger Brooke Dr. JBSA-Ft. Sam Houston, TX 78234 Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, San Antonio Military Medical Center, MCH-ZDM-E 3551 Roger Brooke Dr. JBSA-Ft. Sam Houston, TX 78234 Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes Center of Excellence, Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, 1100 Wilford Hall Loop, Bldg 4554 JBSA-Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236 Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes Center of Excellence, Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, 1100 Wilford Hall Loop, Bldg 4554 JBSA-Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236 Search for other works by this author on: Defense Health Agency, 3515 S General McMullen Suite 200, San Antonio, TX 78226 Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, San Antonio Military Medical Center, MCH-ZDM-E 3551 Roger Brooke Dr. JBSA-Ft. Sam Houston, TX 78234 Search for other works by this author on: Defense Health Agency, 3515 S General McMullen Suite 200, San Antonio, TX 78226 Search for other works by this author on: Defense Health Agency, 3515 S General McMullen Suite 200, San Antonio, TX 78226 Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, San Antonio Military Medical Center, MCH-ZDM-E 3551 Roger Brooke Dr. JBSA-Ft. Sam Houston, TX 78234 Search for other works by this author on: Irene Folaron, Mark W True, Jana L Wardian, Tom J Sauerwein, Alan Sim, Joshua M Tate, Alexander G Rittel, Lee Ann Zarzabal, Sky D Graybill; Effect of Military Deployment on Diabetes Mellitus in Air Force Personnel, Military Medicine, Military deployments relocate service members to austere locations with lim Continue reading >>

Can You Join The Military If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Join The Military If You Have Diabetes?

It’s patriotic and noble to join the armed forces to fight for your freedom and country. Not only that, it can offer a fully-paid trip to college, early retirement, good insurance, a 0% down VA home loan, and a whole host of other perks. If you graduate from a military school, not only do you get a free ride, but you also get to go in as an officer after you graduate, with competitive pay and excellent benefits. If you are active duty, you get insurance through Tricare, which is pretty good insurance. More people have picked themselves up out of poverty by joining the military then by any other means, so it can be a sweet deal for some. What about Pre-diabetes, Type 1, Type 1.5, or Type 2 Diabetes and the military? But what if you have Pre-diabetes, Type 1, Type 1.5, or Type 2 diabetes? Will you be allowed to join the ranks of the military, and serve your country, or will you be told that you are unfit to serve? Will you be permanently disqualified for military service (PDQ’d)? This is a question that many people living with pre-diabetes and diabetes of all types have asked, especially since both have reached epidemic proportions in the United States. It would seem discriminatory for someone with pre-diabetes or diabetes to be told that they cannot serve in the military. It would also seem wrong to discharge a person in the military because they were diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes during their time of service. Here are some other popular questions our readers have asked: In researching this topic, this does seem to be happening on a regular basis, especially when you are trying to see a recruiter and get in, or when you are diagnosed while in active duty and do not fight the system to try to stay in. Let’s look at whether or not you will be told no if you Continue reading >>

Can You Do This Job?

Can You Do This Job?

Nat Strand, MD, a winner of "The Amazing Race," lives with type 1 diabetes. Many careers are wide open to people with diabetes, but others have a ways to go. NASA evaluates all applicants on a case-by-case basis. Some athletes with diabetes include Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, NASCAR driver Miguel Paludo , LPGA golfer Michelle McGann, former Olympic swimmer Gary Hall, Jr., marathoner Missy Foy, and Tampa Bay Rays outfielder Sam Fuld . Zippora Karz was a world-class ballerina with type 1 diabetes and now teaches. Art Smith, Paula Deen, Sam Talbot, and Charles Mattocks are all successful chefs with diabetes. People with diabetes are able to pilot personal aircraft but are still banned from flying with passengers. The American Diabetes Association is fighting the ban. Prospective agents undergo a medical evaluation, during which those with diabetes are assessed on their ability to successfully manage their diabetes. The State Department requires all applicants to undergo a medical evaluation, during which people with diabetes are assessed on their ability to successfully manage their diabetes. Read about two diplomats . All branches of the militaryArmy, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guardbar anyone with diabetes from joining, though people diagnosed while already in service are not always discharged. Ginger Vieira, Cliff Scherb, and Simon Bennett are among trainers with diabetes. Prospective officers undergo a medical evaluation, during which those with diabetes are assessed on their ability to successfully manage their diabetes. Nat Strand, MD, won The Amazing Race with her diabetes gear in tow; it all had to fit in one backpack. School bus driver licenses are regulated by the state, however, so some states may still have restrictions. In the past, people Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

