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Diabetes In Teenage Girl

Type 2 Diabetes In Teenagers

Type 2 Diabetes In Teenagers

Eating healthy and reducing weight can help control blood sugar levels A diagnosis of diabetes can be a big shock. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in children and teens but is still relatively rare. We look at the steps you can take to manage your diabetes and lead a healthy life. Whilst type 2 diabetes before adulthood is relatively rare, if you are obese, you will have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. If you have any members of your close family with type 2 diabetes or are of South Asian heritage, this also raises the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. How do I know whether I have type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is characterised by high blood sugar levels and the symptoms of high sugar levels include increased thirst and hunger, frequent lethargy, needing to wee more often than usual and areas of dark skin on the neck or armpits. Will I have type 2 diabetes for the rest of my life? Sadly type 2 diabetes doesn't have a cure so people if you develop type 2 diabetes you will need to manage it for the rest of your life. With this said, it is possible not to have to be on medication for life. If you can achieve a healthy weight, it may be possible to come off medication and manage your diabetes through healthy eating and exercise. How do I get my blood glucose levels under control? Making healthy food choices and taking part in an hour's physical activity each day should help to lower your blood sugar levels. These steps will also help in other ways such as being beneficial for the health of your heart. You may also be given medication to help bring your sugar levels under control. A common form of medication is a tablet called metformin which works by limiting your liver from raising your blood sugar levels. If your blood glucose levels are high, you may b Continue reading >>

When Your Teen Just Quits: Diabetes And The Teenage Years

When Your Teen Just Quits: Diabetes And The Teenage Years

When Your Teen Just Quits: Diabetes and the Teenage Years The teenage years are a time of physical, mental, and emotional growth. Like all times of transition and change, the going can get rough at times. For teens with diabetes , diabetes and its care can be one of the rough spots. Just as the changes happening in their bodies make maintaining blood glucose control more challenging, teens are often expected to take more responsibility for managing their diabetes. At the same time, the increasing demands of school, the possibility of holding a job, and the opportunities for a wider social life can make diabetes care seem relatively unimportant in the teenage mind. With all of these competing demands and pressures, some teens quit taking care of themselves. When this happens, what is a parent to do? Understanding the global issues facing teenagers, as well as those particular to the teen in question, will help to address the problem. Heres what happened to two teenagers as they hit their mid- to late teens. Jessica is 15 and has had diabetes for 9 years. When she was much younger, her parents monitored her blood glucose levels, recorded the numbers, measured and supervised her food intake, and made frequent adjustments to her insulin doses. Her blood glucose levels were reasonable, and her HbA1c test results were usually under 8.0%. (The American Diabetes Association recommended goal for HbA1c, a measure of blood glucose control, is less than 7% for most people with diabetes.) Jessica never had a severe hypoglycemic episode that required treatment with glucagon (a hormone that raises blood glucose levels and that must be injected), and she only ever had ketones in her blood or urine when she was sick. (Ketones are acidic by-products of fat metabolism. Their appearance i Continue reading >>

Parenting Your Teen With Type 1 Diabetes

Parenting Your Teen With Type 1 Diabetes

By Nicole Kofman and Ashley Dartnell Twitter summary: Teenagers + type 1 diabetes = a challenge! Tips from #CWDFFL15 & a parent For most families, “‘adolescence is second only to infancy’ in terms of the upheaval it generates” within a household. Add managing type 1 diabetes into the mix, and things can get complicated. For parents, it can be daunting to balance giving teens space to grow and monitoring a 24/7 condition as dangerous as type 1 diabetes. At CWD’s Friends For Life conference in July, Dr. Jill Weissberg-Benchell and CDEs Natalie Bellini and Marissa Town led a workshop called “Parenting Your Teen with Type 1.” There, they elicited an impressive list of diabetes-specific concerns that parents have regarding their teens, including but not limited to: How can they have the peace of mind of knowing their child is reasonably within range without being a helicopter parent? What will happen when their teen begins to drive and could have a low? How do growth hormones interact with insulin and affect blood sugar? How will alcohol affect diabetes management? What additional steps do people with type 1 diabetes need to take to be prepared for college entrance exams? All that – on top of keeping up with schoolwork and extracurricular activities! We learned some great tips from the experts and parents at this workshop. Plus, we sat down with Ashley Dartnell, a parent of one of diaTribe’s summer associates who has type 1 diabetes, to learn more about her personal experience parenting a teen with type 1 and to gain a unique perspective outside of what we learned from the Friends for Life workshop. Our top five actionable tips for caring for a teen with diabetes 1. Numbers are not a scoreboard. As the all-star team of facilitators shared at the FFL worksho Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens

Diabetes In Children And Teens

Until recently, the common type of diabetes in children and teens was type 1. It was called juvenile diabetes. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose,or sugar, get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much sugar stays in the blood. Now younger people are also getting type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes. But now it is becoming more common in children and teens, due to more obesity. With Type 2 diabetes, the body does not make or use insulin well. Children have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if they are overweight or have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or are not active. Children who are African American, Hispanic, Native American/Alaska Native, Asian American, or Pacific Islander also have a higher risk. To lower the risk of type 2 diabetes in children Have them maintain a healthy weight Be sure they are physically active Have them eat smaller portions of healthy foods Limit time with the TV, computer, and video Children and teens with type 1 diabetes may need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes may be controlled with diet and exercise. If not, patients will need to take oral diabetes medicines or insulin. A blood test called the A1C can check on how you are managing your diabetes. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes develops gradually, but the symptoms may seem to come on suddenly. If you notice that you or your child have several of the symptoms listed below, make an appointment to see the doctor. Here’s why symptoms seem to develop suddenly: something triggers the development of type 1 diabetes (researchers think it’s a viral infection—read this article on what causes type 1 diabetes, and the body loses its ability to make insulin. However, at that point, there’s still insulin in the body so glucose levels are still normal. Over time, a decreasing amount of insulin is made in the body, but that can take years. When there’s no more insulin in the body, blood glucose levels rise quickly, and these symptoms can rapidly develop: Extreme weakness and/or tiredness Extreme thirst—dehydration Increased urination Abdominal pain Nausea and/or vomiting Blurry vision Wounds that don’t heal well Irritability or quick mood changes Changes to (or loss of) menstruation There are also signs of type 1 diabetes. Signs are different from symptoms in that they can be measured objectively; symptoms are experienced and reported by the patient. Signs of type 1 diabetes include: Weight loss—despite eating more Rapid heart rate Reduced blood pressure (falling below 90/60) Low body temperature (below 97º F) There is an overall lack of public awareness of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Making yourself aware of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes is a great way to be proactive about your health and the health of your family members. If you notice any of these signs or symptoms, it’s possible that you have (or your child has) type 1 diabetes. A doctor can make that diagnosis by checking blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Study Finds Teen Girls With Type 1 Diabetes Struggling More Than Boys

Study Finds Teen Girls With Type 1 Diabetes Struggling More Than Boys

Study Finds Teen Girls with Type 1 Diabetes Struggling More than Boys Researchers in a recent study found teen girls with type 1 diabetes to have much more negative illness perception than teen boys with type 1 diabetes. Researchers from Norways Oslo University Hospital were interested in finding out what psychological barriers hold back teenagers with type 1 diabetes from optimal insulin therapy. They focused on what gender differences may be involved and they focused on whether an insulin pump or an insulin pen was used. Gathering Data on Teens with Type 1 Diabetes The researchers sought 105 males and females between the ages of 12 and 20. They gave them two questionnaires regarding their illness perception and their beliefs about medicines. Specifically, they wanted to find out about insulin perceptions, insulin beliefs, and coping strategies. The participants were given an Adolescent Coping Orientation for Problem Experiences which they all completed. Clinical data was also collected by the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry. How Are Teen Boys and Girls Coping with Type 1 Diabetes? The teen girls with type 1 diabetes were overall found to have a much more negative view of their diabetesthan the boys. In the area regarding insulin beliefs, teen girls were much more concerned regarding insulin than the teen boys however,both teen boys and girls perceivedthe necessity of insulin equally. Teen girls did seem to do betterin some areas than the boysthey scored higher on coping strategies regarding being social and solving family problems. When it came tothe teensperception of diabetes management with insulin, regardless of gender, teens using an insulin pen reported more negative perceptions than those on an insulin pump. In the abstract of their published study, the Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (long-term) condition that occurs when your body doesn’t make enough insulin, or when your body has trouble using the insulin that it does make. About 1 in 400 young people have this condition. What is insulin? Why is it important? Insulin is a hormone made by a gland called the pancreas. The pancreas is located behind the stomach. Whenever you eat food, your body digests the food (breaks it down) into smaller parts: vitamins, minerals, sugar (called “glucose”), fat, and protein. Your body then uses glucose for energy. Glucose is the body’s major source of energy. Insulin is the hormone that helps glucose enter the cells of your body so it can be used as energy. If your body doesn’t make enough insulin, or if your body has difficulty using the insulin that it makes, the glucose from your food does not get changed into energy. Instead, the glucose stays in your blood, causing your blood glucose (also called “blood sugar”) to rise. Why is high blood sugar a problem? High blood sugar is a problem because it can cause serious damage to the body. Some of the most serious, long term problems are loss of vision, kidney problems, heart problems, damage to circulation and stroke. This kind of damage happens slowly over many years and can be delayed or prevented if you take good care of your diabetes. There are also short-term problems that come from high blood sugar. Some common short term-problems (caused from high blood sugar) are: Being thirsty Having to urinate (pee) more often Feeling irritable or exhausted Weight loss If your blood sugar gets too high due to not having enough insulin, you can experience a very serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Signs of ketoacidosis are: Rapid deep breathing Stomach pain or chest pain and/or Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

