diabetestalk.net

Diabetes In Developed Countries

Developing Countriesdeveloping Countries

Developing Countriesdeveloping Countries

COSTS OF DIABETES IN COSTS OF DIABETES IN Jonathan Betz Brown, MPP, PhD Chair, International Diabetes Federation Task Force on Diabetes Health Economics Senior Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, Oregon, USA [email protected] Complications of Diabetes � Coronary Artery Disease � Stroke �Heart Failure � Peripheral Neuropathy � Peripheral Artery Diseaseà Amputation � Blindness �Renal Failure � Acute Hyperglycemic Symptoms � Tuberculosis, HIV MILLIONS Global Deaths by CauseGlobal Deaths by Cause 1.21.2Malaria 2.62.6HIV/AIDS 13.413.4CVD (w/ DM) 3.83.8Diabetes DeathsDeaths Sources: International Diabetes Federation. Diabetes Atlas, Third Ed., 2006. World Health Organization. Global Burden of Disease Project. 2003 THOUSANDS, AGED 20-79 2007 Deaths from Diabetes2007 Deaths from Diabetes 337 297 721 242 189 1017 978 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 AFRAFRAFRAFR EMMEEMMEEMMEEMME EUREUREUREUR NANANANA SACASACASACASACA SEASEASEASEA WPWPWPWP Source: International Diabetes Federation. Diabetes Atlas, Third Ed., 2006. Health Care Expenditures for Health Care Expenditures for Diabetes, 2007Diabetes, 2007 USD 350 billionUSD 350 billion2002 2002 Intern’lIntern’l $$ USD 300 billionUSD 300 billion2002 2002 US DollarsUS Dollars Source: International Diabetes Federation. Diabetes Atlas, Third Ed., 2006 ESTIMATED DIABETES-CAUSED Spending Per Capita w/ DM, 2007 10641064318318South AfricaSouth Africa 75753333NigeriaNigeria 56562424TanzaniaTanzania 1251253434KenyaKenya 1221225656CameroonCameroon 303066BurundiBurundi 6231623162316231USAUSA IDIDUSDUSD Source: IDF Diabetes Atlas, Third Edition, 2007 664966496649 BILLIONS OF USD 2002, R=2BILLIONS OF USD 2002, R=2 2007 Health Expenditures for Diabetes2007 Continue reading >>

International Journal Of Diabetes In Developing Countries

International Journal Of Diabetes In Developing Countries

Incorporating Diabetes Bulletin Description International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries is a peer-reviewed journal with global reach and championed and edited by experts in the field. The journal focuses on the complete spectrum of contemporary clinical and basic science related issues, new and emerging technologies, cutting-edge innovations and future trends in the field of diabetes. It publishes work done in the developing world, especially from countr … show all Browse Volumes & Issues Continue reading >>

Globalization Of Diabetes

Globalization Of Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a global public health crisis that threatens the economies of all nations, particularly developing countries. Fueled by rapid urbanization, nutrition transition, and increasingly sedentary lifestyles, the epidemic has grown in parallel with the worldwide rise in obesity. Asia's large population and rapid economic development have made it an epicenter of the epidemic. Asian populations tend to develop diabetes at younger ages and lower BMI levels than Caucasians. Several factors contribute to accelerated diabetes epidemic in Asians, including the “normal-weight metabolically obese” phenotype; high prevalence of smoking and heavy alcohol use; high intake of refined carbohydrates (e.g., white rice); and dramatically decreased physical activity levels. Poor nutrition in utero and in early life combined with overnutrition in later life may also play a role in Asia's diabetes epidemic. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology, but currently identified genetic loci are insufficient to explain ethnic differences in diabetes risk. Nonetheless, interactions between Westernized diet and lifestyle and genetic background may accelerate the growth of diabetes in the context of rapid nutrition transition. Epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials show that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through diet and lifestyle modifications. Translating these findings into practice, however, requires fundamental changes in public policies, the food and built environments, and health systems. To curb the escalating diabetes epidemic, primary prevention through promotion of a healthy diet and lifestyle should be a global public policy priority. THE GLOBAL BURDEN OF TYPE Continue reading >>