I received several emails about helping the reader repair their diet. Here is a " Diet Plan "I refer people to with a motivating and humorous picture as well as a free downloadable sample week of diet information.I also have a newer plan called the " Get Lean Diet " that is very effective. Also seemy " Food Plan "(Word document)for more ideas.However, you should visit a registered dietician if you are severely overweight or pre-diabetic. Pre-diabetic refers to Type II diabetes and usually occurs in older and/or obese people who do not have to have a family history of diabetes. 80% of type II diabetics are overweight.This type of diabetes can be prevented or significantly delayed by watching processed sugar intake, add fiber foods, and regular daily exercise. Here is the related question.The former Army soldier writes: "My doctor says my blood sugar is too high and I have tried exercise, a no carbohydrate diet, and am having trouble keeping my blood sugar and my weight down." As you know I am not a doctor, but there are still two areas you need to focus on. The fact that you stated your sentence in the past tense causes me to ask - Are you still fairly active and exercise regularly? Daily? And - Are you watching portions and types of foods you are eating? You can have high blood sugar because you are eating foods or soft drinks or juices with sugar in them. It could be as simple as adding more fiber to your diet by eating fiber rich fruits / vegetables.But it can be fairly complicated as well as your body can make glycogen (blood sugar) just about anything.Glycogen is your go-to fuel source and is sometimes referred to as blood sugar. It is used by the body for major body functions and high intensity workouts.It is made from glucose which is found in almost every food, Continue reading >>

Can You Join The Military With Diabetes?

Can You Join The Military With Diabetes?

You are here: Home Military Recruiting Can you Join the Military with Diabetes? Joining the military is a very noble and patriotic thing to do. Fighting to preserve the freedom of this great country is something many want to do, but can you join the military with diabetes? Questions around military recruiting and diabetes have been asked for many years. There are multiple types of diabetes and even pre-diabetes to consider. If youre considering joining the military , but youre afraid because of diabetes, heres the information you seek. If you have pre-diabetes, Type 1, Type 1.5 or Type 2 diabetes, its not as easy as simply joining the military. Questions may come up about your diabetic condition and even though it may seem discriminatory for the military to tell someone they cannot serve due to this condition, the military is known for rejecting people due to health issues. Before we start to get too worried, its important to look at how military recruiting and diabetes relate. Its also important to look at what could happen if youre diagnosed with diabetes as a member of the military. Why Should Diabetes Be a Problem in the Military? Looking at the reality of the situation will help to show why diabetes presents a problem for military members. Imagine you have been sent overseas to somewhere in the Middle East. Its hot, you only get MREs (meals ready to eat) for meals and you may have to go long periods without eating. MREs consist mainly of carbohydrates and the heat makes it very difficult to keep your insulin from being exposed to extremely high temperatures. With your unit constantly moving, you getting very little sleep and the high stress situations, this type of work could become very dangerous to your health. If youre in this type of situation and you live wit Continue reading >>

In The Marine Corps With Type 1 Diabetes

In The Marine Corps With Type 1 Diabetes

Jeremy Yancey was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 32, in March 2010, while serving in the Marine Corps. Today, Jeremy is35 years old and lives on the Crystal Coast on Emerald Isle, NC. He and his wife have been married for almost 3 years, and while they talk about one day having children, for now they have cat named Toonces. A fisherman and hunter by hobby (enjoying the speckled trout and red fish this season), Jeremy is an awesomely impressive example of persistence and determination under the pressure of a high-maintenace disease in a career that is 24/7 and sometimes very dangerous. Ginger: What is your position/station in the Marine Corps? Jeremy:I am a Gunnery Sergeant serving the billet as the Staff Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge of the Quality Assurance Division as an H-1 Mechanic Quality Assurance Representative. Basically, my job is to ensure quality in aircraft maintenance and maintenance program management throughout the squadron. I am currently stationed with Marine Light Attack Helicopter 467 SABERS at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina. It is an AH-1W Super Cobra and UH-1N Huey Attack Helicopter Squadron. Ginger: Tell me a bit about your diagnosis story? Jeremy: I was just too stubborn and proud to go into the Navy Medical Clinic and get my symptoms checked out. I was hoping that whatever was wrong with me would just pass but as it progressed and I started researching and reality set in. First, I started losing weight. I lost about 35 pounds (I have always been 180 pounds consistently) and dropped to 145 on a 5ft 11 in frame in less than 3 months. My belt would not pull tight enough to hold my trousers up and was constantly thirsty ( I was pounding water all the time). It was difficult to hold a conversation with out my Continue reading >>

Estimating Diabetes Prevalence In The Military Health System Population From 2006 To 2010.

Estimating Diabetes Prevalence In The Military Health System Population From 2006 To 2010.

