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Diabetes In Nova Scotia

Canadian Diabetes Strategy Projects In Nova Scotia

Canadian Diabetes Strategy Projects In Nova Scotia

Bridging the Divide: Improving Psychosocial Management of Atlantic Canadians with Diabetes Queen Elizabeth II Behaviour Change Institute Bridging the Divide: Improving Psychosocial Management of Atlantic Canadians with Diabetes The goals of this project are to educate health care personnel in Newfoundland and Labrador regarding the early detection and proper treatment of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) and educate families with children living with Type 1 Diabetes about the prevention of DKA. The knowledge acquired through this project will improve the medical care of children, prevent cases of DKA from occurring and reduce the suffering of pediatric DKA. Bridging the Gaps: A Collaborative Approach to Diabetes in Atlantic Canada The goal of this project is to gather diabetes stakeholders from the Atlantic Provinces to share information and best practices, identify gaps in services and address priorities for diabetes care in Atlantic Canada. It is expected that the recommendations developed through this project will influence health policy and health care models and result in improved screening, early detection and diabetes management practices in Atlantic Canada. This project will facilitate links among diabetes healthcare professionals, government representatives, diabetes related health charities, at-risk populations and people living with diabetes throughout the Atlantic Provinces and identify areas to collaboratively address the complex issues surrounding diabetes. Diabetes Screening, Detection and Self-Management - Tools & Approaches The goal of this project is to empower vulnerable and marginalized populations to improve their health in relation to diabetes and related chronic diseases by identifying and applying the most effective tools and approaches for screening, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Canada: Nova Scotia - Home | Facebook

Diabetes Canada: Nova Scotia - Home | Facebook

on. I've been donating gorgeous clothes and household items for a long time now. I'm in the process of moving and scheduled a pickup at my house for a large amoun...t of clothing and household items. I had to wait almost 2 weeks for them to pick it up. I left instructio was on our back doorstep. Came home, nothing was picked up. Called them to ask why - they said the driver didn't see anything. I told them I left instructio was out back. She made a note on file and to the driver that during their next pick up, to make sure they go to the back step. Had to wait another week for the next pick up. Came home, nothing was taken for the second time! Called back yet again and I was told she saw the note on file that pick up instructio ns were left for the driver to pick everything up on the back step but that they don't have permission to enter people's back yards. I said, "the two other people I spoke with said it was no problem because I gave permission to do so" and she agreed. She put an "emergency " request in to have a driver pick it up asap and that someone would be in touch with me right away. I haven't heard a word in 3 days. I said I'm moving in 4 days and this stuff needs to go. They must not need the donations that badly afterall! Here's a suggestion g claiming how easy it is to have someone pick up your used goods, hire more drivers to actually pick items up in a timely fashion and read notes on the file! What a joke. See More Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care Program Of Nova Scotia: Celebrating 25 Years Of Improving Diabetes Care In Nova Scotia - Sciencedirect

Diabetes Care Program Of Nova Scotia: Celebrating 25 Years Of Improving Diabetes Care In Nova Scotia - Sciencedirect

Get rights and content The Diabetes Care Program of Nova Scotia (DCPNS)s mission is to improve, through leadership and partnerships, the health of Nova Scotians living with, affected by, or at risk of developing diabetes. Working together with local, provincial and national partners, the DCPNS has improved and standardized diabetes care in Nova Scotia over the past 25 years by developing and deploying a resourceful and collaborative program model. This article describes the model and highlights its key achievements. With balanced representation from frontline providers through to senior decision makers in health care, the DCPNS works across the age continuum, supporting the implementation of national clinical practice guidelines and, when necessary, developing provincial guidelines to meet local needs. The development and implementation of standardized documentation and data collection tools in all diabetes centres created a robust opportunity for the development and expansion of the DCPNS registry. This registry provides useful clinical and statistical information to staff, providers within the circle of care, management and senior leadership. Data are used to support individual care, program planning, quality improvement and business planning at both the local and the provincial levels. The DCPNS supports the sharing of new knowledge and advances through continuous education for providers. The DCPNS's ability to engage diabetes educators and key physician champions has ensured balanced perspectives in the creation of tools and resources that can be effective in real-world practice. The DCPNS has evolved to become an illustrative example of the chronic care model in action. La mission du Programme de soins aux diabtiques de la Nouvelle-cosse (DCPNS, de l'anglais Diabe Continue reading >>

