diabetestalk.net

Diabetes In Babies Nhs

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 1 diabetes. Other types of diabetes are covered separately (read about type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes, which affects some women during pregnancy). Symptoms of diabetes Typical symptoms of type 1 diabetes are: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk The symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually develop very quickly in young people (over a few days or weeks). In adults, the symptoms often take longer to develop (a few months). Read more about the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. These symptoms occur because the lack of insulin means that glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible, because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Find your local GP service Read about how type 1 diabetes is diagnosed. Causes of type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which means your immune system attacks healthy body tissue by mistake. In this case, it attacks the cells in your pancreas. Your damaged pancreas is then unable to produce insulin. So, glucose cannot be moved out of your bloodstream and into your cells. Type 1 diabetes is o Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Babies

Diabetes In Babies

What is diabetes in a baby? Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects the body’s ability to process blood sugar. There are two subtypes of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1, sometimes called juvenile diabetes, is the kind that affects babies and toddlers. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is not known, but it is believed that the body destroys the cells that normally make insulin, a hormone that keeps blood sugar levels in check. Because the body can’t make insulin (or adequate amounts of insulin), blood sugar levels can skyrocket, causing damage to the organs of the body — but only if left unchecked. If blood sugar levels are well-controlled, though, your child’s risk of organ damage is low. Today, type 1 diabetes is considered a manageable, chronic condition. “Having diabetes does not mean that your child can’t play sports or join any clubs or activities when she’s older. It doesn’t mean that she won’t be able to have babies,” says Natasha Burgert, MD, FAAP, pediatrician at Pediatric Associates in Kansas City, Missouri. “They can fully participate in all of the usual major life milestones.” What are the symptoms of diabetes in babies? Weight loss is often the first symptom of diabetes in young children. “Weight is a vital sign in infants, and kids who have type 1 diabetes will be eating regularly, perhaps even more than average, but will be unable to gain weight,” Burgert says. Unexplained vomiting may also be a symptom of diabetes. When a child’s blood sugar rises (because there’s not enough insulin in the body to keep it under control), she may throw up increasing amounts over a three- or four-day period for no apparent reason. If your child has been vomiting, but has no other symptoms of stomach illness, such as a fever or diarrh Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 1

Diabetes, Type 1

Introduction Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin Type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body’s cells don't react to insulin This topic is about type 1 diabetes. Other types of diabetes are covered separately (read about type 2 diabetes. and gestational diabetes, which affects some women during pregnancy). Diabetes symptoms Typical symptoms of type 1 diabetes are: passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk The symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually develop very quickly in young people (over a few days or weeks). In adults, the symptoms often take longer to develop (a few months). Read more about the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. These symptoms occur because the lack of insulin means that glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible, because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Read about how type 1 diabetes is diagnosed. Causes of type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which means your immune system attacks healthy body tissue by mistake. In this case, it attacks the cells in your pancreas. Your damaged pancreas is then unable to produce insulin. So, glucose cannot be moved out of your bloodstream and into your cells. Type 1 diabetes is often inherited (runs in families), so the Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Diabetes And Pregnancy Nutrition And Dietetics Department

