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Type 1 Diabetes On The Rise In China | Asian Scientist Magazine | Science, Technology And Medical News Updates From Asia

Type 1 Diabetes On The Rise In China | Asian Scientist Magazine | Science, Technology And Medical News Updates From Asia

New research reveals a rise in the number of Chinese being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, with adults accounting for most of the new cases. AsianScientist (Jan. 16, 2018) Researchers in China have revealed a rise in the number of Chinese being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, with adults accounting for most of the new cases. The BMJ study represents the first nationwide survey of type 1 diabetes in recent years. A team of researchers led by Dr. Weng Jianping at The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University set out to investigate the incidence of type 1 diabetes in all age groups in China from 2010-2013. Their study population covered more than 133 million peoplewhich is approximately 10 percent of the Chinese populationof which 6 percent was under 15 years old. The researchers estimate that the incidence of type 1 diabetes in both children and adults in China was among the lowest reported globally during that period, at 1.01 new cases per 100,000 person years for all ages, and at 1.93 new cases per 100,000 person years for ages 0-14 years. Nevertheless, they discovered that more than 13,000 new cases of type 1 diabetes occur every year in China, out of which more than 9,000 occur in people aged 15 or older. The study also showed that the incidence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0-14 years was strongly correlated with latitude, with higher rates in the north and lower rates in the south; such a correlation was not seen in those aged 15 or older. The study did not identify what genetic or environmental factors were responsible for this observation. The authors point to certain limitations in their study. For example, their survey included a higher proportion of urban dwellers, which could confound the link between type 1 diabetes and the environment. It Continue reading >>

Identification Of Potential Type Ii Diabetes In A Chinese Population With A Sensitive Decision Tree Approach

Identification Of Potential Type Ii Diabetes In A Chinese Population With A Sensitive Decision Tree Approach

Identification of Potential Type II Diabetes in a Chinese Population with a Sensitive Decision Tree Approach 1Department of Family Medicine, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China 2Department of Informatics, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China 3Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China Correspondence should be addressed to Qiyong Guo ; [email protected] Received 19 July 2018; Revised 20 November 2018; Accepted 18 December 2018; Published 22 January 2019 Copyright 2019 Dongmei Pei et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with a steadfast increase in prevalence. Due to the chronic course of the disease combining with devastating complications, this disorder could easily carry a financial burden. The early diagnosis of diabetes remains as one of the major challenges medical providers are facing, and the satisfactory screening tools or methods are still required, especially a population- or community-based tool. Methods. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study involving 15,323 subjects who underwent the annual check-up in the Department of Family Medicine of Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University from January 2017 to June 2017. With a strict data filtration, 10,436 records from the eligible participants were utilized to develop a prediction model using the J48 decision tree algorithm. Nine variables, including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, history of cardiovascular disease or stroke, f Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic In East Asia: A 35year Systematic Trend Analysis

Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic In East Asia: A 35year Systematic Trend Analysis

Type 2 diabetes epidemic in East Asia: a 35year systematic trend analysis 1 The MOH Key Laboratory of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital, National Center of Gerontology, Beijing, P.R. China 2 College of Public Health, Shaanxi University of Chinese Medicine, Xianyang, P.R. China 1 The MOH Key Laboratory of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital, National Center of Gerontology, Beijing, P.R. China 2 College of Public Health, Shaanxi University of Chinese Medicine, Xianyang, P.R. China 3 Statistical Room, Beijing Ditan Hospital Capital University, Beijing, P.R. China Correspondence to:Huiping Yuan,Email: [email protected] Received 2017 Aug 9; Accepted 2017 Nov 9. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0 (CC BY 3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. GUID:79BB5DFF-96A3-469F-9C90-E58EA88DB214 Facing the challenge of effective prevention type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in China (as part of global health) requires knowledge about both the temporal trend and risk factors variation in T2DM. We searched the PubMed, CNKI, WANFANG, and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) databases for data on the prevalence of T2DM/ IGT (impaired glucose tolerance) published from January 1, 1980 to December 31, 2014 in China, Japan and Korea. The prevalence of T2DM was estimated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using randomeffects metaanalysis. T2DM prevalence trend in the next 10 years was estimated by using a time series regression model based on the 35 years of data. The 621 articles covered 11.8 million Chinese people, 1.64 million Japanese, and 37.69 million Koreans. The aggregate prevalence of Continue reading >>