Cancer, Diabetes Rates Higher In First Nations Communities In Nova Scotia

Cancer, Diabetes Rates Higher In First Nations Communities In Nova Scotia

Cancer, diabetes rates higher in First Nations communities in Nova Scotia By Rhonda Brown Supervising Producer Global News Mi'kmaq chiefs sign a health data sharing agreement on March 25, 2016. New data being compiled in Nova Scotia shows the rates for some chronic illnesses and disease are much higher in Mikmaq people than in the general population of the province. The information is part of a new provincial health registry, know as the First Nations Client Linkage Registry, the first of its kind in Canada. Its a joint project of First Nations chiefs, the province and Health Canada. READ MORE: How can Canada make an inquiry on missing, murdered women successful? For many years, our communities lacked critical information about the health of our people, said Chief Andrea Paul of the Pictou Landing First Nation. We could not say with certainty how many of our people suffered from heart disease or cancer, or how many women were regularly screened for breast cancer. The data shows, for example, that overall cancer rates among First Nations communities are close to the general rate of cancer in the province; however, the rate of lung cancers are much higher. Breast cancer rates are also similar, but more Mikmaq women are dying. One reason for this could be because we arent finding the disease early enough when it is most likely to be curable, said Chief Paul. Only 36.5 of the women in our communities who should be going for breast screening actually do, and this number has been going down in recent years. The much higher rate of diabetes among Mikmaq people is startling. Overall, the diabetes rate in First Nations communities is two times higher than in the general population in Nova Scotia For those between the ages of 59 and 69, the rate is three times higher, while its Continue reading >>

Lets Talk Informatics! Diabetes Care Program Of Nova Scotia Registry

Lets Talk Informatics! Diabetes Care Program Of Nova Scotia Registry

Lets Talk Informatics! Diabetes Care Program of Nova Scotia Registry Nova Scotia Gerontological Nurses Association Dinner, Education Sessions, & Annual General Meeting The Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) Information Management & Technology team is pleased to welcomePeggy Dunbar and Robin Read from theDiabetes Care Programof Nova Scotia as our guest speakers for thenextLets Talk Informaticsevent onThursday, June 28th, 2018, 7:30 8:30 a.m.: More thana Registry Making Life EasierImproving Data QualityEffecting Practice Change. Lets Talk Informaticsis a monthly Informatics Grand Rounds series dedicated to exploring the use of information technology in health care to transform patient care and drive clinical outcomes. Theseries is approved by Digital Health Canada (formerly Coach Canada) as a Continuing Education Provider enabling participants to claim 1CE hour for each presentation attended. It is also certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Nova Scotia Chapter for one Mainpro+ credit by providing content aimed at improving computer skills as applied to learning and access to information. Event Details & Registration . For more information aboutLets Talk Informatics, please visit or email [email protected] . Continue reading >>

Implementation Of Resources To Support Patient Physical Activity Through Diabetes Centres In Nova Scotia: The Effectiveness Of Enhanced Support For Exercise Participation.

Implementation Of Resources To Support Patient Physical Activity Through Diabetes Centres In Nova Scotia: The Effectiveness Of Enhanced Support For Exercise Participation.

Diabetes Care Program of Nova Scotia, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of enhancing support for physical activity counselling and exercise participation at diabetes centres in Nova Scotia on physical activity and exercise behaviours and clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In all, 180 patients at 8 diabetes centres participated in this observational study. A range of enhanced supports for exercise were offered at these centres. A kinesiologist was added to the diabetes care team to primarily provide extra physical activity counselling and exercise classes. Patient physical activity and exercise levels, efficacy perceptions and mean glycated hemoglobin (A1C) were evaluated at baseline and 6months. We compared changes in these variables for patients who participated in the enhanced supports versus patients who did not. Participants who attended exercise classes (n=46), increased moderate physical activity by 27% and doubled resistance exercise participation (1.01.8 to 2.02.1days per week) whereas those who did not attend exercise classes (n=49) reduced moderate physical activity by 26% and did not change resistance exercise participation (interactions, p=0.04 and p=0.07, respectively). Patients who received resistance band instruction (n=15) from a kinesiologist had reductions in A1C (from 7.51.4 to 7.11.2; p=0.04), whereas other subgroups did not have significant changes in A1C. Offering enhanced support for exercise at diabetes centres produced improvements in physical activity and exercise in type 2 diabetes patients. Resistance band instruction from a kinesiologist combined with participating in a walking and resistance training program improved glycemic control, which underscores the i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Toolkit | Pharmacy Association Of Nova Scotia

