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Diabetes In The Elderly Statistics

Diabetes And The Elderly

Diabetes And The Elderly

Tweet Both average life expectancy and the prevalence of diabetes are continuing to rise. Amongst the elderly population, type 2 diabetes is a growing problem, and a larger proportion of newly diagnosed diabetics are older. Treating and diagnosing diabetes amongst the elderly requires a flexible and unique approach. What are the differences in diagnosing diabetes amongst the elderly when compared to diabetes amongst the young? There are numerous physiological changes underway as our bodies grow and adapt to their age. Elderly people who are at risk of developing diabetes, or who have already developed the disease, may not exhibit the classic symptoms expected. Age-related changes can mean that some symptoms will be masked, or harder to spot. What are the differences in treatment of diabetes amongst the elderly when compared to diabetes amongst the young? Treating diabetes amongst the elderly can present unique challenges. Other disabilities associated with aging can contribute to the complexity of strictly self-managing diabetes. Impaired physical functioning amongst some elderly patients can mean that adjusting to a diabetes care routine is more difficult. Cognitive impairment can also provide an obstacle. Are there increased risks when an elderly person develops diabetes? Elderly people are often more frail and susceptible to illness. This can mean diabetes-related complications are more common and harder to manage. Furthermore, exercise and adapting a diet can be more difficult for elderly people, and problems can arise in these areas. All diabetes complications can occur amongst older patients. Cognitive complications are more common amongst the elderly. Further problems may include undiagnosed depression, social issues, limited daily means and coexisting health pro Continue reading >>

Percentage Of Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes By Age Group

Percentage Of Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes By Age Group

Tools: State data based upon the BRFSS, an ongoing, state-based, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of noninstitutionalized civilian adults aged 18 years and older. Women who indicated that they had diabetes only during pregnancy were not included in these data. Total adults diagnosed with diabetes by state have been age-adjusted to the U.S. population in 2000. Continue reading >>

Data And Statistics

Data And Statistics

The challenge of diabetes There are about 60 million people with diabetes in the European Region, or about 10.3% of men and 9.6% of women aged 25 years and over. Prevalence of diabetes is increasing among all ages in the European Region, mostly due to increases in overweight and obesity, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. Worldwide, high blood glucose kills about 3.4 million people annually. Almost 80% of these deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, and almost half are people aged under 70 years. WHO projects diabetes deaths will double between 2005 and 2030. Risk factors Patterns of disease differ by ethnic group: type 2 diabetes is up to six times more common in people of South Asian descent and up to three times more common among those of African and African-Caribbean origin. Diet: Eating high levels of refined carbohydrates and saturated fat and not enough fruits and vegetables contributes to weight gain, thereby increasing the risk of diabetes. Physical inactivity: Studies have shown that just 30 minutes of moderate exercise a day, five days a week is enough to promote good health and reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes. Overweight and obesity (BMI over 25 kg/m2) have been estimated to account for about 65–80% of new cases of type 2 diabetes. The risk is a function of the age of onset and the duration of obesity, and weight gain during adult life. Overweight people run a lower relative risk than obese people, however the fraction of disease attributable to overweight may be as high as, if not higher than, that due to obesity. This demonstrates the importance of preventing weight gain in all ranges. Low birth weight is associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Age: The older a person is, the greater their risk of dia Continue reading >>

The Elderly And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

The Elderly And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

According to the American Diabetes Association, as we get older, our chances of getting Type 2 diabetes increases. They claim that one in four Americans over the age of 60 has diabetes.1 Carolyn contacted The Diabetes Council… When Carolyn contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she was concerned about her mother who is elderly and is living with diabetes. She didn’t know much about her medications, or how they might interact with her other medications. She was worried that her mother’s low blood sugar while she was home alone may be related to her worsening memory. In addition to referring Carolyn to a local Certified Diabetes Educator, we, at TheDiabetesCouncil, decided to write a guide for the elderly with diabetes that people like Carolyn could refer to. In the following article we will explore many different guidelines and recommendations, along with nutritional, activity, pharmaceutical, and financial and estate planning considerations. Those are just a few of the issues that we will touch on related to the elderly with diabetes. So let’s get started with some general and medication considerations first… General guidelines for the elderly with diabetes The following are some general guidelines to consider when treating the elderly with diabetes: Recommendation for the Eldery with Diabetes Depression screening in the elderly population with diabetes is of great importance, as elderly patients with diabetes experience more isolation, less support, and more feeling of hopelessness Avoiding low blood sugar is of paramount importance, and A1C and blood sugar goals should be adjusted, along with careful pharmaceutical management The elderly with diabetes who are capable of activities of daily living without assistance, and who have no cognitive impairment should have A1 Continue reading >>