Depression And Type 2 Diabetes In Developed And Developing Countries

Depression And Type 2 Diabetes In Developed And Developing Countries

Sir, Diabetes patients are more exposed to depression. This association might yield higher rates of mortality, morbidity and costs of health-care.[1] The world evaluation of depression prevalence in diabetes patients seems to vary according to the prosperity and health-care system of each country.[2] Hence, what are the factors of impact on the gap of depression rate within type 2 diabetes (T2D) in developing and developed countries? What are the care possibilities to reduce the depression rate in developing countries compared with developed countries? To answer this question, we achieved a transversal study in the University Hospital of Fez, Morocco. The study included 142 T2D patients. The average age of patients was 56.68-year-old, without significant difference in gender ration. The depression prevalence in our patients was 33.1%. Factors connected to the depression of MoroccanT2D are summarized in Table 1. The prevalence of T2D was significantly higher compared with the general population. It varies between 12% and 44%. Indeed, the prevalence of T2D is lower in western countries; it is elevated in developing countries.[3,4] The literature review revealed that depression of T2D patients is mostly associated to unchangeable factors such as the duration of evolution and arterial hypertension, which are common factors in developed and developing countries.[3] Besides, depression of T2D patients is strongly connected the low educational level of patients, a lack of social security. These two factors are dominant in developing countries.[5] Indeed, in developing countries factors such as lack of social, lower educational level, strong poverty level and resources and financial difficulties constitute the economical outline of stress responsible for insecurity feeling towa Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Diabetes Complications In Developing Countries: Time To Intensify Self-management Education

Prevention Of Diabetes Complications In Developing Countries: Time To Intensify Self-management Education

The IDF report has indicated that about 80% of four million diabetes-related deaths that occur every year comes from the developing world. The IDF report suggests the need to focus more on preventing diabetes complications in poor countries. Thus, considering the economic constraints in combating the explosion of diabetes complications in the developing regions of the world, it appears that exploring culturally adaptable educational intervention programmes for specific regions would be the appropriate strategy. We believe that diabetes-related deaths could be reduced in developing countries through intensified diabetes self-management education. The 2009 Atlas Report of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) on the global prevalence rates of diabetes showed that diabetes prevalence is much more prominent in the developing regions of the world and more than 438 million people will be living with diabetes by the year 2030 (Sicree et al., 2009). Unfortunately, the statistics suggests that the intense campaign on the prevention of diabetes by the IDF and affiliated organizations around the world has not matched the epidemic development of diabetes in poor-resource countries and indeed the entire world (Sicree et al., 2009). The reports of increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes in young adults in both the developing and developed nations poses yet more challenges for the campaign for prevention of diabetes and its complications (Vivian et al., 2011). As childhood type 2 diabetes is associated with obesity and sedentary lifestyle, management of both obesity and diabetes in adolescents will demand robust treatment paradigm and more challenging in the developing world (Scollan-Koliopoulos et al., 2011). In developing countries, childhood type 2 diabetes may be associated Continue reading >>

Globalization Of Diabetes

Globalization Of Diabetes

Go to: THE GLOBAL BURDEN OF TYPE 2 DIABETES The dynamics of the diabetes epidemic are changing rapidly. Once a disease of the West, type 2 diabetes has now spread to every country in the world. Once “a disease of affluence,” it is now increasingly common among the poor. Once an adult-onset disease almost unheard of in children, rising rates of childhood obesity have rendered it more common in the pediatric population, especially in certain ethnic groups. According to the International Diabetes Federation (1), diabetes affects at least 285 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to reach 438 million by the year 2030, with two-thirds of all diabetes cases occurring in low- to middle-income countries. The number of adults with impaired glucose tolerance will rise from 344 million in 2010 to an estimated 472 million by 2030. Globally, it was estimated that diabetes accounted for 12% of health expenditures in 2010, or at least $376 billion—a figure expected to hit $490 billion in 2030 (2). Its increasing prevalence and associated health complications threaten to reverse economic gains in developing countries. With limited infrastructures for diabetes care, many countries are ill-equipped to manage this epidemic. Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes Mellitus In Developing Countries

