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Diabetes In Michigan Update

My Aade Network : Michigan Cb 2017 Fall Conference - Diabetes Care: From Research To Practice : Event Details

My Aade Network : Michigan Cb 2017 Fall Conference - Diabetes Care: From Research To Practice : Event Details

- 3 Queen rooms w/ 2 queen beds ($94/ night) +taxes and fees - 4 Queen Suites w/ 2 queen beds and a pullout couch ($129/ night) +taxes and fees - 8 King Studios w/ 1 king bed and a pullout couch ($119/ night) + taxes and fees Ask for the AADE Diabetes Conference group rate PLEASE BOOK YOUR HOTEL ROOM ASAP TO ENSURE THE LOWEST RATE! Program description: Diabetes Educators are faced with staying current on growing research and new guidelines in diabetes care. There is a need to understand and effectively translate updates in nutritional and pharmaceutical interventions to different practice settings and diverse diabetes populations. All sessions presented at this conference aim to address this knowledge gap. Learning Outcome: To enhance the knowledge and skill set of health care professionals practicing in a variety of practice settings. Target Audience: Registered Nurses, Registered Dietitians, Pharmacists, Care Managers Identify and understand new pharmaceuticals for diabetes. Understand the importance and impact of population health. Implement updates in neuropathy screening and treatment. Explain the impact of psychosocial related issues in diabetes. Implement updates in nutritional treatment of obesity. Requirements for Successful Completion: For successful completion, participants are required to be in attendance in the full activity, complete and submit the program evaluation at the conclusion of the educational event. This program provides 6 contact hours of continuing education credit. American Association of Diabetes Educators Provider is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. American Association of Diabetes Educators (AM001) is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or olderwith diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of theseven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes,may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has been strongly associated with insulin Continue reading >>

Chelsea Update: Chelsea, Michigan, News

Chelsea Update: Chelsea, Michigan, News

Be part of the solution: help Chelsea Lions fight diabetes File photo of Chelsea Lions Club members. Diabetes is the greatest cause of blindness in the U.S. and half of those with diabetes do not know they have it. The Chelsea Lions Club needs new members to help prevent diabetes caused blindness. Please visit club members at a health screening booth at the Chelsea Spring Expo on Saturday, April 14 at the Washington Street Education Center. In addition, the Lions will have an informational session on the Defense Against Diabetes (DAD) program onWednesday, April 18,at 6:30 p.m. at the front banquet room of the Arctic Breakaway Restaurant on the second level of the Arctic Coliseum located at 501 Coliseum Dr. The Lions Clubs of Michigan are currently raising $200,000 to purchase equipment, conduct screenings, identify at-risk people, conduct nutritional education sessions and provide assistance to diabetics in the state. The Chelsea Lions and the Community Health Improvement Department of St. Joseph Mercy Hospital are forming a steering committee on deploying the Lions Club Defense Against Diabetes program in the greater Chelsea area. As part of their commitment to identifying and assisting diabetics, the Chelsea Lions recently agreed to purchase and supply a Siemens A1C Glucose Test Meter to be used by the St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea Community Outreach. The meter and supplies were approximately $3,000. The meter can determine a persons average glucose level during the last 90 days. The Lions provide sight screening, glucose tolerance screening and blood pressure screening at community events. In addition, the Lions will be assisting the St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea staff in their community service projects. You can be part of the solution. The Lions Club needs civic minded wome Continue reading >>