Diabetes Toolkit | Pharmacy Association Of Nova Scotia

Examples of what can be found in this link: Meal planning and how to shop: Read the latest edition of Pharmacy Life, the official newsletter of the Pharmacy Association of Nova Scotia Read More The Nova Scotia Take Home Naloxone Program launched today. Visit to find out more about the program and where to get a kit. Read More The April - June 2018 Report is now available. Read More The 2017 Wage and Benefits survey results are now available. Read More @PharmacyNS: We have a fantastic line-up of education sessions for the #NSPHARMCONF . Check them out at @PharmacyNS: #QuickTipTuesday Planning to travel but have #arthritis ? Here are a few #tips . Book smart so that you have easy to @PharmacyNS: RT @ChooseWiselyNS : Are you a pharmacist interested in the Choosing Wisely campaign? Check out the CWC presentation: "Pharmacists Embra Continue reading >>

Clothesline - Diabetes Canada - Nova Scotia Region

Clothesline - Diabetes Canada - Nova Scotia Region

Please call or visit the website to schedule pick up of donations or to find out where the closest donation centre is located Here at 211 , our goal every day is to provide the highest possible quality of service. If you tell us how we did today, well be able to work even harder at meeting this goal. Will you help by answering 4 short questions at the end of your visit? Did you find the information you were looking for? I did not visit the 211 site to find specific information Are you seeking information on behalf of: Did you find new information on the 211 site that you did not know about before? Yes - I learned about a service I did not know about before Yes - I learned new information about a service I was already familiar with Thank you for visiting our site. Please tell us about your experience by checking one of the following boxes: I came to the site to find resources and found what I was looking for. I came to the site to find resources and I didnt find what I was looking for. Please dial 2-1-1 now and a team member will be happy to help you. Continue reading >>

Jdrf Applauds The Government Of Nova Scotias Commitment In Funding An Insulin Pump Program For Nova Scotians Living With Type 1 Diabetes

Jdrf Applauds The Government Of Nova Scotias Commitment In Funding An Insulin Pump Program For Nova Scotians Living With Type 1 Diabetes

JDRF Applauds the Government of Nova Scotias Commitment in Funding an Insulin Pump Program for Nova Scotians Living with Type 1 Diabetes JDRF Applauds the Government of Nova Scotias Commitment in Funding an Insulin Pump Program for Nova Scotians Living with Type 1 Diabetes JDRF Applauds the Government of Nova Scotias Commitment in Funding an Insulin Pump Program for Nova Scotians Living with Type 1 Diabetes TORONTO (April 4, 2013) JDRF applauds the Government of Nova Scotias commitment in the 2013 Provincial Budget to fund an insulin pump program for eligible Nova Scotians living with type 1 diabetes (T1D). T1D is an autoimmune disease in which a persons pancreas stops producing insulin, a hormone that enables people to get energy from food. Its onset has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle. Affecting over 300,000 Canadians, T1D can occur at any age, leaving children and adults dependent on injected or pumped insulin for life. The number of people living with T1D is increasing by three to five percent annually - the greatest rise being in children aged five to nine years. Insulin pump technology provides precise insulin delivery continuously day and night, helping individuals maintain glucose levels between meals, during exercise and overnight. Studies have shown that people living with T1D who use insulin pump therapy experience fewer complications and live longer, healthier lives. In fact, a better managed blood glucose regimen has been proven to reduce the number of heart, kidney and eye-related diabetes complications. By investing in insulin pump therapy in the short-term, we can take steps to lessen or prevent complications from developing later in life, which can result in savings for health care systems in the long-term. We commend the Government of Nova Scotia Continue reading >>