With more than a third of diabetes cases in the United States occurring in people over the age of 65, diabetes is often referred to as an age-related condition. But around 208,000 children and adolescents are estimated to have diabetes, and this number is increasing. Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of the condition among children and adolescents. A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that type 1 diabetes prevalence stands at 1.93 in every 1,000 children and adolescents, while type 2 diabetes affects 0.24 in every 1,000. In 2014, Medical News Today reported that, based on a study published in JAMA, rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased significantly among American children and teenagers. The study found that incidence of type 1 diabetes in children aged up to 9 years increased by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009, while incidence of type 2 diabetes among youths aged 10-19 years rose by 30.5 percent. The researchers note: "The increases in prevalence reported herein are important because such youth with diabetes will enter adulthood with several years of disease duration, difficulty in treatment, an increased risk of early complications and increased frequency of diabetes during reproductive years, which may further increase diabetes in the next generation." Contents of this article: Here are some key points about diabetes in children. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Type 1 and 2 diabetes are both increasing in the youth of America Often, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children develop over just a few weeks If type 1 diabetes is not spotted, the child can develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) What is diabetes in children? Type 1 diabetes in children, previously called juve Continue reading >>

How Does Puberty Affect Diabetes?

How Does Puberty Affect Diabetes?

One of the hardest things about being an adolescent is going through puberty and facing the challenges that it brings. The emotional roller coasters and the physical changes seem endless and impossible. But how does a teen go through puberty with diabetes? How are things different for them? The following article explores the relationship between puberty and diabetes. How does puberty affect Type 1 diabetes? During puberty, many physical changes occur that can affect one’s diabetes. Most importantly, the growth hormone causes lean body mass to double over in the 2 to 5 years during puberty. This increase in the growth hormone makes it harder for insulin to work in the body. That struggle is called insulin resistance. A normal child would just make more insulin, but a child with diabetes that does not make insulin or that has limited insulin must increase the amount of insulin that they give themselves to keep their blood sugar under control. This increase can be up to 30-50% more insulin than normal. Also, an earlier onset of puberty can lead to a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes in some girls because of the increase in estrogen that occurs during puberty. I recommend reading the following articles: Signs and symptoms of diabetes as an adolescent Due to hormones, puberty is the most common time for the onset of Type 1 diabetes. Adolescents have the same signs and symptoms as other ages for diabetes: Weight loss Excessive thirst Increased appetite Elevated levels of ketones in the blood or urine Elevated levels of glucose in the blood or urine To be diagnosed with diabetes, these symptoms will need to have been experienced for several weeks. If the individual is underweight or of a normal weight, then Type 1 diabetes is suspected. If they are overweight, it could then be ei Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Teenagers To Live Well With Type 1 Diabetes