Perl Study

Perl Study

The PERL Study is a clinical trial designed to test whether the medication allopurinol can prevent or slow down kidney disease in people with type 1 diabetes. 530 people with type 1 diabetes are now participating in PERL. In PERL, kidney function is measured periodically to see if this treatment is effective. All study-related tests are provided at no charge. Individuals who were 18-70 years old, had type 1 diabetes for at least 8 years, and had early signs of decreased kidney function on blood and/or urine tests were recruited and are currently participating in the study.From these over 500 participants, about 34% are female and 66% are male, average age is 51 years old and they have had type 1 diabetes for about 34 years. Patients are participating from several locations across 3 countries: US, Canada, and Denmark. The investigators and the whole PERL team are very fortunate in having such a committed group of study participants. You can continue collaborating in many ways, including: communicating with the study personnel if any issues or concerns arise Without your active participation, there is no study, and we will not be able to determine whether or not this therapy can help patients with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Helping Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Helping Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Helping parents of children with type 1 diabetes Contact(s): Katharine Murray Advertising and Public Relations office: (517) 884-8892 [email protected] Bree Holtz, assistant professor in the Department of Advertising and Public Relations , and her team have received a Science and Society at State award totaling $10,000 to develop and test a website portal for parents of children with type 1 diabetes. According to Holtz, the portal will provide information on positive parent communication and problem solving skills. Additional portal information will include how to educate and communicate with secondary caregivers (schools, coaches, etc.), current diabetes research through trusted websites and resources on treatment options. The portal will also connect to a private and moderated Facebook group for parents of children with type 1 diabetes. Caring for a child with type 1 diabetes is extremely demanding and stressful for the entire family, Holtz said. The parents take most of the responsibility for disease management and this can cause additional strain on their emotional and physical well-being. This portal aims to alleviate some of that strain by providing a reliable and supportive space for information and advice. This team perfectly encapsulates our mission to promote interdisciplinary collaboration on MSUs campus, said Georgina Montgomery, director of Science and Society at State. We anticipate this project will contribute to innovation through the collaboration between the colleges of Communication Arts and Sciences and Nursing, as well as Human Development and Family Studies and MSU Extension, and into the health community. Holtzs team consists of specialists in the field of diabetes and communication and includes Shelia Cotten, Department of Media and Information; Continue reading >>

5 Reasons To Join The Diabetes Prevention Program

5 Reasons To Join The Diabetes Prevention Program

(Not sure if youre at risk for prediabetes? Take this one minute quiz .) Joyce Patterson, a nutrition specialist at Michigan Medicines Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Diabetes (MEND), has been a Diabetes Prevention Program coach for the past two years. Heres what she has to say about the program. The main focus is on how and why we make choices Patterson said that while participants learn a lot about the nuts and bolts about how food and physical activity affect blood sugar, the bulk of the program is about how and why we make choices in our daily lives. We learn not just about preventing diabetes, but we learn a lot about ourselves, and thats what really clicks for people, she said. Participants support and learn from one another In every class I have led, participants have developed a bond early and are grateful to learn from each other, Patterson said. Participants share successes and failures together and move toward goals as a group. Even after the program ends, graduates can drop in for a support group once a month. Within a couple of months, youll start to see real results Patterson said her favorite moment occurs three to four months into each class, when participants start going back to their health care providers. By that point theyve begun to make changes and lose weight, and their motivation is reinforced when they find their A1C values and cholesterol levels beginning to come down. She cited one doctor who told a recent participant about how well they did lowering their high blood pressure. Youll get new information you can actually use One great thing about this program is that you get reliable information about how food affects your health that you might not otherwise get until you were diagnosed with diabetes, Patterson said. A lot of people com Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Statistics Report

National Diabetes Statistics Report

The National Diabetes Statistics Report is a periodic publication of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that provides updated statistics about diabetes in the United States for a scientific audience. It includes information on prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs. These data can help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes across the United States. Note This publication is not subject to copyright restrictions; please duplicate and distribute copies as desired. Citation Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services; 2017. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathies: Update On Definitions, Diagnostic Criteria, Estimation Of Severity, And Treatments

Diabetic Neuropathies: Update On Definitions, Diagnostic Criteria, Estimation Of Severity, And Treatments

Preceding the joint meeting of the 19th annual Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (NEURODIAB) and the 8th International Symposium on Diabetic Neuropathy in Toronto, Canada, 13–18 October 2009, expert panels were convened to provide updates on classification, definitions, diagnostic criteria, and treatments of diabetic peripheral neuropathies (DPNs), autonomic neuropathy, painful DPNs, and structural alterations in DPNs. CLASSIFICATION AND DEFINITION OF DIABETIC NEUROPATHIES The neuropathies developing in patients with diabetes are known to be heterogenous by their symptoms, pattern of neurologic involvement, course, risk covariates, pathologic alterations, and underlying mechanisms (1,2). Thomas (3) and Boulton et al. (4) separated these into generalized and focal/multifocal varieties (e.g., multiple mononeuropathy, lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical radiculoplexus neuropathies) (3,4). It is known that similar patterns of neuropathy occur in patients without diabetes (2). Moreover, diabetic patients can develop chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy. The evidence that generalized varieties can be further classified into at least two major subgroups seems compelling (3,4). The typical DPN is a chronic, symmetrical, length-dependent sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN) and is thought to be the most common variety (1). It develops on (or with) a background of long-standing hyperglycemia, associated metabolic derangements (increased polyol flux, accumulation of advanced glycation end products, oxidative stress, and lipid alterations among other metabolic abnormalities) and cardiovascular risk factors (5–7). Alterations of microvessels, similar to those observed in diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, appea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. When these blood vessels are damaged, they may leak blood and grow fragile new vessels. When the nerve cells are damaged, vision is impaired. These changes can result in blurring of your vision, hemorrhage into your eye, or, if untreated, retinal detachment. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in the United States. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy, Testing, and Treatments Watch these video animations to learn more about diabeticretinopathy, the affect that the diabetic retinopathy has on the eyes,and tests and treatments options for the condition. The symptoms described above may not necessarily mean that you have diabetic retinopathy. However, if you experience one or more of these symptoms, contact your ophthalmologist for a complete exam. It is also important to note that pregnancy and high blood pressure may aggravate diabetic retinopathy. People with untreated diabetes are 25 times more at risk for blindness than the general population. The longer a person has had diabetes, the higher the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. Fortunately, with regular, proper eye care and treatment when necessary, the incidence of severe vision loss has been greatly reduced. If you have diabetes, your ophthalmologist can help to prevent serious vision problems. Diabetic retinopathy can cause vision loss in two ways: Macular Edema Macular edema is a condition where your retinal blood vessels develop tiny leaks. When this occurs, blood and fluid leak from the retinal blood vessels and fatty material (called exudate) is deposited in the retina. This causes swelling of the retina and is called diabetic macular edema. When this swelling occurs in the ce Continue reading >>

