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Diabetes In 30 Year Olds

Diabetes In Men

Diabetes In Men

The rates of diabetes have dramatically increased in all states. Twenty-six million children and adults in the United States -- 8% of the population -- have diabetes. The risk for type 2 diabetes typically increases with age. In the absence of risks, testing should begin after age 45. One of the biggest jumps in type 2 diabetes was among men. The risk factors for type 2 diabetes include: a sedentary lifestyle a diet high in sugar and refined carbohydrates and low in fiber and whole grains a history of type 2 diabetes in your immediate family (mother, father, sister, or brother) African-Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, Native Alaskans, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders also have an increased risk. Having diabetes, in turn, increases the danger of heart disease, as well as a range of problems associated with impaired circulation, such as eye disease and nerve damage. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when the body can't control blood glucose levels properly. Normally, the digestive tract breaks down food into glucose, a form of sugar. After being absorbed, it is released into the blood. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, stimulates cells to absorb glucose from the bloodstream and use it for energy. Type 1 diabetes, which typically shows up in childhood, is caused when the immune system mistakenly attacks insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes occurs when tissues in the body gradually become resistant to the effect of insulin. The pancreas responds by churning out more of the hormone. But eventually it can't keep up, and blood sugar levels begin to climb. That's bad for many reasons. High glucose levels damage nerve and blood vessels, leading to heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, and gum infections. Advanced type 2 d Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms

Signs & Symptoms

Early Detection It is important to know the signs and symptoms of diabetes to detect the disease early and get it under control before any irreversible damage is done to the body. Recent studies indicate that early detection and treatment of diabetes can decrease the chance of developing complications from the disease. Diabetes has often been referred to as a "silent disease" for two reasons: 1) Many people with Type 2 diabetes walk around with symptoms for many years, but are not diagnosed until they develop a complication of the disease, such as blindness, kidney disease, or heart disease; 2) There are no specific physical manifestations in individuals with diabetes. Therefore, unless a person chooses to disclose their disease, it is possible that friends and even family members may be unaware of a person's diagnosis. Diabetes is detected through a blood glucose test, and experts recommend that Americans over age 35 with a family history of diabetes or other risk factors (such as being overweight) should consider asking their physicians for a blood test annually. The earlier diabetes is detected, the earlier complications may be treated and/or prevented. Common signs/symptoms (for Type 1, Type 2, Type 1.5, Pre-diabetes, Gestational Diabetes) Unexplained weight loss is one of the common type 1 diabetes symptoms in women. With this type of diabetes, the body is unable to use all the calories that the food provides, even though the person follows a healthy diet. Due to this, the person loses weight, even without trying to do so. Another symptom that is seen in both types of diabetes is the feeling the need to visit the washroom frequently. The body tries to get rid of the excess sugar through the urine and hence, one feels the need to urinate within very short periods of Continue reading >>

Case Study: A 30-year-old Man With Metformin-treated Newly Diagnosed Diabetes And Abdominal Pain

Case Study: A 30-year-old Man With Metformin-treated Newly Diagnosed Diabetes And Abdominal Pain

M.P. is a 30-year-old man who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 2 weeks before admission to the hospital. He has a strong family history of type 2 diabetes. He smokes heavily (> 20 cigarettes/day) and admits to some alcohol consumption. His primary care physician had started him on metformin, 500 mg three times daily. There were no complications of diabetes at the time of presentation. Two days before his admission, he developed generalized abdominal discomfort, watery diarrhea, and bilious vomiting. He denied any history suggestive of food poisoning or recent surgery. He was apyrexial on admission. His blood pressure was 170/101 mmHg, pulse was 100 bpm, and temperature was 98.9°F. There were no signs suggestive of peritonitis, and his abdomen was soft without guarding. He had deep-seated tenderness in the epigastric region. Initial investigations showed a white blood count of 25.9 × 109, hemoglobin of 15.8 g/dl, and C-reactive protein (CRP) of 200 mg. Renal functions were normal, and liver function tests were normal except for an increased lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) level of 848 IU/l. His metformin was stopped because his gastrointestinal symptoms were attributed to metformin. After stopping metformin, he was able to eat normally and tolerate a regular diet. He received subcutaneous insulin therapy to control his glucose levels. He continued to have some abdominal discomfort, however, and on questioning reported right shoulder pain. Shoulder examination showed no signs of inflammation. There was no restriction of movement at the right shoulder. A chest X-ray appeared to demonstrate free air beneath the diaphragm. M.P. has pneumoperitoneum (PP). PP is the presence of air within the peritoneal cavity. Most commonly, it is caused by perforated viscous (perforated Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes

Signs Of Diabetes

Thats what reportedly happened to Rob Kardashian, the 28-year-old reality TV personality, this week. According to TMZ, he was rushed to an L.A. hospital and diagnosed with the condition. Rob had put on weight recently, but he no idea he had diabetes. And hes not alone: 25 percent of people with diabetes dont know theyre afflicted, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Paying attention to prediabetes warning signs could save you from an ER visit like Kardashiansand prevent you from ever developing full-blown diabetes. Here are the top silent alarms. (If these sound familiar, exercising and losing weight can reduce your risk. Try TheGet Back in Shape Workout: A 28-Day Program That Will Transform Your Body! ) 1. You know what the bathroom looks like at night. Because you visit often. As blood sugar levels go up, diabetes symptoms like frequent urination worsen. If 4 months ago you were getting up once in the middle of the night to pee and now youre getting up three times, thats a clue you need to get checked out, says Andrew Bremer, M.D., Ph.D., program director at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This may also be a symptom of prostate issues (such as an enlarged prostate). Either way, its best to bring the issue up with your doctor so he can rule out potential causes. You notice dark patches of skin on the back of your neck, but no matter how hard you rub, they wont come off. How come? Insulin resistance can cause a condition called acanthosis nigricans, which may appear during pre-diabetes. The dark, velvety patches can ring your neck and also appear on your elbows and knees. Once you get your glucose under control, the patches will likely fade away. Having high blood sugar levels in the long term damages the t Continue reading >>

7-year-olds Diagnosed With T2 Diabetes

7-year-olds Diagnosed With T2 Diabetes

Children as young as seven are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, which is usually associated with the middle-aged and elderly, because of increasingly unhealthy lifestyles, specialists warn today. Hundreds of children are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes every year - and the number is expected to rise.Photo: Getty Images Parents are to blame for driving their children to school, feeding them junk food and letting them lounge around for hours, they say. The experts warn that a tsunami of diabetes is engulfing the country, but millions are ignorant of the risks they face. Too many have hardly heard of the disease, or believe it is just a mild condition, according to a panel convened by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice) to provide new advice on preventing it. Type 2 diabetes, in which the body gradually loses its ability to produce insulin and tolerate high glucose levels, used to be called mature onset diabetes. But panel members said that label could no longer be used due to growing numbers of youngsters being diagnosed with it. Fat parents 'to blame for childhood obesity crisis' Christine Coltrell, a diabetes nurse specialist from Warwick, said: We are even getting children as young as seven with Type 2 diabetes, and that can have devastating long term health consequences. These children end up having heart attacks, or losing a limb, or their sight, in their 30s and 40s. All these children were seriously obese, she said, but the lifestyle problem which caused them were endemic. When we look at the way we are living our lives now, theres lots of fast and processed foods on offer, she said. People dont walk their children to school any longer, they drive them. Kamlesh Khunti, professor of primary care at Leicester University and a G Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes In Men

Signs Of Diabetes In Men

Have you had bouts of dizziness or unexplained irritability? Perhaps you’ve been feeling lethargic, with fatigue setting in by the middle of the day, even before hitting the gym? Maybe, you’re worried about your performance in bed? Believe it or not, all of these could be early signs of diabetes in men. Type 2 Diabetes is a disease characterized by the body’s inability to produce enough insulin. Sometimes, it could be the inability to use that insulin properly too. But, sometimes it could be a mix of both. If you’ve been feeling any of the above symptoms lately, chances are, your blood sugar levels are unstable. Research studies show that, biologically, men are more likely to get Type 2 diabetes, than women. But, this does not necessarily indicate that men are more vigilant about early symptoms. “A 40-year old man had been feeling tired for a whole year. It was only when he began to go to the washroom every hour that he finally came to see me. When we ran his labs, his HbA1c was at 22! A lot of internal damage must have occurred from blood sugar for years,” says Mahesh Jayaraman, Medical Researcher and Co-Founder of Sepalika. Here’s an important fact for you to chew on: Men, in general, tend to ignore early signs of T2D much more than women do. This is because of a tendency to bear it like a man. Often, symptoms of prediabetes are ignored as well. Prediabetes is a condition defined by slightly elevated blood sugar levels, that are not actually in the “dangerously high” range. Generally, men don’t get to the doctor before they have full-blown diabetes. Trust us when we say this – It’s not a good idea to ignore these symptoms of diabetes in men. Early detection and lifestyle changes make it so much easier and quicker to reverse prediabetes. General Continue reading >>