Estimating diabetes prevalence in the Military Health System population from 2006 to 2010. Healthcare Informatics Division, United States Air Force Medical Support Agency, 3515 S General McMullen Suite 200, San Antonio, TX 78226, USA. Mil Med. 2013 Sep;178(9):986-93. doi: 10.7205/MILMED-D-13-00147. Evidence-based articles have demonstrated an increase in diabetes prevalence, but diabetes prevalence in the enrolled Military Health System population was previously understudied. Variability in diabetes prevalence rates calculated from 5 groups of algorithms was examined in the Military Health System population (3 million enrollees per year) from fiscal years 2006 to 2010. Time trend analysis and rate comparisons to the U.S. population were also performed. Increasing linear trends in diabetes prevalence from 2006 to 2010 were seen in all algorithms, though considerable rate variation was observed within each study year. Prevalence increased with age, except for a slight decrease in those 75 years. Overall diagnosed diabetes prevalence ranged from 7.26% to 11.22% in 2006 and from 8.29% to 13.55% in 2010. Prevalence among active duty members remained stable, but a significant upward trend was observed among nonactive duty members across study years. Age-standardized rates among nonactive duty females were higher than the U.S. population rates from 2006 to 2010. This study demonstrates prevalence rate variability because of differing case algorithms and shows evidence of a growing diabetes population in the Military Health System, specifically within the nonactive duty 45 years and older demographic groups. Further research of this population should focus on validation of case definitions. Continue reading >>

Avoiding Diabetes | Military.com

Avoiding Diabetes | Military.com

Eighteen million Americans have diabetes, but did you know that over 90% of all diabetes cases can either be prevented or significantly delayed? And guess what can help you avoid diabetes? The amazing panacea of exercise and healthy diet is the answer. It seems the many medical studies published concerning American health all come back to fitness. From the National Institute of Health webpage, diabetes is defined in three categories: Type I diabetes is a very serious and non-preventable condition where the patient needs a daily dose of insulin since the pancreas does not produce it at all or in enough quantities. Type II diabetes usually occurs in older and/or obese people who do not have to have a family history of diabetes. 80% of type II diabetics are overweight, and as our children are increasingly sharing in America's overweight statistics, juvenile diabetes is growing at alarming rates. The third type of diabetes is gestational diabetes which occurs in pregnant women. Of the millions of Americans with diabetes, it is amazing that the preventable form of Type II makes up an overwhelming majority of the cases. This is extremely serious, since diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.A totaling over 70,000 people every year and costing over $132 billion annually in direct and indirect costs. Diabetics should see their doctor several times a year and receive regular eye and feet examinations since blindness and amputations of the lower limbs are common effects of the disease. Now, that you are more informed on the topic, what can you do to avoid diabetes? The Stew Smith answer is quite simple - Get up off your butt, start moving more, and eating less sugary foods, like junk foods, and drinking sodas. Eat less from the drive-thru and more from the garde Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Military

Diabetes In The Military

There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, learning from failure. Serving in the US military requires a certain level of physical fitness and freedom from any disability that may require excessive time lost from duty for necessary treatment. When civilians apply to join the military, therefore, they are required to pass a medical exam and to disclose information about their medical history. While not all medical conditions disqualify a person from joining the military, many do, and any type of diabetes generally does. Developing diabetes while already serving in the military, however, is not automatic grounds for separation (retirement) from the military. Several hundred service members (out of more than 1.4 million currently serving) are diagnosed with diabetes each year. Between 1997 and 2007, fewer than 6% of diabetes diagnoses were Type 1 diabetes , 80% were Type 2 diabetes , and the remaining 14% were not consistently reported as either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Because active service members have mandatory medical examinations and free access to health care, it is thought that there are few undiagnosed cases of diabetes among military personnel. Service members who develop diabetes and cannot maintain an HbA1c level below 7% without medication are referred to a medical evaluation board, which assesses their medical fitness and makes recommendations about follow-up care. As is the case for civilians, being overweight or obese puts a service member at higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. In 2011, the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center reported that between January 1998 and December 2010, nearly 400,000 of its active members had at least one overweight-related medical diagnosis. Factors that are most commonly correlated Continue reading >>

Military Service And Diabetes

Military Service And Diabetes

Join the fight against diabetes on Facebook There are few things more disappointing to a potential military recruit than to find out that they have diabetes and cannot sign up. As one can imagine, military members need to be strong, healthy and free from any disability that would require attention while in the field. The equipment they carry into battle cannot include needles and insulin. When someone makes the decision to join a branch of the military, they are subject to a battery of tests for aptitude, intelligence and strength. They also receive a full medical evaluation. It is here that recruits sometimes learn for the first time that they are pre-diabetic or diabetic. While a diagnosis of diabetes requiring treatment is an automatic disqualification from enlistment, being pre-diabetic does not automatically rule out service in the military. Doctors will consult with the potential recruit to educate them on the changes they need to make in order to reduce their risk. They might ask them to institute their changes for a period of time - six months or a year - and then come back and re-apply. Assuming that they have improved their A1c numbers and are not in need of treatment, they could then be eligible to enlist. Some may feel the exclusion of persons with diabetes from service in the military is discriminatory. Unfortunately, federal anti-discrimination laws don't apply to the military. For those already serving in the military who receive a diagnosis of pre-diabetes or diabetes, separation from the service is not necessarily a given. Those service members who cannot achieve and maintain an A1c of 7.0 or below are referred to a medical evaluation board, which assesses their overall fitness and makes recommendations about further care. The military takes very serio Continue reading >>