The Prevalence And Risk Of Diabetes In The Elderly

The Prevalence And Risk Of Diabetes In The Elderly

There’s no sugar-coating these facts. According to the latest statistics released by the American Diabetes Association, diabetes affects over 29 million Americans – that’s just over 9 percent of our population. However, diabetes in the elderly is even more prevalent; Americans aged 65 and over account for about 11.8 million of those with diabetes, meaning that about 1 in 4 seniors suffers from the disease. What may be even more sobering is the fact that, by-and-large, individuals with elderly diabetes could have taken action to prevent or delay the condition, which is caused in part by lifestyle choices. There are two types of diabetes that typically affect different portions of the population: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 was previously known as juvenile diabetes, as it is typically diagnosed in children and younger adults, and is caused by the body’s inability to produce insulin, a hormone that allows the body to use sugar as energy. Type 1 diabetes accounts for only about 5 percent of diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, accounts for the overwhelming majority of diabetes in the elderly and other age groups. This form of diabetes is caused by insulin resistance, which is when the body does not properly use the insulin that it creates. Many doctors believe insulin resistance has a possible link to risk factors like obesity and high blood pressure. Those who are risk for developing type 2 diabetes often have “pre-diabetes,” or higher than normal blood sugar levels that are not quite high enough to warrant a diabetes diagnosis. For older adults whose lifestyles may leave them at risk for diabetes, it is imperative to schedule regular blood sugar level checks with their doctor. If you are diagnosed with pre-diabetes, the Centers f Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In The Elderly: Challenges In A Unique Patient Population

Type 2 Diabetes In The Elderly: Challenges In A Unique Patient Population

*Corresponding author: David Bradley, Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, USA, Tel: (614) 685-3333, E-mail: [email protected] J Geriatr Med Gerontol, JGMG-2-014, (Volume 2, Issue 2), Review Article; ISSN: 2469-5858 Citation: Bradley D, Hsueh W (2016) Type 2 Diabetes in the Elderly: Challenges in a Unique Patient Population. J Geriatr Med Gerontol 2:014. 10.23937/2469-5858/1510014 Copyright: © 2016 Bradley D, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Older Adults

Diabetes In Older Adults

What is the epidemiology and pathogenesis of diabetes in older adults? According to the most recent surveillance data, the prevalence of diabetes among U.S. adults aged ≥65 years varies from 22 to 33%, Continue reading >>

Older Australia At A Glance

Older Australia At A Glance

Diabetes is a chronic condition characterised by high levels of glucose in the blood. It is caused either by the bodys inability to produce insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas to control blood glucose (sugar) levels), or by the body not being able to use insulin effectively [7]. There are 3 main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is an unpreventable autoimmune disease that develops when the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. Although type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, it mainly develops during childhood and adolescence. Insulin replacement is an essential treatment for type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes requires a careful balance of diet, exercise and insulin intake. Type 2 diabetes is largely preventable by maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and occurs when the body becomes resistant to the insulin being produced by the pancreas and/or the amount produced is inadequate to meet the body's needs. When first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, blood glucose levels can often be maintained at normal levels through lifestyle modification and/or oral glucose lowering medication, although insulin may eventually be required as the condition progresses. Gestational diabetes is a condition marked by high blood sugar levels appearing for the first time during pregnancy that usually disappears once the baby is born. Gestational diabetes, much like type 2 diabetes, can be associated with lifestyle factors and is treated with a combination of lifestyle modifications and medication [7, 9]. Based on the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 201415 National Health Survey (NHS), around 1 in 6 people aged over 65 reported having diabetesjust over 574,000 people [2]. The rate of diabetes tends to increase with age, with the highest prevalence (19.4%) re Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Elderly Adults: Statistics & Care Guidelines