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

twitter summary: Ten tips for newly diagnosed T2 #diabetes: act NOW for long-term benefits, use healthy eating, exercise, meds + structured blood glucose testing short summary: This article offers ten tips for people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes: 1) Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing; 2) Start to take care of your diabetes as soon as you’re diagnosed (and even better, before, if you know you have prediabetes); 3) Recognize that type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease; 4) Keep in mind that food has a major impact on blood glucose; work to optimize your mealtime choices; 5) Exercise is a powerful and underutilized tool which can increase insulin sensitivity and improve health – use it as much as possible; 6) Use blood glucose testing to identify patterns; 7) Don’t forget that needing to take insulin doesn’t mean you failed; 8) Keep learning and find support; 9) Seek out the services of a Diabetes Educator; and 10) Review our Patient's Guide to Individualizing Therapy at www.diaTribe.org/patientguide. Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing. It develops through a combination of factors that are still being uncovered and better understood. Lifestyle (food, exercise, stress, sleep) certainly plays a major role, but genetics play a significant role as well. Type 2 diabetes is often described in the media as a result of being overweight, but the relationship is not that simple. Many overweight individuals never get type 2, and some people with type 2 were never overweight. At its core, type 2 involves two physiological issues: resistance to the insulin made by the person’s beta cells and too little insulin production relative to the amount one needs. These problems can lead to high bl Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Women: Young, Slim, And Diabetic

Type 2 Diabetes In Women: Young, Slim, And Diabetic

Stephanie Yi, 29, had a body most women would kill for. She never had to work hard to maintain her long-limbed, flat-bellied frame—weekend hikes near her northern California home and lots of spinach salads did the trick. She could easily afford to indulge her sweet tooth with the occasional buttery, sugary snack. At 5'7" and 120 pounds, she had, she figured, hit the good-genes jackpot. But everything changed two years ago, when a crippling fatigue left her sidelined from college classes. Listless, she dragged herself to a doctor, who suspected a thyroid imbalance. A blood test and a few days later, she received the alarming results: Her thyroid was fine; her blood sugar levels were not. She was prediabetic and on the cusp of developing type 2. Stephanie was stunned. Of course, she'd heard diabetes was a health crisis. (At last count, 26 million Americans had the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.) But weren't type 2 diabetics fat, sedentary, and on junk-food-and-soda diets? Stephanie hadn't been to a drive-through in ages; she didn't touch meat. Yet, somehow, she'd gotten an illness most slim women dodge. A Growing Threat The CDC estimates that one in nine adults has diabetes and, if current trends continue, one in three will be diabetic by the year 2050. For decades, typical type 2 patients were close to what Stephanie pictured: heavy and inactive. They were also older, often receiving a diagnosis in middle age or beyond. But while such type 2 cases continue to skyrocket, there has been a disturbing increase in a much younger set. The number of diabetes-related hospitalizations among people in their thirties has doubled in the past decade, with women 1.3 times more likely to be admitted than men. Perhaps even more troubling is the e Continue reading >>

Type 2 And Other Forms Of Diabetes In 0-30 Year Olds: A Hospital Based Study In Leeds, Uk.

Type 2 And Other Forms Of Diabetes In 0-30 Year Olds: A Hospital Based Study In Leeds, Uk.

