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Diabetes In Animals Diet

Management Of Diabetes Mellitus - Nutrition For Diabetic Pets

Management Of Diabetes Mellitus - Nutrition For Diabetic Pets

The diet must provide all the nutritional needs of the animal and should minimize post-prandial fluctuations in blood glucose. The diet should be consistent from day to day to avoid changes in insulin requirements. Ideally the diet for a diabetic pet diet should supply more than 40% of the calories from carbohydrates and less than 25% of the calories from fat. A high quality, highly digestible protein source (e.g. chicken, lamb, etc.) is preferable to protein from cereal sources (soya bean meal, corn gluten meal). The calorific value should maintain or reach the ideal body weight. A diet and feeding routine should be chosen that suit both the owner and their diabetic pet. Clean drinking water should be available at all times. A reduction in excessive water consumption indicates successful management of the diabetes mellitus. In dogs and cats that are underweight or overweight it is desirable that the ideal body weight is reached by gradual weight gain or loss. In underweight animals very calorie dense diets should be avoided, especially those that are high in soluble carbohydrates. Obesity contributes to insulin resistance. Overweight dogs and cats should lose weight in a gradual controlled fashion. Weight loss in obese animals decreases the insulin requirement. Diets designed to promote weight loss are high fiber diets and are suitable for feeding to diabetic pets. See Feeding Diabetic Dogs and Feeding Diabetic Cats for species specific information. The following pet-food companies produce balanced diets formulated for diabetic dogs and cats. For more information click on each company name to reach their website: Continue reading >>

2010 Aaha Diabetes Management Guidelines For Dogs And Cats

2010 Aaha Diabetes Management Guidelines For Dogs And Cats

Renee Rucinsky, DVM, ABVP (Feline) (Chair) | Audrey Cook, BVM&:S, MRCVS, Diplomate ACVIM-SAIM, Diplomate ECVIM-CA | Steve Haley, DVM | Richard Nelson, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM | Debra L. Zoran, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM | Melanie Poundstone, DVM, ABVP - Download PDF - Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a treatable condition that requires a committed effort by veterinarian and client. This document provides current recommendations for the treatment of diabetes in dogs and cats. Treatment of DM is a combination of art and science, due in part to the many factors that affect the diabetic state and the animal's response. Each animal needs individualized, frequent reassessment, and treatment may be modified based on response. In both dogs and cats, DM is caused by loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells. In the dog, beta cell loss tends to be rapid and progressive, and it is usually due to immune-mediated destruction, vacuolar degeneration, or pancreatitis.1 Intact females may be transiently diabetic due to the insulin-resistant effects of the diestrus phase. In the cat, loss or dysfunction of beta cells is the result of insulin resistance, islet amyloidosis, or chronic lymphoplasmacytic pancreatitis.2 Risk factors for both dogs and cats include insulin resistance caused by obesity, other diseases (e.g., acromegaly in cats, hyperadrenocorticism in dogs), or medications (e.g., steroids, progestins). Genetics is a suspected risk factor, and certain breeds of dogs (Australian terriers, beagles, Samoyeds, keeshonden3) and cats (Burmese4) are more susceptible. Regardless of the underlying etiology, diabetic dogs and cats are hyperglycemic and glycosuric, which leads to the classic clinical signs of polyuria, polydipsia (PU/PD), polyphagia, and weight loss. Increased fat mobi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog: Tips To Manage His Diet