Preventing Diabetes Mellitus In Developing Countries

By the year 2030, >70% of people living with T2DM will reside in developing countries, and primary prevention of T2DM should be an urgent priority for such regions. The disease predominantly affects working-age persons and has a devastating economic impact, compounded by the frequent occurrence and interaction of T2DM with infectious diseases (such as AIDS and tuberculosis). Evidence from landmark T2DM prevention trials indicates that lifestyle modification is more effective, cheaper and safer than medication and provides sustained benefits. Lifestyle modification is, therefore, the most promising approach to T2DM prevention in developing countries; however, programmes adapted to their specific needs are lacking. Low-cost strategies to identify at-risk individuals, followed by the implementation of group-based, inexpensive lifestyle interventions, seem to be the best options for resource-poor countries. However, widespread implementation of T2DM prevention in developing countries will require coordinated efforts throughout society, along with comprehensive government policies and novel funding sources. Corrected online 01 October 2012 In the version of this article initially published in print and online there was a mistake saying small-molecule agents were used in preclinical studies The sentence should have read "preclinical studies have shown that a few adenovirus-delivered transcription factors could induce exocrine pancreatic cells to transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells.39" The error has been corrected for the HTML and PDF versions of the article. Danaei, G. et al. National, regional, and global trends in fasting plasma glucose and diabetes prevalence since 1980: systematic analysis of health examination surveys and epidemiological studies with 370 coun Continue reading >>

America Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The Developing World - While The Uk, Australia And Lithuania Are Among Those Nations With The Lowest Rates Of The Condition

America Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The Developing World - While The Uk, Australia And Lithuania Are Among Those Nations With The Lowest Rates Of The Condition

The US has the highest prevalence of diabetes among all developed countries across the world, new data reveals. Almost 11 per cent of Americans between the ages of 20 and 79 suffers from the disease, according to data from the International Diabetes Federation. That’s an estimated 30 million adults across the country. Such is the scale of the issue in the US, the country had nearly two-thirds the total number of cases of all the other 37 developed nations combined, experts warned. In contrast, those nations have a total of 46 million cases between them. The International Diabetes Federation has revealed the US tops the league tables of developing countries with the highest prevalence of the disease, with 10.75 per cent of adults suffering type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Singapore and Malta come in second and third place PREVALENCE OF DIABETES IN ADULTS AGE 20-79 IN DEVELOPED COUNTRIES Top Ten - Highest prevalence % Bottom Ten - Lowest prevalence % 1. United States 10.75 1. Lithuania 3.97 2. Singapore 10.53 2. Estonia 4.37 3. Malta 9.92 3. Ireland 4.39 4. Portugal 9.86 4. Sweden 4.7 5. Cyprus 9.55 5. Luxembourg 4.73 6. Andorra 8.52 6. United Kingdom 4.73 7. Slovenia 7.77 7. Australia 5.06 8. Slovakia 7.76 8. Belgium 5.09 9. Spain 7.7 9. Italy 5.12 10. Israel 7.46 10. Greece 5.16 Experts said the high number of people in the US suffering diabetes, is in large part, due to the number living with type 2 diabetes. The condition is closely linked to obesity. Dr Petra Wilson, the CEO of IDF, called on governments to take actions, including introducing taxes on unhealthy food and drink to try and curb the obesity epidemic. He said: 'As rates of type 2 diabetes increase in many countries around the world, we urgently need preventative action. 'IDF asks governments to lead the way i Continue reading >>

International Journal Of Diabetes In Developing Countries

International Journal Of Diabetes In Developing Countries

Journal description The International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries targets a readership consisting of clinicians, research workers, paramedical personnel, nutritionists and health care personnel working in the field of diabetes. Original research work and reviews of interest to the above group of readers will be considered for publication in the journal. The journal is the official publication of the Research Society for the Study of Diabetes in India. The International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries has a goal of serving as an important resource material in diabetes for its readers, mainly in the developing world. RG Journal Impact: 0.36 * *This value is calculated using ResearchGate data and is based on average citation counts from work published in this journal. The data used in the calculation may not be exhaustive. RG Journal impact history 2017 RG Journal impact Available summer 2018 2015 / 2016 RG Journal impact 0.36 2014 RG Journal impact 0.33 2013 RG Journal impact 0.41 2012 RG Journal impact 0.26 2009 RG Journal impact 0.28 2008 RG Journal impact 0.18 2007 RG Journal impact 0.12 RG Journal impact over time Additional details 4.60 data not available Internet resource Continue reading >>