Type 2 and other forms of diabetes in 0-30 year olds: a hospital based study in Leeds, UK. Feltbower RG, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2003. BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Following recent reports of increased numbers of adolescents being diagnosed with the adult or type 2 form of diabetes we aimed to describe the prevalence of both type 2 and other forms of diabetes in an urban population of children and young people in northern England. METHODS: A hospital based cross sectional study was performed in patients aged < or =30 years attending diabetic clinics in Leeds during the year 2000. RESULTS: A total of 677 subjects were identified, of whom 621 (92%) and 37 (5%) had type 1 and type 2 diabetes respectively. Four patients had confirmed maturity onset diabetes of the young, while the cause was uncertain for four. Median age of all patients was 22 years, with 396 (58%) aged 20-30; 32/37 patients with type 2 diabetes were aged 20-30. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 0.13 per 1000 overall, compared to 2.2 per 1000 for patients with type 1 diabetes. Of all type 2 diabetes patients, 24% were south Asian compared to 5% of the background population; 87% were categorised into the two least affluent tertiles of the Townsend score. This link with deprivation was not explained by the proportion of Asian patients across tertiles (approximately 25%). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows extremely low prevalence of type 2 diabetes in 10-19 year olds, but will provide a baseline for future comparisons. Overall, type 2 diabetes is seen more commonly in south Asians, and an association with deprivation is suggested. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is The Average Age Of Onset?

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is The Average Age Of Onset?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes. The variations between individual diagnoses are too great for there to be an exact age of onset for type 2 diabetes. There is evidence, however, that the likelihood of developing the condition increases drastically after the age of 45. Average age of onset for type 2 diabetes The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend annual diabetes screening tests after the age of 45. But the age at which someone develops the condition depends on too many differing factors to accurately predict. A wide mix of individual health and lifestyle factors can influence the progression of the condition. Many people have diabetes for years before being diagnosed, causing a large variation between the age of onset and age of diagnosis. Meanwhile, some estimates claim that nearly one-third of those with diabetes do not know they have it, which further complicates estimates. And many national surveys and studies do not distinguish between rates of type 1 and 2 diabetes in adults. According to the CDC, from 1997 through to 2011, the average age at which a person was diagnosed with diabetes in the United States was largely the same, at around 54 years of age. While there might not be a set age for onset for type 2 diabetes, age greatly increases the chances of developing the condition. In 2014, an estimated 4.3 percent of Americans over 20 years of age had diabetes, while 13.4 percent of those aged 45-64, and 11.2 percent of those aged 65 or older, had the condition. A 2016 study found that the rates of type 2 diabetes were up to seven times higher in Chinese adults, aged 55-74, than they were in those aged 20-34 years. The ADA report that rates of diabetes remain high i Continue reading >>

Could A 30-year-old Asthma Drug Lead To A New Treatment For Diabetes?

Could A 30-year-old Asthma Drug Lead To A New Treatment For Diabetes?

Could a 30-year-old asthma drug lead to a new treatment for diabetes? Targeting anti-inflammatory enzymes may lead to the development of new tools for treating diabetes. The anti-inflammatory drug amlexanox was invented in Japan in the 1980s to treat asthma but was quickly eclipsed by more effective treatments. Now a team of scientists led by the University of California at San Diego is looking at repurposing the drug in an entirely new setting: Type 2 diabetes. The UCSD team, working with scientists at the Salk Institute and the University of Michigan, discovered that two enzymes called IKK and TBK1 are ratcheted up in obese mice, making it difficult for them to burn calories and expend energy. So they screened 150,000 chemicals in search of something that would inhibit those two enzymes, according to a press release from UCSD. Thats when they stumbled upon amlexanox. Theyve now shown that some people with Type 2 diabetes experience a significant drop in glucose after taking the drug. The researchers tested amlexanox in 21 people with obesity and Type 2 diabetes, and compared them to a control group given a placebo. A third of people taking the drug responded to it, according to the release. Patients who had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease also responded well to it. Like this story? Subscribe to FierceBiotech! Biopharma is a fast-growing world where big ideas come along daily. Our subscribers rely on FierceBiotech as their must-read source for the latest news, analysis and data in the world of biotech and pharma R&D. Sign up today to get biotech news and updates delivered to your inbox and read on the go. The researchers wanted to understand what separated the responders from the non-responders, so they took biopsies of fat cells from the patients at the beginning an Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Incidence Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Adults Aged 30–49 Years

Incidence Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Adults Aged 30–49 Years