Diabetes In China - Stories | Merck Global

Diabetes In China - Stories | Merck Global

Merck Serono in Shanghai is also working to raise awareness of diabetes. That is not surprising, given the fact that several variations of Glucophage a prescription drug for treating diabetes that was developed by Merck in 1957 are still part of the companys portfolio today. Glucophage is based on the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride, which is recognized as the gold standard for diabetes treatment, says Catherine Yu, a former physician who now serves as Director of Marketing at Merck Serono in Shanghai, a dynamic city with more than 24 million inhabitants. How does Yu do her job in a country thats nearly as big as Europe? We focus on those 40 to 60 large cities whose high average incomes make the risk of diabetes greater than in other metropolitan areas, Yu explains. You have to understand that people who can switch from a bicycle to a car will do so, and will therefore get less exercise. Among other things, Yu is responsible for targeting e-marketing campaigns at the roughly 50,000 doctors in China who specialize in treating diabetes. These physicians often do not earn even as much as US$2,000 per month, and they are also not very familiar with digital media, says Yu. Mercks 320 representatives in China (as of fall 2014) talk with around 8,000 Chinese physicians each year. They visit the doctors weekly or monthly as needed, and provide them with information about the latest research results. In August 2014 alone, we documented around 300 published articles on metformin, says Yu. The Merck representatives also explain the treatment guidelines and provide information brochures to doctors and patients. Chinese people should eat out less often and instead go back to preparing meals themselves. We also hold a Merck Forum every year in China that focuses on endocri Continue reading >>

High Prevalence Of Diabetes, Prediabetes In China

High Prevalence Of Diabetes, Prediabetes In China

Media Advisory: To contact Linhong Wang, Ph.D., email [email protected]; to contact Yonghua Hu, M.D., email [email protected] To place an electronic embedded link to this study in your story This link will be live at the embargo time: JAMA A large, nationally representative survey in 2013 of adults in China finds that the estimated overall prevalence of diabetes was about 11 percent and that of prediabetes was nearly 36 percent, according to a study published by JAMA. Previous studies have shown increasing prevalence of diabetes in China, which now has the world’s largest diabetes epidemic. To provide more recent estimates of the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes, Linhong Wang, Ph.D., of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, and Yonghua Hu, M.D., of Peking University, Beijing, and colleagues analyzed data from a nationally representative survey conducted in 2013 in mainland China, which included 170,287 participants. Fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels were measured for all participants. Diabetes and prediabetes were defined according to the 2010 American Diabetes Association criteria. Among the findings: The estimated prevalence of total diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes was 10.9 percent; that of diagnosed diabetes, 4 percent; and that of prediabetes, 35.7 percent. Among persons with diabetes, 36.5 percent were aware of their diagnosis and 32.2 percent were treated; 49.2 percent of patients treated had adequate glycemic control. Tibetan and Muslim Chinese had significantly lower prevalence of diabetes than Han participants (14.7 percent for Han, 4.3 percent for Tibetan, and 10.6 percent for Muslim). The authors write that the prevalence of diabetes of 10.9 percent was only slightly lower than the prevalence of total Continue reading >>

Diabetes In China

Diabetes In China

Tweet The number of people with diabetes in China is estimated to be 1 in 10 out of Chinese adult. Compared with the UK, where diabetes affects about 1 in 20 adults, the state of diabetes in China is alarming. During the 21st Century millions of new cases of diabetes are occurring each year. However, an accurate figure for diabetes in China is hard to estimate, as many cases are thought to be undiagnosed. China is thought to have edged ahead of India, becoming the country with the highest population of diabetes in the world. Like many other countries, the principal pre-cursor to the development of type 2 diabetes is obesity. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cas Continue reading >>