Americas Diabetes Challenge

Americas Diabetes Challenge

The information you provide will be available to the Merck & Co., Inc., family of companies (collectively, Merck) and others working on behalf of Merck, and according to the same standards, to provide the information and services you request. Personal information about you will not otherwise be disclosed for marketing purposes without your permission. Merck reviews personal information and nonidentifiable information not only to provide the requested information and services but also to develop and offer additional services and communications that we believe our customers might find of interest. Merck also may use personal information to audit its resources for compliance and security purposes. For more information about how Merck protects personal information about you, please read the Internet Privacy Policy and the Privacy Statement for patients, consumers, and caregivers . The materials displayed on this website are protected by copyright, trademark, and other intellectual property laws. Before uploading a story to www.AmericasDiabetesChallenge.com, carefully read the following Terms and Conditions of use. Uploading any narrative, caption, photo or video through this website constitutes your acceptance of the Terms and Conditions of use outlined herein. By uploading a story, you are giving Merck, its affiliates and licensees permission, to use, or edit, your experience (or story), at their discretion, on this website and in other promotional or marketing materials developed by Merck. Once submitted, it can become available for viewing by any other person for as long as the website is published and any copies of published materials are in circulation. Note, if further information is needed about your story, you may be notified via the contact information you provide Continue reading >>

The Michigan Model For Coronary Heart Disease In Type 2 Diabetes: Development And Validation

The Michigan Model For Coronary Heart Disease In Type 2 Diabetes: Development And Validation

The Michigan Model for Coronary Heart Disease in Type 2 Diabetes: Development and Validation 1 Michael Brandle , MD, MS,2 Morton B. Brown , PhD,1 and William H. Herman , MD, MPH3,,4 3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 4Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 1Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 2Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland. 3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 4Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Address correspondence to:, Wen Ye, PhD, Department of Biostatistics, M2515 SPH II, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, E-mail:Email: [email protected] Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a computer simulation model for coronary heart disease (CHD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that reflects current medical and surgical treatments. Research Design and Methods: We modified the structure of the CHD submodel in the Michigan Model for Diabetes to allow for revascularization procedures before and after first myocardial infarction, for repeat myocardial infarctions and repeat revascularization procedures, and for congestive heart failure. Transition probabilities that reflect the direct effects of medical and surgical therapies on outcomes were derived from the literature and calibrated to recently published population-based epidemiologic studies and randomized controlled clinical trials. Monte Carlo techniques were used to implement a discrete-state and discrete-time multistate microsimulation model. Performance of the model was assessed using internal and external v Continue reading >>

Pharmacologic Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes: Synopsis Of The 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes Free

Pharmacologic Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes: Synopsis Of The 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes Free