Diabetic Dog: Tips To Manage His Diet

So, your dog has diabetes. Take a deep breath. With good care, your companion can lead a long, healthy life. Like humans, when dogs have diabetes, staying trim is key. If your dog is overweight, losing some pounds can help his cells better use insulin, a hormone that keeps blood sugar levels in check. That makes it easier for his body to turn food into fuel. The goal for any pooch with diabetes is to keep blood sugar (or glucose) levels as close to normal as possible. This helps your dog feel good and makes it less likely he'll get diabetes-related complications, such as vision-clouding cataracts and urinary tract infections. Your veterinarian will determine how many calories your dog needs every day, based on his weight and activity level. Once you know that number, it's important to keep a close eye on what he eats and how much. Researchers are still exploring what diet is best for dogs with diabetes. Most vets recommend a high-fiber, low-fat diet. Fiber slows the entrance of glucose into the bloodstream and helps your dog feel full. Low-fat foods have fewer calories. Together, the diet can help your dog eat less and lose weight. But make sure your pooch drinks plenty of water. Fiber takes water from the body, and that can cause constipation and other problems. Most dogs do fine with food you can buy at the store. But your vet may recommend prescription dog food or a homemade diet developed by a veterinary nutritionist. Your vet can tell you the best way to go about changing your dog's food. Even the best diet won’t help if your dog doesn’t eat it, though -- and you can't give insulin to a dog on an empty stomach. It can make him very sick. If your dog isn't eating as much, it could be because he doesn't like the food. It could also mean he has another problem, or Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes is more common in older pets, but it can also occur in younger or pregnant pets. The disease is more manageable if it is detected early and managed with the help of your veterinarian. The good news is that with proper monitoring, treatment, and diet and exercise, diabetic pets can lead long and happy lives. Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a condition that occurs when the body can not use glucose (a type of sugar) normally. Glucose is the main source of energy for the body’s cells. The levels of glucose in the blood are primarily controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made by the pancreas. As food passes through the intestines during digestion, sugars are one of the nutrients absorbed from the food. The sugars are transported into the cells that line the intestines and are converted into simple sugars (including) glucose. The simple sugars are then absorbed into the bloodstream for circulation and delivery to the whole body’s tissues and cells. Insulin is required for the transfer of glucose from the bloodstream to the cells. If there is not enough insulin or the body is unable to use the insulin, glucose accumulates in high levels in the blood – a condition called hyperglycemia. When the blood glucose reaches a certain level, the glucose overflows into the urine (this is called glucosuria) and draws large volumes of water with it. This is why diabetic pets often drink more water and urinate more frequently and in larger amounts. In diabetics, regardless of the source of the sugar or the amount of sugar in the blood, there is not enough glucose transported into the body’s cells. As a result, there is not enough energy for the cells to function normally, and, the tissues become starved for energy. This state of metabolic “starvation” caus Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For A Diabetic Dog

Diet Tips For A Diabetic Dog

Once a dog is diagnosed with diabetes they usually remain diabetic. While there are feeding and dietary strategies that can help keep their glucose levels low and well-controlled, they will usually require insulin injections lifelong. An excellent diet choice for a diabetic dog is a meat-based high protein food that is moderately fat and carbohydrate restricted. Carbohydrates, if included, should be low glycemic (for example, barley or sorghum). Ideally, at least 30 to 40% of the calories in your diabetic dog's food would come from protein and less than 30% of calories would come from fat and carbohydrates each. Further dietary fat restriction may be necessary if your diabetic dog has pancreatitis or blood fat elevations. Options to consider include Nature's Variety Instinct, Wysong, and Halo. Several studies indicate that high or moderately high–fiber diets may help some diabetics by minimizing their post–eating blood sugar fluctuations. While this is true for SOME dogs, a clear clinical benefit has not been shown for the majority of diabetic dogs. Sometimes high fiber diets will cause inappropriate weight loss (in a thin diabetic) and should be avoided. High fiber diets may also be associated with undesirable intestinal side effects such as decreased appetite (due to poor palatability), flatulence and diarrhea or constipation. If your dog is very overweight or obese and in need of weight loss, you might consider a diet with higher fiber to aid in weight loss. Instead of changing to a high fiber diet formulation (which often contains inferior ingredients), you can also consider adding supplemental fiber to your dog's regular diabetic food in order to increase the overall fiber content while still maintaining a high quality food. To best control your diabetic dog's Continue reading >>