Incidence Of Type 1 Diabetes In China, 2010-13: Population Based Study

Incidence Of Type 1 Diabetes In China, 2010-13: Population Based Study

Incidence of type 1 diabetes in China, 2010-13: population based study Incidence of type 1 diabetes in China, 2010-13: population based study BMJ 2018; 360 doi: (Published 04 January 2018) Cite this as: BMJ 2018;360:j5295 Correspondence to: J Weng, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Disease, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510630, China wjianp{at}mail.sysu.edu.cn Objective To estimate the incidence of type 1 diabetes in all age groups in China during 2010-13. Design Population based, registry study using data from multiple independent sources. Setting National registration system in all 505 hospitals providing diabetes care, and communities of patients with diabetes in 13 areas across China, covering more than 133 million person years at risk, approximately 10% of the whole population. Participants 5018 people of all ages with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and resident in the study areas from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2013. Main outcome measures Incidence of type 1 diabetes per 100 000 person years by age, sex, and study area. Type 1 diabetes was doctor diagnosed and further validated by onsite follow-up. Completeness of case ascertainment was assessed using the capture mark recapture method. Results 5018 cases of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes were ascertained: 1239 participants were aged <15 years, 1799 were aged 15-29 years, and 1980 were aged 30 years. The proportion of new onset cases in participants aged 20 years was 65.3%. The estimated incidence of type 1 diabetes per 100 000 persons years for all ages in China was 1.01 (95% confidence interval 0.18 to 1.84). Incidence per 100 000 persons years by age group was 1.93 (0.83 to 3.03) for 0-14 years, 1.28 (0.45 to 2.11) for 15-29 years, and 0.69 (0.00 to 1.51) for 30 Continue reading >>

Wpro | Diabetes

Wpro | Diabetes

According to 2012 data from the International Diabetes Federation, in 2012, 9.4% of the population has diabetes; 92.3 million adults have diabetes; 58.8% of cases of diabetes are undiagnosed.2 Advancing age is highly correlated with diabetes in China: 3.2% of 20-39 year olds have diabetes; 11.5% of 40-59 year olds have diabetes; 20.4% of >60 year olds have diabetes. Prediabetes, an important risk factor for the development of diabetes is epidemic: 15.5% of the population has prediabetes; 148.2 million adults have prediabetes. Lower education level means higher prevalence of diabetes The study shows a significant inverse association between educational level and the prevalence of diabetes. Educational level is a good indicator of socioeconomic status, and a higher educational level has been associated with lower levels of cardiovascular risk factors, such as obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension.4 *This study was carried out in 2007-2008 and involved 46,239 adults aged 20 and older from 14 provinces and municipalities. It was published in 2010 in the reputable New England Journal of Medicine. According to the International Diabetes Federation, projections show that by 2030, 129 million people could have diabetes in China, an estimated 12.1% of the population. In 2012, the mean healthcare expenditure per person with diabetes is estimated to be USD $193.91 in China. Risk factors include being overweight or obese, lack of physical exercise, and a sedentary lifestyle. China has 200 million overweight people and 60 million obese people. Although in high-income countries, the diagnosis is made by fasting plasma glucose level, a simpler blood test (hemoglobin A1C) is being investigated for diagnostic use in low and middle-income countries. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are chro Continue reading >>

Series Causes Of Type 2 Diabetes In China

Series Causes Of Type 2 Diabetes In China

Summary The prevalence of diabetes in China has increased substantially over recent decades, with more than 100 million people estimated to be affected by the disease presently. During this period there has been an increase in the rates of obesity and a reduction in physical activity. Many of the changes in lifestyle and diet are a result of increased economic development and urbanisation. In addition to an increasingly westernised diet, the traditional Chinese diet also plays a part, with the quantity and quality of rice intake linked to the risk of type 2 diabetes. Familial factors including inherited genetic variants are important, although differences in the genetic architecture suggest a different combination of genetic variants could be most relevant in Chinese when compared with Europeans. Recent advances have also emphasised the role of early life factors in the epidemic of diabetes and non-communicable diseases: maternal undernutrition, maternal obesity, and gestational diabetes are all linked to increased risk of diabetes in offspring. A mismatch between developmentally programmed biology and the modern environment is relevant for countries like China where there has been rapid economic transformation. Multisectoral efforts to address the risks will be needed at different stages throughout the lifecourse to reduce the burden of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Worth A Shot: The Fraught Lives Of Chinas Type 1 Diabetics