D-camps - Camp Lion Maxwell

D-camps - Camp Lion Maxwell

Camp Lion Maxwell, originally named Camp Atlantic, was founded in 1964 with an inaugural program of 23 campers from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. In 1997, the camp was renamed after Lion Peter Maxwell of Truro, in recognition of the tremendous support the Lions Clubs of Nova Scotia have provided the camp. For the past 10 years, Camp Lion Maxwell has called Camp Kadimah, in Barss Corner, home. Situated on beautiful Lake William in Lunenburg County, camp has a spacious waterfront, large playing fields, a comfortable dining hall and lots of program options. Campers stay in rustic cabins in groups of up to 10. Each cabin has one washroom with toilets and sinks. Showers are located in a shared space within the dining hall. There is storage space under each bunk and shelves for campers small items. Clotheslines are located outside the cabins in order to dry out towels and bathing suits. Each cabin has two counsellors who travel with and supervise campers 24 hours a day. The Camp Lion Maxwell health-care team comes to us from: Diabetes education clinics across Nova Scotia All departments within the Nova Scotia Health Authority Diabetes educators, nurses, physicians, registered dietitians and medical students make up this wonderful group and are part of the cabin team. Our art program helps campers explore their creative side, expand their knowledge of art techniques and history, all while using the beautiful setting of Camp Lion Maxwell for inspiration. The Electives Program is designed to let your camper participate in activities that are unique and provide a different set of challenges than those listed above. Campers get to choose these activities individually. Some past examples include: yoga, mad scientist and pottery. Our specialty overnight program prepares our older Continue reading >>

What Is The A1c Test?

What Is The A1c Test?

The A1C (“A-one-C”) is a blood test that checks your average blood sugar over the past 3 months. This average is different from your day to day blood sugar. There are 3 reasons to check your A1C: · To diagnose prediabetes · To diagnose diabetes · To see how well you are controlling your blood sugar Sugar absorbed from your food goes into the bloodstream. The sugar sticks to the hemoglobin protein in red blood cells, forming hemoglobin A1C. The A1C stays in the blood for the life of the red blood cell, which is 90 to 120 days. This means that the amount of A1C in your blood reflects how high your blood sugar has been over the past 3 months. Another name for this test is hemoglobin A1C test. It is different from a regular blood sugar or blood glucose test. WHY IS THIS TEST DONE? A1C is an excellent way to check how well you are controlling your blood sugar over a 3-month period. A1C tests are important because: · They can check the accuracy of the blood sugar results you get at home. · They help predict your risk of diabetic complications. The higher the A1C percentage, the greater your risk of serious problems from diabetes, like eye, kidney, blood vessel, or nerve damage. If your A1C is high, your diabetes plan will need to be changed. HOW DO I PREPARE FOR THIS TEST? You don’t need to do anything to prepare for this test. One of the advantages of this test is that you do not have to fast before you take it. HOW IS THE TEST DONE? A small amount of blood is taken from a vein in your arm with a needle. The blood is collected in tubes and sent to a lab. Having this test will take just a few minutes of your time. At some pharmacies you may be able to buy a device that allows you to test A1C at home. You may find that the results of the home test are not the same a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Jobs In Nova Scotia (with Salaries) | Indeed.com

Diabetes Jobs In Nova Scotia (with Salaries) | Indeed.com

One hundred percent of net proceeds directly supports Diabetes Canada and helps send more than 2,500 children and youth with Type 1 diabetes to Diabetes Canada... One hundred percent of net proceeds directly supports Diabetes Canada and helps send more than 2,500 children and youth with Type 1 diabetes to Diabetes Canada... Diabetes Care in Action. A proudly Canadian retail company, Sobeys began in 1907 as a small meat delivery business in Stellarton, Nova Scotia.... O Offering health promotion and prevention activities, for example, training people to use devices such as blood pressure or diabetes monitors.... Nutrition promotion - grocery store tours identifying healthy choices and how to read nutrition labels (topics include diabetes, cardiovascular health, food... The network provides chronic disease and wellness programs including diabetes management, self-management and nutrition education.... Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) 40 reviews Strong supports for internal medicine care include a nurse practitioner-led heart function clinic, a cardiac rehabilitation program, and an excellent diabetes... In addition to working alongside the collaborating physician, the Nurse Practitioner will work with the broader health care team that includes community health... Collaborates on the management of Members with stable chronic illnesses (such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and asthma) through a predetermined... Charger et dcharger de la marchandise; Utiliser des cartes routires et autres articles d'aide de planification de voyage; Inspecter les camions avant,... We have removed 1 job posting very similar to those already shown. To see the additional result, you may repeat your search with the omitted job posting included . Post your resume - It only takes a few Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Type 1 811.novascotia.ca