Abstract Description: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) annually updates the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payers, and other interested parties with evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. Methods: For the 2017 Standards, the ADA Professional Practice Committee updated previous MEDLINE searches performed from 1 January 2016 to November 2016 to add, clarify, or revise recommendations based on new evidence. The committee rates the recommendations as A, B, or C, depending on the quality of evidence, or E for expert consensus or clinical experience. The Standards were reviewed and approved by the Executive Committee of the ADA Board of Directors, which includes health care professionals, scientists, and laypersons. Feedback from the larger clinical community informed revisions. Recommendations: This synopsis focuses on recommendations from the 2017 Standards about pharmacologic approaches to glycemic treatment of type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) first released its Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes for health professionals in 1989. These practice guidelines provide an extensive set of evidence-based recommendations that are updated annually for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. The 2017 Standards cover all aspects of patient care (1); this guideline synopsis focuses on pharmacologic approaches for patients with type 2 diabetes. Pharmacologic Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes: Recommendations Initial Treatment Approach: Metformin Assessing Response and Deciding to Intensify Therapy Recent Evidence From Cardiovascular Outcomes Trials Recent Warnings About Pharmacotherapies Insulin Therapy Continue reading >>

Webinars | Michigan Care Management Resource Center

Webinars | Michigan Care Management Resource Center

Michigan Physician Orders for Scope of Treatment Consultant, Advance Care Planning - Michigan, Michigan Primary Care Consortium "This continuing nursing education activity was approved by the Ohio Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Centers Commission on Accreditation. (OBN-001-91)" Michigan Care Management Resource Center is an approved provider with the Michigan Social Work Continuing Education Collaborative. Approved Provider Number: MICEC 110216 This program has been pre-approved by The Commission for Case Manager Certification to provide continuing education credit to CCM board certified case managers. The course is approved for 1.0 CE contact hour(s). Activity code: I00032369 Approval Number: 180002048 To claim these CEs, log into your CCMC Dashboard at www.ccmcertification.org . 2018 Update in Standards of Care for Management of Diabetes SAVE THE DATE: 2018 Update in Standards of Care for Management of Diabetes Announcing 2018 Update in Standards of Care for Management of Diabetes Webinar to be held on July 27, 2018. Check back here soon for complete details. Advance Care Planning Conversation Basics Community Coordinator, Making Choices Michigan "This continuing nursing education activity was approved by the Ohio Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Centers Commission on Accreditation. (OBN-001-91)" Michigan Care Management Resource Center is an approved provider with the Michigan Social Work Continuing Education Collaborative. Approved Provider Number: MICEC 110216 This program has been pre-approved by The Commission for Case Manager Certification to provide continuing education credit to CCM board certified case managers. The course is approved for 1.0 CE contact hour(s). A Continue reading >>

Mpro, Helping Health Care Get Better

Mpro, Helping Health Care Get Better

Medicare Quality Improvement Governor's Award Cancer Control Diabetes & Hypertension Project Experience and Staff MPRO is working with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services to encourage practices to implement guidelines that will improve the treatment and follow-up care for patients who have either hypertension and/or diabetes. MPRO is working to advance these statewide initiatives: Increase recognition of undiagnosed hypertension at an early age and develop steps towards adequate blood pressure management, defined as <140/90. (NQF 0018). Increase recognition of undiagnosed diabetes at an early stage and take steps towards comprehensive diabetes care for patients with HbA1c levels >9.0%. (NQF 0059). Free services from MPRO to assist your practice with optimization of your EHR and associated diabetes and hypertension management workflows. Incorporation of hypertension and diabetes protocols into your EHR Quarterly reporting of NQF 0018 and NQF 0059. Semi-annual snapshot report will show how you compare to other providers in the state. Read the latest e-update to catch up on the most recent diabetes and hypertension news. Access the May 2018 e-update> Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Midmichigan Health

Diabetes - Midmichigan Health

The Diabetes programs within MidMichigan Health help people with diabetes take control of their illness so they can live full and active lives here in the middle of Michigan. Diabetes is a disease that prevents the body from correctly utilizing glucose the fuel that is made from the carbohydrates we eat. There are several types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes- In Type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. This type of diabetes was previously known as juvenile onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetes- In type 2 diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin, or the body cannot use the insulin properly. This is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational diabetes- This type of diabetes effects pregnant women who have never had diabetes before, but who have high blood sugar levels during pregnancy. It is a temporary condition that affects one in 20 pregnant women. Prediabetes- This condition occurs in people that have blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, although not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetic. You may want to check with your insurance plan to see which programs and services are covered. The diabetes education programs at MidMichigan Medical Centersin Clare,Gladwin, Midland, and Mt. Pleasant havebeenrecognized by the American Association of Diabetes Educators for meeting national quality standards.These programs have also earned state certification by the Michigan Department of Community Health . The diabetes instructors at the Diabetes Center of MidMichigan Medical Center in Midland are certified diabetes educators (CDEs), which assures that they have met specific requirements of the National Certification Board of Diabetes Educators. More than 86 million Americans have prediabetes and are at r Continue reading >>

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