Worth A Shot: The Fraught Lives Of Chinas Type 1 Diabetics

Worth a Shot: The Fraught Lives of Chinas Type 1 Diabetics Chinese people with the rarer form of diabetes are all too familiar with poor health care and social discrimination. GUANGDONG, South China Zhong Jianhua is cheerful, talkative, and energetic. But when shes alone, she often feels depressed. In her hometown of Heyuan, most women her age are already married with children. Although the 29-year-old accountant was in a stable relationship for several years, she and her ex-boyfriend broke up in 2016. Zhong attributes their split to the disease she kept hidden for 17 years. When his family heard that I had Type 1 diabetes, they put an end to the relationship, Zhong says. I assured them it was highly unlikely that Id pass the disease on to my children, but they were scared of the fact that I have to give myself injections every day. Self-management is extremely important for these patients its literally a matter of life and death. Sadly, the government made no effort to help. - Zeng Xifeng, founder of online Type 1 diabetes community People with Type 1 diabetes are unable to produce insulin, a hormone that controls the bodys blood sugar levels. Type 1 is rare just 5 to 10 percent of diabetics worldwide have it and is usually diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. It is also more life-threatening than Type 2 diabetes, which mostly affects the elderly and the overweight: While most Type 2 patients have low, but stable, levels of insulin and do not need to constantly monitor their blood sugar levels, people with Type 1 must constantly adjust their diets and exercise regimes, and self-administer insulin injections throughout their lives. In January, Chinese endocrinologists published a study in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) estimating that over 13,000 new cases of Type Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In China: Building A Comprehensive Evidence Base Of Its Coverage, Cost And Care (3c)

Type 1 Diabetes In China: Building A Comprehensive Evidence Base Of Its Coverage, Cost And Care (3c)

Project status: Archived Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, typically due to an auto-immune reaction. It can affect people of any age, but usually occurs in children or young adults and T1D is one of the most common endocrine and metabolic conditions in childhood. People with T1D need injections of insulin every day in order to control the levels of glucose in their blood and without insulin they will die. Broadly, however, current care and education for people with T1D are not well understood or documented in China and the prospects for people with T1DM are poor. The direct and indirect costs of current care for people with T1D and the investment required to improve care is not known. Our aim is to describe coverage, cost and care of type 1 diabetes in two regions of China-Beijing and Shantou. Issue Little attention has been paid to juvenile diabetes, or type 1 diabetes mellitus in China. The World Health Organization’s Multinational Project for Childhood Diabetes (DiaMond) found that T1DM incidence in China between 1990 and 1999 was measured at 0.1/100,000. This latest data is now more than a decade old and China no longer has one of the lowest incidence rates in the world. The rate is increasing and it is estimated that the prevalence of T1DM in China will increase six-fold by 2025. However very little data exists on type 1 diabetes in China. Evidence suggests that approximately 41% are diagnosed after admission for symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis, and access to insulin and specialized care varies based on medical insurance possession, income and place of residence. The direct and indirect costs of current care for people with T1D and the investment required to improve care is not known. More information Continue reading >>

Xi Jinping Thought Doesn’t Mention China’s Health Care Crisis. It Should

Xi Jinping Thought Doesn’t Mention China’s Health Care Crisis. It Should

There is a crisis brewing in China. I’m not talking about anything military or political. The newly constitutionalized Xi Jinping Thought, a set of principles meant to guide Chinese economic, political, and military expansion in the next two decades, has been silent on the issue of national health care, which may threaten the long-term stability of China. The first highly public sign of trouble came in a 2013 report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association by Chinese scientists from Peking University and the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Their survey of more than 170,000 Chinese adults showed that 10.9 percent have diabetes, higher than the U.S. rate of 9.4 percent. That percentage may not seem like a lot. But for a country as large as China, with an adult population of 1.1 billion, that means about 120 million people have diabetes, roughly equivalent to half of the entire U.S. adult population. Among the Chinese adults surveyed, a whopping 63.5 percent were unaware of their condition and only 32.2 percent were receiving some form of treatment. Of those being treated, only about half had their blood sugar under control. Equally concerning is the number of Chinese adults with prediabetes. This intermediate condition often precedes diabetes. People with prediabetes have higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. In China, about 390 million people — more than the combined populations of the U.S. and Canada — have prediabetes. According to research published in the medical journal the Lancet in 2012, about 5 percent to 10 percent of all people with prediabetes convert to diabetes each year. There is no cure for diabetes, so treatment involves daily management. And that isn’t ch Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Epidemic In China Is A Public Health Emergency: The Potential Role Of Prenatal Exposure

The Diabetes Epidemic In China Is A Public Health Emergency: The Potential Role Of Prenatal Exposure