Healthy Eating For Diabetes And Pregnancy Nutrition And Dietetics Department

Patient information ©Barts Health NHS Trust Switchboard: 020 3416 5000 www.bartshealth.nhs.uk Name: Date: Dietitian: Contact Number: Hospital site: Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) Please contact us if you need general information or advice about Trust services. www.bartshealth.nhs.uk/pals Large print and other languages For this leaflet in large print, please speak to your clinical team. For help interpreting this leaflet in other languages, please ring 020 8223 8934. Te informacje mogÄ… zostać na żądanie przedstawione w formatach alternatywnych, takich jak Å‚atwy do czytania lub dużą czcionkÄ…, i w różnych jÄ™zykach. Prosimy o kontakt pod numerem 02082238934. Macluumaadkan waxaa lagu heli karaa qaabab kale, sida akhriska fudud ama daabacaadda wayn, oo waxaa lagu heli karaa luqaddo kale, marka la codsado. Fadlan la xidhiidh 02082238934. à¦à¦‡ , ঠ। 02082238934। Bu bilgiler, okuması kolay veya büyük baskılar gibi alternatif biçimlerde ve talep üzerine alternatif dillerde de sunulabilir. Ä°rtibat için lütfen 02082238934 numaralı telefondan ulaşın. ÙˆÙØŒ میں دستیاب کرایا جا سکتا اس معلومات Ú©Ùˆ متبادل Ø´Ú©Ù„ØŒ جیسے، Ù¾Ú‘Ú¾Ù†Û’ میں آسان یا بڑے Øر ÛÛ’ØŒ اور درخواست کرنے پر اسے متبادل زبان میں بھی دستیاب کرایا جا سکتا ÛÛ’Û” Ø¨Ø±Ø§Û Ù…Ûربانی پر Ø±Ø§Ø¨Ø·Û Ú©Ø± Continue reading >>

Steroid Induced Diabetes

Steroid Induced Diabetes

Steroids are hormonal chemical messengers that are produced naturally in the body by the adrenal glands (which are just above each kidney) and by the reproductive organs. Man-made versions of these hormonal substances are used to treat a wide range of illnesses and medical conditions. They damp down the immune system so that, for instance, it does not fight a transplanted organ. Steroids are also used to treat auto-immune conditions, where the body starts to attack itself after mistakenly recognising its cells as the enemy. As well as damping down the immune system, very high doses of steroids may have other effects on the body, such as weight gain and thinning of the bones when taken for a long period of time. They may also affect how the body controls insulin. Insulin is a hormone, which controls the concentration of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin is released by beta-cells in the pancreas. Normally, the beta-cells release insulin in response to the concentration of glucose in the blood. Glucose is thebodys energy source and the insulin transports the glucose into the cells where it is needed. When there is a high concentration of blood glucose, the beta-cells release more insulin to allow the glucose to be absorbed from the blood. If there is a low concentration of glucose, the betacells release a much smaller amount of insulin or even switch off insulin production. This keeps the blood glucose concentration balanced and at the right level for the rest of the body to function normally. How do steroids induce or bring on diabetes? Normally, the liver reduces the amount of glucose it releases in response to insulin. Steroids make the liver less sensitive to insulin so it carries on releasing glucose even if the pancreas is releasing insulin. Steroids also stop g Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Introduction Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin Type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body’s cells don't react to insulin This topic is about type 1 diabetes. Read more about type 2 diabetes Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear following birth. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible, because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. You should therefore visit your GP if you have symptoms, which include feeling thirsty, passing urine more often than usual and feeling tired all the time (see the list below for more diabetes symptoms). Type 1 and type 2 diabetes Type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, but usually appears before the age of 40, particularly in childhood. Around 10% of all diabetes is type 1, but it's the most common type of childhood diabetes. This is why it's sometimes called juvenile diabetes or early-onset diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas (a small gland behind the stomach) doesn't produce any insulin – the hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. This is why it's also sometimes called insulin-dependent diabetes. If the amount of glucose in the blood is too high, it can, over time, seriously damage the body's organs. In type 2 diabetes, the body either doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. Around 90% of adults with diabetes have type 2, and it tends to develop l Continue reading >>

Would You Know The Signs Of Diabetes In Your Child?

Would You Know The Signs Of Diabetes In Your Child?