Hill's® Science Diet® Youthful Vitality Adult 7+ Small & Toy Breed Chicken & Rice Recipe Dog Food

Hill's® Science Diet® Youthful Vitality Adult 7+ Small & Toy Breed Chicken & Rice Recipe Dog Food

Diabetes mellitus is a condition that develops when your dog cannot use sugar (glucose) effectively and control the sugar level in the blood. Insulin, which is made in the pancreas, is essential for regulating the use and storage of blood glucose. Insufficient insulin production is potentially life threatening. Just like in humans, diabetes in dogs is serious, but manageable. There are two types of diabetes, and although there is no cure, dogs with either type can be successfully managed through nutrition, exercise, and if necessary, regular insulin medication. With the right food and advice from your veterinarian, your diabetic dog can still enjoy a happy, active life. What causes diabetes? A reduction in insulin production is usually caused by damage to the pancreas. The pancreas is responsible for producing the proper amount of insulin to control sugar levels. In some dogs hormonal changes or medications can reduce the effect of insulin. If your dog's pancreas is damaged, long-term and potentially life-threatening symptoms could occur and must be managed. Factors that increase the chance of your dog developing diabetes include: Body condition: Overweight or obese dogs are more likely to develop diabetes. Age: Dogs can develop diabetes at any age, but the peak onset is around 8 years. Gender: Females are twice as likely to develop diabetes. Breed: Some breeds of dogs, such as Samoyeds, miniature schnauzers, miniature poodles and bichon frise are more predisposed to diabetes than others. Other factors could include poor nutrition, hormonal abnormalities and stress. Does my dog have diabetes? The signs of diabetes are difficult to recognize because they are similar to those of other disorders like kidney disease. Your veterinarian may also need to perform tests to ensur Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pets

Diabetes And Pets

Tweet Pets such as cats and dogs can also develop diabetes. All pet owners worry about their animals so knowing whether or not your dog or cat is showing symptoms of diabetes can help save their life. What are the causes of diabetes in animals? Just like in humans, pets with diabetes may not be able to produce enough insulin, or possibly their bodies do not allow them to use insulin properly. Insulin is produced by the pancreas, and allows glucose in the blood to enter cells, allowing the body to properly function. Just like people, pets can suffer from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of diabetes in animals? Diabetes symptoms and the complications of the disease are also similar to humans. The following symptoms could indicate that your animal has diabetes. Diabetes symptoms in pets Symptoms in pets can include: Weight loss, often despite an increased appetite Excessive thirst and urination Breakdown of body fat and development of ketacidosis Lower appetite Pungent breath with a chemical smell Complications associated with diabetes My animal looks very sick, could this be pet diabetes? Your pet may be in the throes of hypoglycaemia or low blood sugar. Hypoglycaemia can occur in animals due to insulin overdose. The symptoms of hypoglycaemia include the following: Seizure Wobbliness Weakness Dullness Sleepiness Restlessness Coma When pets are hypoglycaemic they should never be left alone overnight. The complications of untreated diabetes can be awful. These include cataract formation and loss of sight in dogs, and both nerve damage and hind-end weakness in cats. Diabetes treatment for pets Insulin is generally regarded as the benchmark treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Your vet can prescribe special insulin. Owners of diabetic pets shou Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Animals | Animal Wellness Magazine