10 Tips For Teenagers To Live Well With Type 1 Diabetes

Twitter Summary: @asbrown1 shares his top 10 tips for living w/ #T1D, straight from presentation to 100+ teens at #CWDFFL15 At the Children with Diabetes Friends For Life Conference this month, I had the incredible opportunity to speak to ~100 teenagers with diabetes. My talk, “10 Tips for Living Well with Type 1,” was a lot of fun to put together, and our team thought diaTribe readers might be interested in seeing it. I agonized over how to present this so that it wouldn’t come across as a lecture – even my teenage self would not react well to some of the advice (“Sleep seven hours a night? Hah! I have sports plus exams plus the next level to beat in Halo 3!”). I concluded that the best thing I could do was make this session a conversation, but ground it in lessons I’ve learned over time. Thankfully, I also had the amazing FFL staff by my side to help guide the discussion. The session reminded me of something that I intuitively know but often forget: each person’s diabetes is completely different, and what works for me won’t work for everyone. And equally important, what works for me may change over time – it certainly has since I was a teenager. I’m sharing the slides below in case they’re useful, but my biggest hope is that it gets you thinking about your own diabetes. What motivates you? What drags you down? What can you do better today? Who can you reach out to for support? Let us what you think by email or on Twitter. As the oldest of six kids, I had a lot of responsibility from a young age, and my Mom was also a very hands-off parent; both helped me take the reins of my diabetes from an early age. I hope everyone can find the right balance between taking care of their own diabetes, but also relying on their parents for support when needed. Continue reading >>

The Most Common Causes Of Diabetes In Teenage Girls

The Most Common Causes Of Diabetes In Teenage Girls

The Most Common Causes of Diabetes in Teenage Girls The number of individuals who are affected by diabetes mellitus is on a rise especially in the case of teenage girls. Caused due to high blood sugar levels, this ailment is on the rise since 1990s. The two main varieties of this ailment are Type 1 and Type 2 both of which occur in teenage girls. Both these ailments have different symptoms that occur due to the lack of insulin production. They normally range from changes in appetite to life threatening complications. Teenage girls suffering from type 1 diabetes have a genetic predisposition which makes the occurrence of this ailment more common. In spite of several researches, it is still unknown as to why certain individuals have this genetic predisposition where the immune system damages the insulin thereby leading to this ailment. As per research, there has to be a trigger that signals the beginning of this pancreas damaging process. It can be an environmental factor the cause of which is still far from being understood. The trigger is different in case of different teenage girls. Once the process starts, the body stops producing insulin and thus our body gets more susceptible to infections that begin to attack the pancreas. Signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes in Teenage Girls: In case of type 1 diabetes, there is a rise in blood glucose level. Generally it to 5 to 10 times higher than the normal level. The excess glucose gets mixed with the urine which in turn leads to frequent urination and dehydration. There is an increased desire to drink water at almost all the times. Mood swings and excessive tiredness are quite common. Due to the ailment, the body starts to break down the fat and but fails to utilize all the nutrients and minerals thereby leading to weight Continue reading >>

Why A Teen With Type 1 Diabetes Lied To Her Parents

Why A Teen With Type 1 Diabetes Lied To Her Parents

Why a Teen with Type 1 Diabetes Lied to her Parents Why a Teen with Type 1 Diabetes Lied to her Parents The first time I lied to my parents about my blood sugar is still a crystal clear memory for me. I was twelve years old and participating in a swim meet at our local beach club. My mom yelled across the pool, Lauren, its time for you to check! I groaned and dragged my feet as I made my way over to my back pack in my usual cubby. I took out my meter, looked around, and then did something new: I put it right back. I paused a moment, then yelled across the pool to my mom: Im 121! She gave me a thumbs up and a smile and went back to helping time the races. I didnt know it at the time, but that would be the beginning of a near seven year struggle for me with diabetes burn out. Now that Im on the other side of it, I can share my feelings about what I did what I did and why I did it for so long. The reason I lied the first time at my swim meet was so very simple. I was just plain sick of checking my blood sugar. I thought, whats the harm in skipping?. The reward is I can pretend diabetes isnt there. I started off as just lying about my blood sugars, then it turned into lying about giving myself insulin, there was even a phase when I would take my pump off for periods of time without taking any injections. I realized even then that my behavior was destructive, but I cannot tell you how nice it was to just eat a meal without the bru-ha-ha of doing so with diabetes. The freedom of being able to just not deal with diabetes is incredibly liberating and, unfortunately, severely addictive. One might argue that feeling terrible all the time isnt worth the freedom of not having to do all those tedious tasks, and I can agree with you now, but back then, it was worth it for me. Being Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Teen Diabetes