Most parents are unlikely to spot the tell tale signs of diabetes in their children according to a survey by Diabetes UK, which found that only 1 in 10 of the parents questioned were familiar with the key symptoms of the disease. This lack of awareness, compounded by the fact that doctors often misattribute symptoms to other conditions, means that around a quarter of children with diabetes are only diagnosed once they are admitted to hospital in a coma or with other life-threatening complications. There are two distinct types of diabetes and concerns about misdiagnosis in children and young adults centre on Type 1 – where the insulin producing cells in the body are destroyed, leaving the person unable to control their blood sugar levels which rise alarmingly. Type 2 diabetes is much more common and tends to come on later in life and is closely associated with obesity. People with Type 2 diabetes still produce insulin but it either stops working as effectively as it used to, or they don’t produce enough to maintain good blood sugar control. The net result of both types is the same – blood sugar levels rise. In Type 2 this tends to be over months or even years, but in Type 1 the changes tend to be much more rapid leading to serious metabolic disturbance that can be fatal if not picked up and treated promptly. Diabetes UK wants every parent to be aware of the danger signs, which it has labelled the 4Ts: Toilet, Thirsty, Tired and Thinner. As blood sugar levels start to rise in early Type 1 diabetes the child often starts peeing more than normal, drinks more because they are thirsty, lacks their normal energy and loses weight. Other clues include bedwetting, constipation, thrush, and headaches or vomiting. For more information you can visit Diabetes UK. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Overview Type 1 diabetes in children is a condition in which your child's body no longer produces an important hormone (insulin). Your child needs insulin to survive, so you'll have to replace the missing insulin. Type 1 diabetes in children used to be known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children can be overwhelming at first. Suddenly you and your child — depending on his or her age — must learn how to give injections, count carbohydrates and monitor blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes in children requires consistent care. But advances in blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery have improved the daily management of the condition. Symptoms The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. These signs and symptoms include: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your child's bloodstream pulls fluid from tissues. As a result your child might be thirsty — and drink and urinate more than usual. A young, toilet-trained child might suddenly experience bed-wetting. Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs lack energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign of type 1 diabetes to be noticed in children. Fatigue. Lack of sugar in your child's cells might make him or her tired and lethargic. Irritability or behavior changes. In addition to mood problems, your child might suddenly have a decline in performance at school. Fruity-smelling breath. Bu Continue reading >>

Doctors Warn Of 'lack Of Awareness' Of Child Diabetes Among Uk Health Professionals

Doctors Warn Of 'lack Of Awareness' Of Child Diabetes Among Uk Health Professionals

Doctors warn of 'lack of awareness' of child diabetes among UK health professionals Doctors in Southampton and Oxford have warned that UK health professionals failure to recognise the symptoms of type 1 diabetes is putting childrens lives at risk. Dr Justin Davies, a consultant paediatric endocrinologist at Southampton Childrens Hospital, said a lack of awareness meant patients were being sent to multiple clinicians, having unnecessary investigations, missing out on crucial finger-prick blood tests and, ultimately, receiving misdiagnoses. When treatment with insulin is delayed, patients with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of a potentially fatal complication diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which occurs when the body breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel in the absence of insulin. DKA is present in 25% of the 2,000 children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes annually in the UK and is responsible for ten deaths a year. Despite improvements in diabetes care leading to increased life expectancy, the mortality rate for children with type 1 diabetes remains higher than the general population and DKA is the leading cause of death, explained Dr Davies. Unfortunately, the incidence of DKA in a quarter of patients at diagnosis is relatively unchanged from reports over the past 20 years and nearly twice as high as that observed in Sweden. This is a major concern. In the largest study of its kind, published in the May edition of the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood, the research team examined the symptoms in the lead up to the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in 261 children aged between eight months and 16 years at 75 hospitals in England, Wales and Northern Ireland before diagnosis. Dr Davies said while a quarter of all children presented with DKA at diagnosi Continue reading >>