Military And Diabetics | Diabetic Connect

Military And Diabetics | Diabetic Connect

I am all for equality and understanding in this world. I am a liberal, highly educated woman. Some of your replies are just ludicrous. The military is not being discriminatory by not allowing diabetes in the military. My step daughter is a type 1 diabetic and in ROTC at her high-school. While I want her to be all she can be, this will not be one of them. That is life and the cards she has been dealt. While I wish she didn't have to deal with diabetes, she does and her life will still be amazing. While there are other positions in the military she could do she would not be combat ready. It is just insane to start a waiver, the military is not singling diabetics out. DIABETICS CANNOT BE COMBAT READY AND THAT IS THAT. I am not an "every child deserves a blue ribbon supporter". Some things in life will not be obtained andthats ok, happiness is around another corner. If in combat a soldier had a low glucose or couldn't eat for a day, drink water or take insulin their life would be in danger. This is not to mention the soldiers next to them depending on their orientation to the surroundings. What I am saying is the military is not trying to do you wrong. They are protecting the individuals in this country, their soldiers and even if you dont see it this wayYOU!!! I know the pain. I wanted to join since i found out what the military does, protect the country. But, that all changed when I was eight. From what I understand though, the border patrol accepts diabetics, and they do essentially the same thing, just on american soil. All be it, through extensive hoop jumping. There's some hope after all. IF ANYONE WANTS TO JOIN THE FORCES PLEASE FEEL FREE TO SIGN MY POTITION IN WILL POST THE INFO TOMMOROW AND THE LINK AND LETS BRAKE THE BARRIER BETWEEN DIABETES AND THE ARMED FORCES. Continue reading >>

The Military And Type 1 Diabetes More Of A Connection Than We Think

The Military And Type 1 Diabetes More Of A Connection Than We Think

The military and Type 1 diabetes more of a connection than we think Happy Friday folks, I know Im in desperate need of a weekend! Im usually pretty lighthearted on Friday posts, but this time I need to turn your attention to a very specific sub-group of people with Type 1 diabetes. Do you know anyone who was serving in the military and diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes during or shortly after deployment? If so, they are not alone. Turns out this pattern of developing diabetes in conjunction with serving in the military is very common enough that some doctors, scientists, and concerned veterans are starting to explore this phenomenon in hopes that it leads to more information about why anyone develop Type 1 diabetes. A friend of mine started a Facebook group for folks in this sub-group of people with Type 1, and if you or someone you know was diagnosed during or after serving in the armed forces, Id recommend you join in on the discussion. In addition to exploring the mystery of the military-diabetes connection, this group could be influential in changing the resources available to people with diabetes in the military. And I am all for anything that helps folks with the betes. Click here for the info. On that noteis it happy hour yet? Its five oclock somewhere right? Continue reading >>

Discharge To Deployment: Military Diabetes Management Changes Over 50 Years

Discharge To Deployment: Military Diabetes Management Changes Over 50 Years

WASHINGTON In 1964, a diagnosis of diabetes led to immediate discharge from the Army. Today, soldiers with well-managed diabetes can continue to have long and successful military careers. With the increased understanding of diabetes and the improvements in medications available for treatment, soldiers are even deployable to combat zones, if their diabetes is well-controlled and their treatment is stable, said Col. John Spain, PharmD, the Army Surgeon Generals consultant for pharmacy. The change in career outlook for diabetic soldiers comes as a result of the improved ability of devices and medications to control diabetes. Soldier serving in Kuwait in 2007 checks his blood sugar. Army photo by Spc. Wesley Landrum The regulations covering medical retention standards for soldiers now take into account how well managed the soldiers diabetes is, the overall risk of complications for the individual soldier and the access to care the soldier will have when considering if the soldier meets standards to remain in the Army and deploy to an overseas or combat environment, Spain said. In the past half-century, heart attack, stroke and death rates among diabetic patients have been significantly reduced because of a better understanding of the disease and the development of new treatments. Life expectancy for diabetic patients has increased significantly in the past few decades. Before 1965, the life expectancy for a patient with Type I diabetes was 53.8 years. By 1980, the life expectancy had increased by 15 years, Spain pointed out. Continue reading >>

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