Diabetes In Animals | Animal Wellness Magazine

Diabetes is not a death sentence. Here we breakdown five of the most common myths that surround this disease. Leah, a rescued Siberian Husky, made frequent trips throughout the day to her water bowl. When she started asking to go out at 5:30 a.m. every morning, however, her guardian suspected something was wrong and took Leah to her veterinarian. A urine test and follow up blood work revealed she had diabetes. Diabetes develops when the pancreas no longer produces adequate amounts of insulin. Without sufficient amounts of insulin, blood sugar cannot be released from the blood to reach your animals body tissues. Instead, it becomes trapped in the blood stream and spills over into the urine. Common symptoms of diabetes include a ravenous appetite, excessive thirst and urination coupled with weight loss. There are two types of Diabetes: Type I Insulin dependent, which more often affects canines and can be hereditary, and Type II, which is often linked to obesity and can often be controlled by diet alone. While diabetes can take its toll on your animals vision, kidneys and heart, and in some cases can prove fatal, many myths and propaganda surround this disease. In this article, we will reveal some truths about diabetes so you are empowered with clinical wisdom should it come your animals way. This is just plain untrue. The pancreas, one of the more important glands of the body, can often be rejuvenated and coaxed back into proper function through such things as a high fiber natural diet, increased exercise and a correct balance of vitamins, minerals, nutraceuticals and herbs. Often, this occurs after your veterinarian brings the disease under control with insulin. Then, over a period of time, as the body responds to improved nutrition, your veterinarian can reduce the dos Continue reading >>

Diet Plays An Important Role In Keeping Your Pet's Diabetes Well Regulated. Because Insulin Requirements Change Depending

Diet Plays An Important Role In Keeping Your Pet's Diabetes Well Regulated. Because Insulin Requirements Change Depending

Type of diet Food Comparisons Home Cooking Timing of meals Treats Tips for picky eaters or when a meal is refused References on the amount and type of food eaten, a consistent, high-quality diet that the pet will reliably eat is important. The healthier and more consistent the diet, the easier it will be to control the blood glucose. View sample bg charts showing the relationship between food and bg. Type of diet The ideal composition of the diet for diabetic pets has not been determined, and research continues in this area. However, many vets recommend a special diet that has a higher fiber content than commercially available foods. These special diets usually contain a greater amount of soluble fiber. Research in humans and in some animal studies shows that soluble fiber slows the absorption of glucose from the digestive system. This helps prevent a rapid rise in the blood glucose after a meal. You will see this referred to as postprandial (after eating) blood glucose. Several special diets are available by prescription from your veterinarian. Hills w/d is a commonly used prescription diet. Purina, Eukanuba, and other pet food manufacturers also make prescription diets. Another school of thought, particularly for diabetic cats, is to feed a higher protein diet. Purina has developed a prescription Diabetes Management Formula. Many diabet cat owners have reported that their cat requires less insulin when fed this diet compared to other diets. Purina provides a feeding plan to your veterinarian to help switch from normal or higher fiber diets to the higher protein diet while at the same time preventing insulin overdose. Some pets refuse to eat prescription foods, or the prescription foods may not be a good choice for your pet because of other health reasons. Many diabeti Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Type 1 Vs. Type 2

Diabetes In Dogs: Type 1 Vs. Type 2

By Hanie Elfenbein, DVM Diabetes in dogs is not a death sentence. It takes dedication, but your dog can still live a long, happy life. Diabetes means that the body is unable to use glucose (sugar) appropriately. This leads to high levels of sugar in the blood, which can cause many health problems. Just like humans, our pets can get both Type I and Type II diabetes. Type I diabetes is also known as insulin-deficiency. It is due to the body's inability to produce insulin. Insulin is normally produced in the pancreas and is important in helping cells use glucose (sugar), the basic energy source. Our digestive systems are designed to turn food into glucose for cells to use. Without insulin, glucose cannot get into cells. People and animals with Type I diabetes need to be given insulin so that their body can use glucose. Type II diabetes is known as insulin resistant diabetes. It happens when the pancreas makes insulin but the body's cells do not respond to the insulin. Sometimes Type II diabetes can be reversed through weight loss and improvements in diet and exercise. In our companions, dogs are more likely to develop Type I diabetes while cats are more likely to develop Type II diabetes. Some diseases and medications can also cause Type II diabetes in dogs. Fortunately for the animals with Type II diabetes, some will recover through diet and exercise. Unfortunately, once your pet develops Type I diabetes, it is not reversible. Causes of Canine Diabetes In dogs, Type I diabetes is caused by destruction of insulin producing cells in the pancreas. These cells die as a result of inflammation of the pancreas, known as pancreatitis. Some dog breeds are predisposed to chronic pancreatitis and diabetes, including Keeshonds and Samoyeds. Like humans and cats, obese dogs are at ris Continue reading >>