Paul Z. Zimmet1,2, Assam El-Osta1, Zumin Shi2,3 1Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; 2South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia; 3Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia Correspondence to: Paul Z. Zimmet, MD, PhD. Department of Medicine, Central Clinical School, Level 6, 99 Commercial Road, Melbourne 3004, Australia. Email: [email protected] Provenance: This is a Guest Editorial commissioned by the Section Editor Tao Mao (Department of Health Education, Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing, China). Comment on: Wang L, Gao P, Zhang M, et al. Prevalence and ethnic pattern of diabetes and prediabetes in China in 2013. JAMA 2017;317:2515-23. Received: 24 September 2017; Accepted: 02 October 2017; Published: 19 October 2017. Diabetes mellitus is one of the largest epidemics the world has ever faced (1). Globally, the number of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus has more than doubled over the past 20 years. The most recent global estimate from the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is that in 2015 there were 415 million people with diabetes and that by 2040 the number will be 642 million (2). The global health expenditure was estimated at US$673 billion. The IDF estimates of the number of people with diabetes, and therefore the economic costs to society, are imprecise and underestimate the disease burden (3). It is very likely that both are significant underestimates. In the face of this information, there can be no doubt that the Peoples Republic of China is now the epicentre of this global diabetes epidemic (1). This is underlined by the recent report in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) “Prevalence and Ethnic Pattern of Diabetes and Predi Continue reading >>

The Looming Public Health Crises Threatening To Take Down China’s Health Care System

The Looming Public Health Crises Threatening To Take Down China’s Health Care System

The slender, steel needle pierced Mary Shi’s pudgy belly. The sharp point pricked her skin and as her thumb pushed down on the syringe, cloudy insulin began to swim in her bloodstream. Shi was running out of places to inject herself: her stomach, arms and legs all bore the bruising from regular shots. More importantly, she was tired of having to forgo wearing T-shirts and skirts for clothes that would strategically cover her body when she went out for afternoon tea with her girlfriends in Shanghai. “When you can stand the psychosocial burden of diabetes and social discrimination, injections are really a piece of cake,” said Shi, a 30-year-old app developer. Shi was diagnosed as a diabetic when she was 18. She had been studying for the highly competitive gaokao college entrance exam when she fainted at school. An emergency doctor explained that Shi had diabetes and if the illness was left unregulated, she’d be blind within five years. Her bewildered parents became depressed and Shi came to resent the disease and the rules it imposed on her lifestyle, hiding her illness from her friends for several years. Shi is one of millions of people caught in China’s diabetes epidemic. In the 1980s diabetes was a rarity affecting just one percent of China’s population. Now, due to rapid economic development, and the subsequent growth in availability of high-calorie diets, cars and sedentary lifestyles, China has the highest number of diabetics in the world, totaling 109 million people in 2015—roughly 11 percent of the population. That makes China home to a third of the world’s diabetic population. The scale of this public health problem is huge, particularly because it comes at a time when the country’s health system as a whole is under reform, moving from a rudimen Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes And Diabetic Complications In China

Epidemiology Of Diabetes And Diabetic Complications In China

, Volume 61, Issue6 , pp 12491260 | Cite as Epidemiology of diabetes and diabetic complications in China The Peoples Republic of China (herein referred to as China) has witnessed one of the most dramatic rises in diabetes prevalence anywhere in the world. The latest epidemiological study suggests that approximately 11% of the population has diabetes, with a significant proportion remaining undiagnosed. Risk factors for diabetes in the Chinese population are similar to those in other populations, though gestational diabetes and young-onset diabetes is becoming increasingly common. Data on the prevalence of diabetic complications remain limited, though cardiorenal complications account for significant morbidity and mortality. Other diabetes-related comorbidities are becoming increasingly common, with cancer emerging as a major cause of mortality among individuals with diabetes. There are many challenges and obstacles that impede effective diabetes prevention and the delivery of care, though much progress has occurred over recent years. Lessons learnt from how China has responded to the challenges posed by the diabetes epidemic will be invaluable for other countries facing the many threats of diabetes and its complications. ChinaCoronary heart diseaseDiabetesDiabetic kidney diseaseEpidemiologyGeneticsGestational diabetesObesityReviewRisk factors International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups The online version of this article ( ) contains a slideset of the figures for download, which is available to authorised users. A correction to this article is available online at . The global epidemic of diabetes currently affects more than 440 million individuals. The Asia Pacific region has the largest number of people with diabetes and the prevalence of diabe Continue reading >>

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