Nurses Knowledge Of Diabetes In Developed And Developing Countries

Nurses Knowledge Of Diabetes In Developed And Developing Countries

University of Technology Sydney, Australia Background: With a rising prevalence of diabetes world-wide, nurses have an important role in care of people with diabetes. To be able to effectively support patients’ self-management, nurses require a comprehensive understanding of all aspects of diabetes care and treatment. Objective: This study aimed to critically appraise and synthesis the best available evidence of nurses’ knowledge related to diabetes care, and to identify barriers to knowledge acquisition. Design: Integrative review Methods: We conducted a systematic search for English-language, peer reviewed quantitative, qualitative and mixed method publications via CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE, and Education Research Complete databases between 2004 and 2014. A total of 374 articles were retrieved. After removal of duplicates and quality assessment, 25 studies were included in the review. Results: The reviewed studies originated from five continents, mainly from developed countries, and used a variety of study designs and tools to assess nurses’ knowledge of diabetes. Aspects of diabetes care assessed included nurses’ knowledge of: diabetes medications (12 studies), nutrition (7), blood glucose monitoring (8), diabetes complications (6), pathology, symptoms and diabetes management (9); factors/barriers affecting nurses’ diabetes knowledge were described (11). Synthesis of the articles based on study designs, objectives, and country of origin and assessment tools indicated that overall, substantial proportions of nurse in many countries and healthcare settings have suboptimal knowledge about diabetes and diabetes care. Conclusion: This review indicates that the nursing workforce internationally may experience significant knowledge deficits in various aspects of dia Continue reading >>

Tackling The Diabetes Epidemic In Developing Countries

Tackling The Diabetes Epidemic In Developing Countries

Local anchoring is key According to Dr Dejgaard, action is needed at the global, regional and local levels. Diabetes is a chronic, debilitating and costly disease, which threatens individuals, health systems and governments. He emphasises the importance of implementing national policies for effective diabetes prevention, treatment and care; developing awareness campaigns; and implementing sustainable diabetes programmes locally. The last point is key. The WDF currently supports programmes in 117 developing countries, working with partners such as local diabetes associations, health authorities and NGOs. Many programmes are anchored in the Ministry of Health. As Dr Dejgaard notes, “it is critical that local anchoring is solid, so that project activities become sustainable in a given country when our financial support stops.” With regard to awareness, WDF programme coordinator, Mr Jakob Sloth Yigen Madsen, says: increasing knowledge about the benefits of healthy lifestyle behaviours among people living in developing countries is crucial – but it is not enough. We also need to understand what drives and hinders certain behaviours. These drivers and barriers can be individual, sociocultural as well as structural. “It is essential to understand the target group and its surroundings, and design interventions accordingly. For example, schoolchildren and factory workers may have very different reasons for not exercising, as a result of differences in knowledge, socio-cultural frameworks and opportunities for physical activity,” he says. When promoting healthy behaviours, we also need to assess whether these efforts work. Mr Madsen recommends collecting data about blood glucose levels, blood pressure and body mass index before and after such campaigns, to determine whe Continue reading >>

Obesity And Diabetes In The Developing World — A Growing Challenge

Obesity And Diabetes In The Developing World — A Growing Challenge

Globally, the prevalence of chronic, noncommunicable diseases is increasing at an alarming rate. About 18 million people die every year from cardiovascular disease, for which diabetes and hypertension are major predisposing factors. Propelling the upsurge in cases of diabetes and hypertension is the growing prevalence of overweight and obesity — which have, during the past decade, joined underweight, malnutrition, and infectious diseases as major health problems threatening the developing world.1 Today, more than 1.1 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese. In addition, at least 155 million children worldwide are overweight or obese, according to the International Obesity Task Force. This task force and the World Health Organization (WHO) have revised the definition of obesity to adjust for ethnic differences, and this broader definition may reflect an even higher prevalence — with 1.7 billion people classified as overweight worldwide.1 In the past 20 years, the rates of obesity have tripled in developing countries that have been adopting a Western lifestyle involving decreased physical activity and overconsumption of cheap, energy-dense food. Such lifestyle changes are also affecting children in these countries; the prevalence of overweight among them ranges from 10 to 25%, and the prevalence of obesity ranges from 2 to 10%. The Middle East, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, and China face the greatest threat. The relationship between obesity and poverty is complex: being poor in one of the world's poorest countries (i.e., in countries with a per capita gross national product [GNP] of less than $800 per year) is associated with underweight and malnutrition, whereas being poor in a middle-income country (with a per capita GNP of abo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Exploding In Developing And Middle-income Countries