Diabetes In Elderly Adults: Statistics & Care Guidelines

Diabetes is on the rise for adults over the age of sixty-five. In fact, elderly adults – over the age of sixty-five – are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes than any other age group. Due to this fact, it is important to understand exactly the signs of diabetes and prediabetes, and how to care for the older adult once they are diagnosed. Studies show that more than 25% of individuals over the age of sixty-five have diabetes. In addition, over half of adults in this age group have prediabetes. As the baby-boomers age, this epidemic will only increase the rates of diabetes. Elderly statistics will rise with this increase. Prediabetes Prediabetes is a gray area between normal blood sugar levels and full blown diabetes. Typically at this stage, a person will have no symptoms or no clear symptoms of diabetes and may not even be aware something is wrong. While in this stage, an individual will have some of the markers for diabetes but not all of them. They may even be experiencing some of the negative side effects without realizing it. Prediabetes does not turn into full diabetes in all patients, but it can typically within ten years’ time. For some, early treatment can stop the advance. Changes in lifestyle habits such as diet and exercise can reverse the effects at this point. Diabetes Complications Diabetes is a very serious disease as it can lead to other life-threatening illnesses. High blood pressure often comes with diabetes. Elderly people can have many complications including strokes and heart attacks. Also, the pressure puts strain on the eyes which leads to eye problems. Kidney disease and kidney failure as well can result from uncorrected diabetes. Elderly patients will find that their smaller blood vessels are being damaged. This damage will hinder th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Elderly

Diabetes Mellitus In Elderly

We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Diabetes mellitus (DM) frequency is a growing problem worldwide, because of long life expectancy and life style modifications. In old age (6065 years old), DM is becoming an alarming public health problem in developed and even in developing countries as for some authors one from two old persons are diabetic or prediabetic and for others 8 from 10 old persons have some dysglycemia. DM complications and co-morbidities are more frequent in old diabetics compared to their young counterparts. The most frequent are cardiovascular diseases due to old age and to precocious atherosclerosis specific to DM and the most bothersome are visual and cognitive impairments, especially Alzheimer disease and other kind of dementia. Alzheimer disease seems to share the same risk factors as DM, which means insulin resistance due to lack of physical activity and eating disorders. Visual and physical handicaps, depression, and memory troubles are a barrier to care for DM treatment. For this, old diabetics are now classified into two main categories as fit and independent old people able to take any available medication, exactly as their young or middle age counterparts, and fragile or frail persons for whom physical activity, healthy diet, and medical treatment should be individualized according to the presence or lack of cognitive impairment and other co-morbidities. In the last category, the fundamental Continue reading >>

Healthy Aging Facts

Healthy Aging Facts

For most older adults, good health ensures independence, security, and productivity as they age. Yet millions struggle every day with health and safety challenges such as chronic disease, falls, and mental health issues—all of which can severely impact quality of life. Chronic Disease Approximately 80% of older adults have at least one chronic disease, and 77% have at least two. Four chronic diseases—heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes—cause almost two-thirds of all deaths each year. Chronic diseases account for 75% of the money our nation spends on health care, yet only 1% of health dollars are spent on public efforts to improve overall health. Diabetes affects 12.2 million Americans aged 60+, or 23% of the older population. An additional 57 million Americans aged 20+ have pre-diabetes, which increases a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. In a 2007 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention program for people at high risk for developing diabetes, lifestyle intervention reduced risk by 71% among those aged 60+. 90% of Americans aged 55+ are at risk for hypertension, or high blood pressure. Women are more likely than men to develop hypertension, with half of women aged 60+ and 77% of women aged 75+ having this condition. Hypertension affects 64% of men aged 75+. Falls Every 15 seconds, an older adult is treated in the emergency room for a fall; every 29 minutes, an older adult dies following a fall. Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of fractures, hospital admissions for trauma, and injury deaths. Falls are also the most common cause of older adult traumatic brain injuries, accounting for over 46% of fatal falls. The nation spends $30 billion a year treating older adults for the effects of falls. If we can Continue reading >>