Diets For Diabetic Dogs

Diets For Diabetic Dogs

Diabetes and Insulin requirements for dogs Diabetes Mellitus is a significant and debilitating chronic disease that causes poor quality of life for both pets, and owners, and significantly reduces life expectancy. Diabetes in dogs and cats used to be quite a rare disease, but has been increasing in recent years to become a more common diagnosis. Diabetes in pets tends to be the insulin dependent type (as compared to type 2 diabetes in people), but is certainly more common in older pets, as it is in people. Diet does play a significant role in the development of diabetes in both pets and people. Signs of diabetes can vary, but most pets will primarily show an increase in drinking (and urinating), a very aggressive appetite (always hungry) and some gradual and progressive weight loss despite the good appetite. As the disease progresses to become toxic, affected pets will then lose their appetite, and show signs of vomiting and lethargy, and often will have a characteristic ‘acetone’ smell on their breath. Dogs and cats that present like this are in a critical condition, and are at a high risk of dying. Diabetes is caused by a failure of the body (special cells in the pancreas) to produce adequate insulin, which is required to allow cells in the body to absorb glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream. Diabetic patients end up with very high blood sugar, but with body cells starving from lack of sugar – this results in a long-term breakdown of body tissues (as a source of energy), and production of toxic metabolites (called keto-acidosis). Stabilising diabetic pets involves the use of specific insulin injections with a once or twice a day injection program, combined with very strict diets, exercise and feeding regimes. Well managed pets can remain stable for several year Continue reading >>

Nutrition In Diabetic Pets

Nutrition In Diabetic Pets

Insulin is only one component for good diabetes control. Diet is also very important. A diet must provide for all of your dog's or cat's nutritional needs and should minimize fluctuations in glucose concentrations. There are a number of prescription diets that have been specially formulated for the management of diabetic dogs and cats. These can be particularly useful for achieving weight loss in obese pets. However, many diabetic dogs and cats can be managed on a carefully controlled program using their normal diet. Diabetes control with a nonprescription diet is much easier if a complete, moist (canned) food is being fed to diabetic cats. Clean drinking water should be available at all times. A reduction in excessive water consumption indicates successful management of diabetes mellitus. Importance of an ideal body weight In pets that are underweight or overweight, pursue respective weight gain or loss to help your pet achieve its ideal body weight. In underweight animals, diets high in carbohydrates should be avoided. Obesity contributes to insulin resistance. Overweight pets should lose weight in a gradual, controlled fashion. Weight loss in obese animals decreases the insulin requirement. Prescription diets Complete prescription diets for diabetic pets are available from your veterinarian. Your veterinarian or veterinary technician will advise you on the correct type of diet to meet your pet's specific needs. For information about complete diets available for pets with diabetes mellitus, check out the following pet food companies: Hill's® Pet Nutrition Eukanuba® Special Pet Foods Royal Canin® Waltham® Purina® Essential features of a diet FOR DOGS The essential features of the diet should be: Consistent from day to day (to prevent unnecessary alterations in ins Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Dogs can have diabetes just like humans - both Type 1 and Type 2. Diabetic dogs are increasingly common, but the disease is entirely manageable unless left untreated. MY DOG HAS DIABETES: OVERVIEW 1. If your dog shows symptoms of diabetes (described below), seek veterinary care at once. 2. Work with your vet to determine the right type of insulin and the right dose for your individual dog. 3. Take your dog for frequent veterinary checkups. 4. Learn how to give insulin injections and reward your dog for accepting them. 5. Consistently feed your diabetic dog the same type of food at the same time of day. 6. Report any unusual symptoms or reactions to your vet. For years public health officials have reported a diabetes epidemic among America’s children and adults. At the same time, the rate of canine diabetes in America has more than tripled since 1970, so that today it affects about 1 in every 160 dogs. But while many human cases are caused and can be treated by diet, for dogs, diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires careful blood sugar monitoring and daily insulin injections. The medical term for the illness is diabetes mellitus (mellitus is a Latin term that means “honey sweet,” reflecting the elevated sugar levels the condition produces in urine and blood). Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin to metabolize food for energy, or when the body’s cells fail to utilize insulin properly. The pancreas’s inability to produce insulin is known in humans as type 1 (formerly called juvenile or insulin-dependent) diabetes. This is analogous to the type that affects virtually all dogs. Dogs can also develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Type 2 (formerly adult onset) diabetes, which is the result of insulin resistance often l Continue reading >>