Diabetes Is Exploding In Developing And Middle-income Countries

(Nam Y. Huh / Associated Press) A new global assessment of diabetes finds that the number of adult diabetics continues to rise dramatically, driven by aging populations, sedentary lifestyles and, in some areas, a heightened genetic vulnerability to the disease. The growth has been particularly notable in developing and middle-income countries. The assessment makes clear that world health leaders can now make a pretty safe prediction: Their goal for the year 2025 of holding worldwide diabetes prevalence to the level that prevailed in 2010 will not be met. In 2014 the number of adult diabetics stood at 422 million, up from 108 million in 1980. By 2025, the number of diabetic adults worldwide is expected to surpass 700 million. By then, 12.8% of men and 10.4% of women are expected to have diabetes, a metabolic disorder that increases two- to fourfold a sufferer's risk of having a heart attack or stroke. The new research was published in the journal Lancet. Data were compiled and analyzed by an international team of public health researchers under a grant from Britain's Wellcome Trust. Between 1980 and 2014, 120 countries saw the prevalence of diabetes across the age spectrum double for men, and 87 countries experienced a doubling of diabetes rates among women. Nowhere did diabetes rates significantly decline in that period. In the process, men by 2014 took on the greater burden of diabetes from women, who in 1980 were more likely than men to suffer from the disorder. Across the islands of Polynesia and Micronesia, roughly 1 in 4 adults has diabetes — up 15 percentage points since 1980. And the countries of the Middle East and North Africa, where roughly 15% of adults have diabetes, have seen increases in the disorder almost as great. In 1980, higher-income European count Continue reading >>

International Journal Of Diabetes In Developing Countries

International Journal Of Diabetes In Developing Countries

International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries is a peer-reviewed open-access journal published on behalf of the Research Society for the Study of Diabetes in India. The journal was established in 1981 as the Diabetes Bulletin by the founding editor M. M. S. Ahuja. The journal publishes articles on the subject of experimental and clinical aspects of diabetes and its complications. The journal is abstracted and indexed in Academic OneFile, CAB Abstracts, EBSCO Databases, Global Health, Health Reference Center Academic, Science Citation Index Expanded, and Scopus. External links[edit] Official website Continue reading >>

U.s. Leads Developed Nations In Diabetes Prevalence

U.s. Leads Developed Nations In Diabetes Prevalence

New and detailed data from the new International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Diabetes Atlas, released at this week’s World Diabetes Congress in Vancouver, Canada (Nov 30-Dec 4) reveals that, unsurprisingly, the United States has the highest prevalence (11% of the population aged 20-79 years) of diabetes among developed nations. This league table includes countries of the European Union plus Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Israel, Andorra, Norway, Switzerland, and the U.S. itself. And in terms of estimates of absolute numbers of people with diabetes in these nations, the U.S., with almost 30 million people with diabetes, has around two thirds the number of cases of all the other 37 nations in the developed nation league combined (46 million). In terms of prevalence, Singapore finished a close second to the U.S. (10.5%), followed by Malta (10%), Portugal (10%), and Cyprus (9.5%) in 3rd, 4th, and 5th place respectively. The countries with the lowest estimated prevalence in the 38 nation league were (lowest first), Lithuania, Estonia, and Ireland (all around 4%), followed by Sweden, Luxembourg, the U.K., and Australia (all around 5%). Canada, the host nation for the World Diabetes Congress, has the 12th highest prevalence, at 7%. “The prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide,” says Professor Nam Cho, chair of the IDF Diabetes Atlas committee. “While the exact cause of type 1 diabetes is currently unknown, trends such as urbanisation, unhealthy diets and reduced physical activity are all contributing lifestyle factors that increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.” The individual country data follows the release of the Diabetes Atlas summary, revealing that an estimated 415 million people globally have diabetes in 2015, wit Continue reading >>

More in diabetes