Symptoms Of Teen Diabetes

The number of people affected by diabetes mellitus, a disease that causes abnormal blood sugar levels, has been increasing worldwide in all age groups, including teenagers, since the mid-1990s. The two main types of diabetes mellitus -- type 1 and type 2 -- can occur in teenagers, yet often they cause very different symptoms. Both types of diabetes are related to insulin, a hormone that helps move sugar from the blood to the body's cells. Symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are caused by inadequate insulin activity in the body, either due to lack of insulin production or resistance of the body to using insulin. These symptoms range from subtle appetite changes to life-threatening complications. Video of the Day Type 1 Symptoms In type 1 diabetes, the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas have been largely destroyed. In the absence of insulin, blood sugar becomes too high because it cannot be ushered into the cells to use for energy. This produces the classic diabetes symptoms -- increased thirst, increased appetite and frequent urination. In addition, despite eating more, teens with type 1 diabetes often lose weight in the weeks before being diagnosed, largely due to dehydration but also as a result of loss of muscle and body fat. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes in teens usually occur over several weeks before being checked by a physician. While symptoms of high blood sugars may be more severe at diagnosis, they can occur any time the blood sugars are abnormally high. In type 1 diabetes, the body’s lack of insulin prevents the use of sugar for energy. As the body instead turns to fat for energy, ketones are produced. This causes the body to become very dehydrated and acidic, leading to a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. Symptoms of DKA include wei Continue reading >>

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Children?

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Children?

Years ago, it was rare to hear about a child with type 2 diabetes. Doctors used to think kids only got type 1. It was even called juvenile diabetes for a long time. Not anymore. Now, according to the CDC, more than 208,000 people younger than 20 have this disease. That number includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Here's what you need to know if your child is diagnosed. You've probably heard diabetes and high blood sugar mentioned together. Here's what happens. Your digestive system breaks down carbohydrates into a type of sugar called glucose. Your pancreas creates a hormone, known as insulin, that moves glucose from your blood into your cells, where it’s used for fuel. In type 2 diabetes, the cells in your child's body don’t respond to the insulin, and glucose builds up in her bloodstream. This is called insulin resistance. Eventually, the sugar levels in her body get too high for it to handle. That could lead to other conditions in the future, like heart disease, blindness, and kidney failure. Type 2 diabetes is most likely to affect kids who are: Girls Overweight Have a family history of diabetes American Indian, African-American, Asian, or Hispanic/Latino Have a problem called insulin resistance The single biggest cause of type 2 diabetes in children is extra weight. In the U.S., nearly 1 out of every 3 children is overweight. Once a child gets too heavy, she’s twice as likely to get diabetes. One or more of these things may contribute to extra weight or obesity: Unhealthy eating Family members (alive or dead) who've been overweight Rarely, a hormone problem or other medical condition As with adults, type 2 diabetes is more likely to affect children who carry extra weight around the middle. At first, there may be no symptoms. Over time, you may notice: Hun Continue reading >>

When 'normal Teen' Stuff Is A Warning Sign Of Illness: What Parents Should Know

When 'normal Teen' Stuff Is A Warning Sign Of Illness: What Parents Should Know

Editor's Note: This story was first published on August 15, 2016. Stacey Crescitelli is parenting her third teenager after successfully steering daughters Anna, 19, and Sophia, 18, to adulthood. So when her third child, Henry, now 14, began growing at at a fast pace, sleeping more and thinning out, she and her husband Joe thought he was just being a typical teen. As it turns out, his body was actually fighting something more sinister than teenage hormones: Type 1 diabetes. Now, Crescitelli wants other parents of teenagers to know about the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes. But how can parents tell the difference between what is normal and what is not when it comes to teens? Stacey Crescitelli Never miss a parenting story with TODAY’s newsletters! Sign up here Crescitelli, 46, noticed that since December, Henry had grown a lot, "maybe four or five inches," she told TODAY Parents, "and his body was changing. He has always been kind of a solid boy with a large frame — never one of those reed thin, gangly boys — but suddenly, he was becoming one," she said, "and of course, we thought he was simply 'leaning out,'" she said. Though Henry continued to lose weight and began to sleep more, it was not until this past March that the Doylestown, Pennsylvania, mother noticed symptoms that did not fit with what she believed was normal for teenage boys. That was when Henry suffered from a sudden bout of vertigo that "terrified him and mystified us," said Crescitelli. Related story: State legislator riles up 'army of fierce moms' with diabetes comment "One minute he was in the kitchen getting water, and the next he was asking me to help him to the couch because he couldn't walk or focus his eyes," she said. The vertigo lasted for a day, but it was the beginning of more new symptoms: f Continue reading >>

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