The population-based registry in the province of Turin, Italy Abstract OBJECTIVE—Incidence of type 1 diabetes is considered to be low in adults, but no study has been performed in Mediterranean countries. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We extended the study base of the registry of the province of Turin, Italy, to subjects aged 30–49 years in the period 1999–2001 to estimate the incidences of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was based on permanent insulin treatment or a fasting C-peptide level ≤0.20 nmol/l or islet cell (ICA) or GAD (GADA) antibody positivities. RESULTS—We identified 1,135 case subjects with high completeness of ascertainment (99%), giving an incidence rate of 58.0 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI 54.7–61.5). The incidence of type 1 diabetes was 7.3 per 100,000 person-years (6.2–8.6), comparable with the rates in subjects aged 0–14 and 15–29 years (10.3 [9.5–11.2] and 6.8 [6.3–7.4]). Male subjects had a higher risk than female subjects for both type 1 (rate ratio [RR] 1.70 [95% CI 1.21–2.38]) and type 2 (2.10 [1.84–2.40]) diabetes. ICA and/or GADA positivities were found in 16% of the cohort. In logistic regression, variables independently associated with autoimmune diabetes were age 30–39 years (odds ratio [OR] 2.39 [95% CI 1.40–4.07]), fasting C-peptide <0.60 nmol/l (3.09 [1.74–5.5]), and BMI <26 kg/m2 (2.17 [1.22–3.85]). CONCLUSIONS—Risk of type 1 diabetes between age 30 and 49 years is similar to that found in the same area between age 15 and 29 years. Further studies are required to allow geographical comparisons of risks of both childhood and adulthood autoimmune diabetes, the latter being probably higher than previously believed. Epidemiological studies (1–7) have provided evidence that Continue reading >>

Ask An Expert: Can A Young, Healthy, Active Adult Get Diabetes?

Ask An Expert: Can A Young, Healthy, Active Adult Get Diabetes?

Q: Can an active, 32-year-old Caucasian female who eats well and who does not suffer from obesity, high blood pressure or high cholesterol be diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes? If so, how common is this? Answer from Susanna Reiner, R.N., B.S.N., diabetes nurse educator, Providence Diabetes Education: Yes — even though a healthy diet, weight and lifestyle greatly reduce the chances of developing diabetes, there is still a small chance that the woman you described could be diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes due to risk factors beyond her control. It’s relatively uncommon, but it does happen. Fortunately, her healthy lifestyle will be an asset to her. If the woman in question is diagnosed with pre-diabetes, then staying physically active, maintaining a low-stress lifestyle and following a well-balanced diet will help her prevent or delay the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, according to the Diabetes Prevention Program. If she is diagnosed with diabetes, she’ll have a much better chance of preventing complications related to uncontrolled diabetes if she continues to follow her healthy habits. What could cause diabetes in such a young, otherwise healthy adult? Let’s first consider type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all cases of diabetes in the United States according to the National Diabetes Fact Sheet. Some of the most common risk factors for type 2 diabetes don’t appear to apply to the woman you’ve described. These include the following: Obesity, particularly around the waistline (associated with 90 percent of people who have type 2 diabetes, according to the World Health Organization) Certain non-Caucasian ethnic backgrounds (African-Americans, Native Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are a Continue reading >>

Diagnosis: Type 2 Diabetes. Age: 24.

Diagnosis: Type 2 Diabetes. Age: 24.

A few days after Christmas 2008, Mike Durbin of Fort Wayne, Ind., got an unwanted holiday surprise: a double diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and congestive heart failure. His blood glucose was well above normal, and his heart was functioning at only 30 to 35 percent of its capacity. “That scared the hell out of me,” he says. His diabetes diagnosis, however, was not a complete shock. His grandmother has type 2 diabetes, and his great-grandparents had the condition as well. He also had a number of risk factors, including excess weight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and triglycerides. Yet he had one advantage — his age. He was only 24. It might seem surprising that someone so young could develop type 2 diabetes, but the disease is on the rise among the under-30 set. In fact, 5.7 percent of all new cases of diabetes occur in people between 18 and 29, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates. Another 3.5 percent of diagnoses happen before patients’ 35th birthdays. In Durbin’s case, he was sent to the doctor with a diabetes symptom that just wouldn’t quit — a yeast infection. “As I’ve learned, yeast infections are common among people living with the various types of diabetes,” Durbin says. “The infection led me to the doctor. Tests were done, and I was diagnosed with type 2. Other tests done at that time revealed that I had congestive heart failure as well. In hindsight, I realized I had a lot of the typical symptoms also — increased thirst, dry mouth, frequent urination, fatigue, blurred vision, and headaches.” Creating a Diabetes Management Plan Durbin has made important lifestyle changes now that he’s living with type 2 diabetes. For starters, he checks his blood glucose at least four times a day: when he wakes up, befo Continue reading >>

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