Dartford And Gravesham Nhs Trust - Gestational Diabetes

Dartford And Gravesham Nhs Trust - Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 2.8 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 850,000 people who have the condition but dont know it. Diabetes is a condition where the amount of glucose in your blood is too high because the body cannot use it properly. This is because the pancreas does not produce any insulin, or not enough, to help glucose enter your bodys cells or the insulin that is produced does not work properly (known as insulin resistance).Insulin is the hormone produced by the pancreas that allows glucose to enter the bodys cells, where it is used as fuel for energy so we can work, play and generally live our lives. It is vital for life. Glucose comes from digesting carbohydrate and is also produced by the liver. Carbohydrate comes from many different kinds of foods and drink, including starchy foods such as bread, potatoes, rice, pasta and chapatis; fruit; some dairy products; sugar and other sweet foods. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood and isnt able to be used as fuel. During your Pregnancy, Darent Valley Hospital can offer and provide great care for you and your baby and depending on which type of Diabetes you have will determine the Care Pathway we choose for you and tailor it towards your individual needs. If you have diabetes and you are considering starting a family, we offer a pre conceptual service in the Diabetes Centre and would love to see you in order to get good glycaemic control before you discover you are pregnant. All you need to do is discuss with your GP your plans for a future family and ask him/her to refer you to the pre-conceptual clinic at Darent Valley Hospital. It is important to have good glycaemic control prior to be Continue reading >>

Petition Calls For Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms To Be Included In Nhs Red Book

Petition Calls For Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms To Be Included In Nhs Red Book

Tagged with diabetic ketoacidosis , NHS , Personal Child Health Record A petition has been launched to highlight the dangers of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes, and why the symptoms should be made clear to new parents. The petition , set up by Emma Warrington, calls for the symptoms of type 1 diabetes to be included in the Personal Child Health Record given to parents. This is also known as the Red Book, and is provided by the NHS when a newborn child is roughly 10 days old. It should be used by parents until the child is around four years old, and includes information on immunisations, growth charts, screening and routine reviews. Parents need to take the Red Book with them to GP and clinic appointments, as well as any time their child has to go to A&E. It serves as an invaluable tool in raising a child, and Warrington states just why including the symptoms of type 1 diabetes is so important. A child is five times more likely to be diagnosed with type 1 diabetes than meningitis, yet the symptoms are not documented in the red baby book that every new parent is given. If left untreated, or if diagnosed late children die of diabetic ketoacidosis, this is FACT. It is a strong point. Especially as one in six parents in the United Kingdom are unaware when their child displays the symptoms of type 1 diabetes according to a 2014 poll. The symptoms of hyperglycemia, which are listed below, can lead to type 1 diabetes, but may understandably be attributed by parents and family members to a cold or the flu. It can be extremely dangerous if type 1 diabetes is left untreated for too long, though. Roughly one in four children diagnosed with type 1 are suffering with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which can result in coma or death if not treated quickly. In July, five-year-old Kycie Terry Continue reading >>

Can A Mother's Diet Give Her Child Diabetes?

Can A Mother's Diet Give Her Child Diabetes?

“A poor diet during pregnancy may increase the risk of a woman’s children and grandchildren developing type 2 diabetes in later life”, reported the Daily Mail. It said a study has suggested that mothers who eat unhealthily could “programme” susceptibility into the cells of their unborn baby. This genetic vulnerability could then be passed down to future generations. This is good quality research, but it was in rats and the results are preliminary. Further research is needed before it can be established that the process suggested happens in humans. In addition, this study did not assess glucose metabolism or regulation as an outcome, even in rats, and the implication of its findings for the development of diabetes is unclear. Do you find this interesting? Fancy publishing your thoughts on online journal club? Email [email protected] This study should not cause undue concern for pregnant women. There are, however, well established reasons for a healthy diet during pregnancy. Being overweight is a risk factor for glucose intolerance and gestational diabetes for mothers. The claim by the Daily Mail that the study found a mother’s diet increases risk for her grandchildren is unsubstantiated, even in rats. The study gave no indication that the effects of maternal diet on offspring are passed on to subsequent generations. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the University of Cambridge, Malmö University in Sweden, the National Cancer Institute at Frederick in the USA, the Medicines Research Centre in Stevenage and the University of Birmingham Medical School. The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Several news sources covered this study. The Express, Continue reading >>