Diabetes Factfile | Age International

Diabetes Factfile | Age International

The prevalence of diabetes in older age groups is high, and growing rapidly. Without treatment, older people with diabetes are at higher risk of developing complications and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs) than younger people. Nine percent of adults globally have diabetes, which is one of the four leading NCDs across the world.[1,2] Type 2 diabetes makes up 90% of cases worldwide, but can bemanaged inexpensively with early diagnosis and treatment.[3] Diabetes-related deaths are predicted to rise by over 50 per cent in the next 10 years.[4] More than 80 per cent of diabetes-related deaths occur in low and middle income countries.[5] Levels of diagonsed and undiagonsed type 2 diabetes increase with age, leading to a significantly higher prevalence in older people. In China, for example, diabetes prevelance in the over-70 age group is almost double that in those aged 50-59.[6,7] Global data sets do not routinely record data for older people or disaggregate data by age. Lack of data contributes to low levels of awareness of diabetes in older people, by policy makers, service providers and older people themselves.[8] This leads to a lack of services targeted at people in older age and older people not seeking treatment until their condition is well advanced. For example, when surveyed, 15 per cent of people with type 2 diabetes in South Africa[9] and 20 per cent in India[10] had not received treatment in the previous year. Lack of treatment increases the risk of complications, such as heart attacks, kidney failure, blindness and amputations.[11] Older people with diabetes are also more likely to have other conditions, particularly cardiovascular disease, stroke and hypertension. Data from Ghana, for example, has shown that 80 per cent of older people with diabetes al Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the 2017 Diabetes Statistics Report with estimates for “prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs.” Where are we now? There are 30.3 million people with diabetes (9.4% of the US population) including 23.1 million people who are diagnosed and 7.2 million people (23.8%) undiagnosed. The numbers for prediabetes indicate that 84.1 million adults (33.9% of the adult U.S. population) have prediabetes, including 23.1 million adults aged 65 years or older (the age group with highest rate). The estimated percentage of individuals with type 1 diabetes remains at 5% among those with diabetes. The statistics are also provided by age, gender, ethnicity, and for each state/territory so you can search for these specifics. The CDC has produced wonderful infographics, “A Snapshot of Diabetes in the U.S.” and “Prediabes: Could it be You?” for everyone to use and reproduce. They illustrate estimates for diabetes, prediabetes, the cost of diabetes (dollars, risk of death, medical costs), specifics about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and a “What You Can Do” section. If we compare the numbers with previous estimates, we see that there has been an increase in those with diabetes and a decrease in those with prediabetes. However, the numbers are all still extremely high, and the costs and health burdens are staggering! What can we do with these statistics? Use them to help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes in the U.S. Share the positive messages regarding prevention strategies with those at risk of developing or with type 2 diabetes Distribute the information to local media and Continue reading >>

Aging, Diabetes, And The Public Health System In The United States

Aging, Diabetes, And The Public Health System In The United States

Go to: A GROWING PROBLEM According to estimates for 2010, 10.9 million Americans aged 65 years or older had diabetes.1 The prevalence of prediabetes among Americans of this age, derived from results of fasting glucose or hemoglobin A1c testing in 2005 to 2008 and applied to 2010 data, was estimated to be 50%, indicating an extremely large reservoir of older adults at high risk for type 2 diabetes.1 Together, these results indicate that almost 8 in 10 older adults in the United States have some form of dysglycemia. National survey data showed that the incidence of diagnosed diabetes among Americans aged 65 to 79 years increased by 65% from 1997 to 2003.9 For 2010, 390 000 new cases were estimated to have occurred among Americans aged 65 years and older.1 At the same time, from 1980 to 2004, the estimated number of Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes increased from 2.3 million to 5.8 million, and diabetes accounted for 32% of all Medicare spending during that period.10 The incidence of diabetes among Medicare beneficiaries aged 67 years or older also increased by 36.9% between 1997 and 2003.10 The number of Americans aged 65 years or older who are diagnosed with diabetes is projected to increase from 6.3 million in 2005 to 26.7 million by 2050 (a 3.2-fold increase), and the percentage of diabetic persons aged 65 years or older is projected to increase from 39% to 55% (Figure 1).6 In 2004, 25% of US nursing home residents had diabetes,11,12 and in 2007, 86% of all US deaths associated with diabetes were among people aged 60 years or older.13 Most older adults with diabetes also have other major chronic diseases. A study of chronic disease prevalence among Americans aged 65 years or older during 1999 to 2004 found substantial comorbidities: prevalence of diabetes alone was Continue reading >>

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