Diabetes: Type 1 811.novascotia.ca

Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong disorder that happens when your body stops making insulin. When you dont have insulin, the level of sugar in your body blood gets too high. When you digest food, your body breaks down much of the food into sugar (glucose). Your blood carries the sugar to your cells for energy. Insulin made by the pancreas gland moves the sugar from the bloodstream into the cells. When your pancreas stops making insulin, sugar cannot get into your cells. Sugar then builds up in the blood. Too much sugar in the blood can cause many problems. These problems can be life-threatening if they are not treated. However, treatment with insulin can control your blood sugar level. Type 1 diabetes usually starts in childhood or early adulthood. When you have type 1 diabetes, you will need to take insulin for the rest of your life (unless you have a pancreas cell transplant). Type 1 diabetes is also called type 1 diabetes mellitus or juvenile diabetes. It used to be called insulin-dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes happens when most or all of the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been injured or destroyed. Usually the exact cause is not known. Sometimes the diabetes may happen because of a viral infection or because the pancreas has been injured. Or it may result from an immune system disorder, which is when the body sees part of itself as foreign and attacks itin this case, attacking the pancreas. Symptoms may start suddenly or they may develop over days to weeks. Symptoms vary widely from person to person. Common symptoms include: If diabetes is not diagnosed and treated, you could develop a life-threatening problem called ketoacidosis and possibly go into a coma and die. Your healthcare provider will ask about your medical history and your symptoms and ex Continue reading >>

Can I Get Help To Pay For My Diabetes Medications And Supplies?

Can I Get Help To Pay For My Diabetes Medications And Supplies?

Government of Canada activities and initiatives Funding: Call for Concepts to Increase awareness and take-up of the Canada Learning Bond. Continue reading >>

Children's Diabetes Camp In P.e.i. To Close, Merge With One In Nova Scotia

Children's Diabetes Camp In P.e.i. To Close, Merge With One In Nova Scotia

Children's diabetes camp in P.E.I. to close, merge with one in Nova Scotia The younger children, ages 7-10, from the Cavendish and Bedeque bunks play Gaga Ball at Camp Red Fox in Canoe Cove in this file photo. Diabetes Canada has announced it is closing the diabetes camps in P.E.I. and New Brunswick and merging them with the camp in Nova Scotia. - The Guardian CANOE COVE, P.E.I. - A former camper and instructor at a P.E.I. camp for children with type 1 diabetes said he frustrated and sad the national organization has shut them down. Anthony Millar of Tyne Valley said staff got a letter last week from Diabetes Canada informing them that Camp Red Fox in Canoe Cove in P.E.I. and Camp Dia-Best at Green Hill Lake, N.B., will close and the children will instead be sent to Barss Corner, N.S. The camp is for children ages seven to 14. It was frustrating and saddening, Millar said. We understand that it was probably a financial decision. It is known that more organizations are having a harder time fundraising money but its more . . . feeling bad for the parents because now they have to leave the Island to have this opportunity and a lot of them are already voicing their concerns. Its been an institution on our Island for quite a long time so its not something we just had for a few years and just died off. Its been around forever and the numbers keep rising. Jamie Gamble and Rocky Rankin decorate watering cups in their gardening class at Camp Red Fox in Canoe Cove in this file photo. Diabetes Canada has announced it is closing the diabetes camps in P.E.I. and New Brunswick and merging them with the camp in Nova Scotia. Millar said parents arent concerned about any lack of medical attention but are worried about the sheer distance between communities in P.E.I. and Barss Corner, l Continue reading >>

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