The Pet Food Industry Association Of Australia

The Pet Food Industry Association Of Australia

Read more or download a print friendly PDF file . Diabetes mellitus most commonly occurs in middle age to older dogs and cats, but occasionally occurs in young animals. In both dogs and cats Diabetes Mellitus is often caused by destruction or abnormal function of the pancreas, an organ that is located in the abdomen, close to the small intestine. Certain conditions can predispose a dog or cat to developing diabetes. Animals (particularly cats) that are overweight or those with inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis) are considered more likely to develop diabetes. Genetics is also considered to be a risk factor and certain breeds of dogs (reports include Miniature Poodles, Dachshunds, Schnauzers, Cairn Terriers, Beagles, Samoyeds) and Burmese cats are recognised as being more susceptible to developing Diabetes Mellitus, however, any breed can be affected. Animals with DM may have a variety of signs depending on the extent of their blood glucose levels and related diseases (e.g pancreatitis). Dogs and cats that are in the early stage of developing DM often appear healthy, have a stable weight and are usually identified only when routine blood and urine tests are performed for other reasons. The onset of clinical signs due to diabetes can be quite subtle. Disease progression and complications: why treatment is important Untreated diabetic pets are more likely to develop infections and are at increased risk of bladder, kidney, or skin infections. Diabetic dogs, and more rarely cats, can develop cataracts in the eyes and owners might notice that their pet's eyes have a cloudy or bluish appearance. Cataracts are caused by the accumulation of water in the lens and can lead to blindness. Less common signs of diabetes are weakness or abnormal gait due to nerves or muscles n Continue reading >>

Nutritional Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

Nutritional Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

Nutritional Management of Diabetes Mellitus Nutritional Management of Diabetes Mellitus The goal in treating your pet's diabetes mellitus is to keep your dog or cat happy and to provide them as stable of life as possible. Nutrition is an integral part of the management of any diabetic patient. This is because diabetes mellitus is caused by an absence or a reduction in the activity of insulin, the substance that moves sugar into the body's cells for use as an energy source. In order to reach our overall objective of maintaining your pet's quality of life, there are several important goals that we try to achieve with regard to nutritional management of the disease. These goals include; 1) maintenance of food intake to provide adequate calories, 2) maintenance of a healthy body weight and body condition, 3) weight loss if indicated and 4) the reduction or elimination of the clinical signs of diabetes, while at the same time avoiding the common complications of the disease. Controlling blood glucose (or sugar) concentrations within a healthy range is important in achieving these goals. This can be done using medication (usually insulin or an oral drug), nutrition, or a combination of both. The best approach varies from patient to patient, and it may take some time to determine which approach meets your pet's unique needs. In some cases your veterinarian may choose to change your pet to a special prescription diet to help manage their diabetes. Fiber-enhanced foods have been used successfully in the management of both canine and feline patients with diabetes mellitus for years. Fiber is proposed to promote a slower digestion and absorption of dietary carbohydrates (the major provider of blood glucose or sugar in the food), reducing peaks in blood sugar after meals. Some typ Continue reading >>

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