Trust Doctor Urges Parents To Be Aware Of Signs & Symptoms Of Diabetes Type 1

Trust Doctor Urges Parents To Be Aware Of Signs & Symptoms Of Diabetes Type 1

As part of National Diabetes Week, Dr Bill Lamb a paediatric diabetes specialist at County Durham and Darlington NHS Trust, is joining NHS Diabetes in urging parents to be aware of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children. Type 1 diabetes can occur in any child at any age, even in babies and toddlers, and is not a genetic or inherited disorder. Often the symptoms go unrecognised and the disease is only diagnosed when the child becomes critically ill with a potentially life threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children include: • feeling very thirsty all the time • passing urine very frequently and wetting the bed • weight loss • excessive, unexplained tiredness • blurred vision • sweet or fruity smelling breath. NHS Diabetes is a national organisation supporting improvement in diabetes services and working to embed safe, evidence-based best practice across the diabetes community. Anna Morton, Director of NHS Diabetes, said: "All too often children are becoming seriously ill before they are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. That's why we are working with our paediatric diabetes network to ensure that healthcare professionals are alert to the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children, and those children with the disease, no matter where they live in England, get access to the same high quality care." Dr Bill Lamb, a consultant paediatric diabetologist working in the Northern Region said: "Sadly we are seeing too many children admitted to hospital in diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. DKA is a life threatening condition, and tragically children do die as a result. But it is preventable. That's why I am urging parents to be alert to the symptoms - excessive thirst, going to the toilet very frequently, weight los Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children: What You Need To Know

Diabetes In Children: What You Need To Know

If your child has been diagnosed with diabetes, there's a lot for you both to get your head around. With new stats showing that Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in children, here are some facts to help you understand the condition, plus what to do if you're worried your child may be diabetic. Shocking figures have shown an increase in diabetes in children, and the condition is affecting children as young as 5. While Type 2 diabetes is more commonly associated with adults (in the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have Type 2), it is ow affecting more and more children. Read on to find out more about diabetes. What is diabetes? The NHS describes diabetes as 'a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high.' Usually, the hormone insulin carefully regulates the amount of glucose in our blood and converts the glucose into energy to 'fuel' the cells in our bodies. Glucose comes from the digestion of starchy foods, such as bread, rice, potatoes and sweet foods. But if a person is diabetic they are not able to make enough - or any - insulin to convert the glucose. This means that glucose from food is not converted into energy but stays locked outside the cells, making a person feel tired, run-down and generally unwell. As cells are deprived of energy, the body starts to look elsewhere, breaking down fat and protein stores (as a result people with diabetes may lose significant amounts of weight as this process occurs). Unused glucose is passed out of the body in urine, increasing the need to pass urine and increasing thirst. Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes: what's the difference? There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. In Type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin. Typ Continue reading >>

What Is Gestational Diabetes?

What Is Gestational Diabetes?

Patient Information - 1 - Maternity Services GESTATIONAL DIABETES Gestational diabetes (GDM) is the term used to describe diabetes that is first diagnosed during pregnancy, usually through a blood test at 24–28 weeks into pregnancy. Usually it will disappear after the baby is born but will usually re-occur in any later pregnancies. With good management of gestational diabetes, you can increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and baby. WHY DO WOMEN DEVELOP GDM The hormones produced during pregnancy can make it difficult for your body to use insulin properly, putting you at an increased risk of insulin resistance. And, because pregnancy places a heavy demand on the body, some women are less able to produce enough insulin to overcome this resistance. This makes it difficult to use glucose properly for energy, so the glucose remains in the blood and the levels rise, leading to gestational diabetes. Women most at risk of developing gestational diabetes are those who:  Are overweight or obese  Have a family history of diabetes  Have had a previous ‘big’ baby, over 4.5kg.  Are from certain ethnic backgrounds HOW DOES GDM AFFECT MY BABY? If your blood sugar levels are consistently high sugar will cross over to the baby via the placenta. Baby will produce high levels of insulin which will make him or her grow rapidly. They can get very large around the middle and the top half of their body this can make delivery of the baby difficult and can mean that the shoulders get stuck during delivery. You are more likely to have an Induction of your labour or a caesarean birth. As a result of the baby producing too much insulin before he/she is born, they may have a low blood sugar until they regulate their own insulin production. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes