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Diabetes Hunger Pangs

Hunger! - The Blood Sugar Diet By Michael Mosley

Hunger! - The Blood Sugar Diet By Michael Mosley

So Im pretty new to the BSD, Im marginally overweight, a vegetarian, but a mass exerciser. Im considering doing the BSD so having an introductory week to try a few things out before I decide whether to go full throttle! Ive been trying to do low carb, but Im hungry, like all the time. For breakfast I have an almond milk, protein powder, peanut butter and cacoa shake, and for lunch Ive had salad with dressing, feta, olives, butternut squash. I could eat a horse! Obviously its early days and new to me and so it takes time for my body to adjust, but lots of people talk about not being hungry at all!! I drink tonnes of water so thats not an issue! I am a sugar addict in whatever form it takes and I want to feel like I have more control over my carbs/sugar. Even if I decided to do the med style diet I think I would struggle! Slightly complicatedly I exercise a lot, I swim a mile about twice a week, cycle 16 miles a few times a week, sometimes do 90 mins of spinning or in the gym doing weights. Is it a sustainable diet when you do this much exercise, or do I just need to bear with this hunger knowing it should improve?! Thanks so much, the forum has been very educational. Im a GP and want to understand this lifestyle so I can recommend to my patients. Hi Kate, I cant answer your question about exercise, but can about hunger I was absolutely starving a lot of the time in the first 4 days or so, but rarely since then (am up to Week 6). In those early days I made sure I had healthy snacks on hand things like veggie soup which was low cal and filling, or Id have a small piece of cheese, spoonful of Greek yoghurt or say 5 almonds. Also drinking a cup of coffee with full cream milk mid morning kept me going till lunch. I rarely need to snack between meals now, although still have Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

How To Curb Hunger At Night With Type 2 Diabetes

How To Curb Hunger At Night With Type 2 Diabetes

Whenever I meet with patients for the first time, I always ask them to “take me through a typical day” describing the foods they eat and meal patterns they follow. Often I will hear something like this: “Well I’m not of a breakfast person…” “So is the first time you eat, lunch?” “…well sometimes I don’t eat lunch either.” “If you do eat lunch, what will it be?” “Oh a sandwich or something quick…maybe some chips.” “Ok, so how about dinner?” “A meat, a vegetable and a potato…or sometimes something quick like a pizza.” “Ok, do you snack after dinner?” “Well, see that’s my problem…” Touche. It certainly is a problem, especially when they go on to describe what the evening snacking routine consists of. I’ll give you a hint: it’s not celery and carrot sticks. So what is the deal with eating at night? How can we avoid nighttime eating? Or more importantly, nighttime overeating? I've got plenty of tips for you to consider. 3 Reasons NOT To Munch Out At Night First things first. Whatever you've heard about not eating after a certain time (I’ve heard 5 pm, 6 pm, 8 pm) because everything turns into fat, is just not supported by research. While it IS the case that, generally speaking, the body is more efficient at burning calories when it needs them (ie during the day), compared to when we're sedentary, the rule about a specific time of day is not substantiated by research. That said, I strongly discourage eating much in the evening for the following reasons: 1. Most people make relatively poor food choices in the evening. This is likely due to poor inhibition – we are less likely to make smart choices as our bodies and minds fatigue at the end of the day. Or it's often due to making up for insufficient food intake thr Continue reading >>

Why Does Polyphagia Occur In Diabetes?

Why Does Polyphagia Occur In Diabetes?

Did You Know? Frequent hunger sensations in diabetics have been attributed to the inability of glucose molecules to move into the body cells. Polyphagia refers to increased intake of food. This is one of the most common symptoms of diabetes in which a person develops uncontrollable food cravings, resulting in a dramatic increase in his/her appetite. Polyphagia patients often complain about frequent hunger pangs. The insatiable hunger linked to polyphagia, compels the person to gobble excessive amount of food during every meal. So, even after having a heavy meal at night, diabetic patients are likely to feel extremely hungry early in the morning. Polyphagia and Diabetes As aforementioned, polyphagia is commonly associated with diabetes, a condition that is typically marked by abnormally high blood glucose levels. Diabetic patients tend to eat more than normal. They feel hungry more often, and hence, they eat too much. In these following paragraphs, we will discuss why does polyphagia occur in diabetes. In healthy individuals, the food consumed is converted into glucose, which is then taken by the body cells to fulfill their energy needs. Glucose acts as a fuel for the body cells, allowing them to carry out their necessary functions. The insulin hormone secreted by the pancreas, ensures that the glucose is driven into the cells. In diabetes, the glucose does not enter the cells. This can be either due to insulin insufficiency or body cells not being receptive to actions of insulin. In any case, cell absorption of glucose does not take place. A small amount of glucose is always present in the bloodstream. However, as body cells are unable to absorb glucose, it leads to pooling of glucose in the bloodstream. So, despite high amount of glucose circulating in the bloodstream, Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Diet That Cured Me

Type 2 Diabetes And The Diet That Cured Me

Why me? At 59 I was 10st 7lb, 5ft 7in, and had never been overweight. I ran and played cricket regularly and didn't drink alcohol excessively. Yet at a routine check-up I was told that I had type 2 diabetes. In 10 years I could be dependent on insulin, it could affect my sight, feet, ears, heart and I had a 36% greater chance of dying early. In type 1 diabetes, the body produces none of the insulin that regulates our blood sugar levels. Very high glucose levels can damage the body's organs. Patients with type 2 diabetes, however, do produce insulin - just not enough to keep their glucose levels normal. Because I was fit and not overweight (obesity is a major risk factor in type 2 diabetes; however, a number of non-obese people, particularly members of south Asian communities, are also prone to it), my doctor told me I could control my condition with diet alone. Desperate for information, I headed to the web, where I found a report about a research trial at Newcastle University led by Professor Roy Taylor. His research suggested type 2 diabetes could be reversed by following a daily 800-calorie diet for eight weeks. When our bodies are deprived of normal amounts of food they consume their own fat reserves, with the fat inside organs used up first. The idea of Taylor's diet is to use up the fat that is clogging up the pancreas and preventing it from creating insulin, until normal glucose levels return. With my GP's blessing and a home glucose-testing kit, I began my experiment. The diet was strict: three litres of water a day, three 200-calorie food supplements (soups and shakes) and 200 calories of green vegetables. Thanks to my doctor's dietary guidance, and running three times a week, I had already lost a stone. Yet my glucose levels were still above 6mmol/L (millimols Continue reading >>

8 Hunger-suppressing Foods You Should Definitely Be Eating

8 Hunger-suppressing Foods You Should Definitely Be Eating

What if you could eat foods that would keep you from, well, eating more food? It's definitely possible. Each of the items on this list uniquely suppresses sensations of hunger. Work them into your meals and snacks and you'll find that you'll naturally eat less. Vinegar That oil and vinegar dressing on your salad may be helping your body control blood sugar—which can keep hunger in check. Researchers at the University of Milan found that red wine vinegar can cut the so-called glycemic response—the rise in blood sugar—from a high-carbohydrate meal by 30%. When blood sugar rises rapidly, it then plummets just as fast. Not only is this hard on your body, but the rapid drop signals to the brain that you need more food, fast. Researchers at Arizona State University repeated the study with similar results: When volunteers downed four teaspoons of apple cider vinegar before a high-carb breakfast of bagels and orange juice, their blood sugar response fell by 55%. And Japanese researchers found that when vinegar was included in a sauce during a meal, it could depress blood sugar and insulin response in men by 20 to 40%; it also slowed the accumulation of body fat. How does vinegar manage this magic trick? It contains acetic acid which seems to interfere with the breakdown of starches and slows the digestion of carbohydrates. You can use white, red wine, rice wine, apple cider, or balsamic vinegar with olive oil on your salad. And you can add it to sauces for fish, poultry, or beef. Popcorn Here's something most people forget about this movie-time snack: It's a whole grain. A serving of popcorn—about three cups—provides 70% of your daily whole grain needs, making it a surprisingly simple and almost indulgent source. All that fiber fills you up, keeping snacking urges at Continue reading >>

3 Ways To Ignore Hunger - Wikihow

3 Ways To Ignore Hunger - Wikihow

{"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/e\/ec\/Ignore-Hunger-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Ignore-Hunger-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/e\/ec\/Ignore-Hunger-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/v4-760px-Ignore-Hunger-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":760,"bigHeight":570,"licensing":"License: Creative Commons<\/a>\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} Understand the origin of a growling stomach. These sounds are usually caused by juices and gasses moving around the stomach and intestine. It's not your stomach telling you it's time to eat. The reason the sound is associated with hunger is that it's louder when the stomach and intestines are empty. If you have food in your stomach, it muffles the noise of this activity. [1] X Research source A growling stomach is not the same as hunger pangs, which start 12-24 hours after your last meal. Some people have more gas than others. Reasons that people have gas include poor nutrition, food intolerance, pregnancy, and genetics. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/5\/50\/Ignore-Hunger-Step-2-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Ignore-Hunger-Step-2-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/5\/50\/Ignore-Hunger-Step-2-Version-2.jpg\/v4-760px-Ignore-Hunger-Step-2-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":760,"bigHeight":570,"licensing":"License: Creative Commons<\/a>\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} Attribute hunger to your brain. Feelings of hunger might not be caused by an empty stomach. Hunger can occur for reasons of both physiological and psychological desire for satisfaction. Hunger pangs have been shown to continue even after a stomach has been removed. The hypothalamus, or brainstem, regulates feelings of hunger, not the st Continue reading >>

Sick To Your (empty) Stomach: Why Do I Feel Nauseous When I'm Hungry?

Sick To Your (empty) Stomach: Why Do I Feel Nauseous When I'm Hungry?

Feeling nauseous when hungry sounds strange, but it's apparently quite common. What could be making you nauseous on an empty stomach? A grumbling stomach and slight abdominal discomfort ("hunger pangs") are the most common first signs of hungry. Go without eating for a bit longer, and you may start feeling grumpy, shaky, and become unable to concentrate. What if you become nauseous when you're hungry, though? Is that quite normal? It's common enough, that's for sure — type "when I'm hungry I" into Google, and "feel nauseous" automatically emerges as a suggestion. While that statement is hardly worth as much as a scientific study probing into the percentages of people who feel sick to their stomach when they're hungry, the fact remains that Google doesn't offer those autofill suggestions if only two or three people a month use that search term. Hoping to find out more, I informally surveyed some of my friends. Sure enough, they, too, are familiar with the phenomenon. A friend with hypoglycemia told me that she experiences nausea when hungry, while another, who never had her blood sugar levels checked, feels nauseous while hungry too sometimes and attributes it to PMS. Yet another takes nausea while hungry as a sign that he's ingesting too many highly processed carbs and needs to lay off the junk food. They all, in other words, have their own theories about why they feel a bit queasy when they're hungry. Are they right? Let's investigate that! Could Your Nausea While Hungry Be A Sign Of Hypoglycemia? The most common symptoms of mild to moderate hypoglycemia — or blood glucose levels that are lower than they should be — are sweating, shakiness, heart palpitations, and slight anxiety, along with fatigue, headache, and blurred vision. Guess what two other symptoms char Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Causes Excessive Hunger?

Does Diabetes Causes Excessive Hunger?

Yes. Diabetes mellitus causes excessive hunger, called polyphagia. This hunger does not go away with eating though. In diabetes, due to lack of insulin in the body or due to its ineffective absorption by cells, glucose is not taken up by the cells and remains in the blood. (Insulin causes uptake of glucose into cells.) Hence, glucose is not being utilized for energy. The feeling of hunger is a feedback response by the body to prompt you to consume food, so that you acquire more glucose and use it for energy. However, because, insulin is not present, this glucose, nevertheless, is not taken up into the cells. Polyphagia, polytypsia, and polyurea can all be present in un-diagnosed diabetes. They also occur when a person with diabetes (PWD) is having blood sugar swings or consistently high blood sugars. Now I want to clarify something here about what these things FEEL like. Polyphagia - I live in the US and starvation due to lack of food access is very rare. But I can say that I was literally starving for about 6 months prior to being diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). And it was a hunger that hurt, ached, made me very irritable and sad. Getting food was my only thought - well that and sleeping because the huge amounts of food I was eating were not being converted in energy and therefore I was fatigued all the time. I would eat and eat and eat but without insulin, I lost weight. This hunger was dire. This is not a hunger from a one day fast or calorie restricted weight loss diet. This was 'my body is dying' hunger. I felt emotional panic thinking that I just could not get enough food. Polytypsia - You have never been this thirsty unless you have experienced it yourself. No amount of water or other beverage will quench your thirst. You drink and drink - rapidly, frequent Continue reading >>

Top Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Options

Top Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Options

Type 2 Diabetes Treatments Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors Type 2 Diabetes Medication Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes has become so prevalent that an estimated 9 percent of all adults over the age of 20 can now be classified as diabetic. When left untreated, this condition will impact almost every facet of an individual's health while reducing their overall quality of life. If you or a loved one has recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, then its time to start looking at your treatment options. Treatments for type 2 diabetes are more effective than ever, and many patients can completely reverse this condition with modern medication and changes to their lifestyle. One of the most important fuel sources for your body is glucose, and type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way your body absorbs and uses this form of energy. Depending on a number of different internal and external factors, you might be diagnosed with this disease if your body resists the effects of the hormone known as insulin or you cannot produce enough insulin to control your glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes was originally known as adult-onset diabetes because it generally did not occur in younger patients. Over the last few years, however, it has become much more prevalent among children and teenagers. It is also extremely common in adults over the age of 65 who tend to have relatively sedentary lives. Just as with many other chronic medical conditions, catching diabetes early could help you avoid the life-altering side effects of this disease. One of the most difficult aspects of type 2 diabetes is the fact that many people have it for years without ever realizing it. That is because the symptoms almost always develop slowly and can easily be confused with other medic Continue reading >>

Bob's Diabetes Story

Bob's Diabetes Story

First of all, I want to apologize to all my readers for taking a few days off. I own my own business and have been extremely busy trying to close some deals. Anyway - my apologies and hope to get back to the blogging on a regular basis. For those of you who reached out to see how I am doing - I truly appreciate your concerns. I do ask that you continue to pray for our friends in the Pacific Rim who have had major storms and many deaths along with the devastation. I also ask that you pray for the millions of Americans who have lost their health care coverage due to this new law. I do not dare what side of the political aisle you are on, people in this great nation not having health care coverage is simply ridiculous. Please pray that our leaders can get their heads out of the anus and make it all work! I can say all of that because this blog is about our bodies and bodily functions! As I mentioned I have been busy and the not eating has always been a problem of mine. So I will let you know what the last three days of readings have been and why this blasted disease is such a problem. Is that not crazy, and what causes this to happen? Well, as I have said many times - each of us are different and this disease impacts us in many different ways. I have truly never had a hunger pain in my life and my body does not tell me when it is hungry, like other people's do. So in the middle of all of this work stress, Kathy and I attended one of our bible study groups on Wednesday. Around 7:30 (after eating at noon and nothing else all day), my stomach started to growl and both of us were shocked. Neither of us has ever heard my stomach growl. So we talked about it coming home and laughed but also discussed it on a serious basis. So, like always, I thought instead of saying, "I have n Continue reading >>

This Condition Can Starve Your Pet, No Matter How Much She Eats

This Condition Can Starve Your Pet, No Matter How Much She Eats

If your cat is suddenly hungry all the time, it’s usually a sign of a larger problem and requires a visit to your veterinarian Disorders that can cause an increase in appetite include hyperthyroidism, diabetes mellitus, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, inflammatory bowel disease, and rarely, feline acromegaly Additional underlying causes for constant hunger include tumors, internal parasites, and certain medications By Dr. Becker Is your kitty companion a chowhound, constantly on the hunt for food, food, and more food? Excessive eating is called polyphagia, and an always-hungry cat may display one or more food-seeking behaviors, including: Gobbling up meals in one session Eating so fast he vomits immediately afterwards Accepting food he once refused to eat Pestering his human for more food or snacks Counter-surfing in search of food Begging or stealing food from any available source Constant Hunger Is Usually a Symptom of Another Problem If you're thinking to yourself, "MY fussy feline? Are you kidding?" you're not alone. The majority of people owned by a cat are more likely to worry about their pet's lack of appetite than constant hunger pangs. That's why if your cat does turn suddenly ravenous, you should make an appointment with your veterinarian. Actually, any change in your pet's normal conduct should be investigated, because when cats get sick, very often the first noticeable sign is a change in behavior. An excessively hungry kitty may have an underlying disease that's causing an increase in appetite. Feeding her more or simply ignoring her demands won't solve the problem. The sooner you find out or rule out potential causes for her hunger, the better equipped you'll be to provide her the help she needs. Diseases Known to Cause Excessive Hunger in Cats 1. Hyp Continue reading >>

30 Reasons Why You’re Always Hungry

30 Reasons Why You’re Always Hungry

While some people may double check to make sure they have their keys when they leave the house, you have to make sure you have a snack. And if you forget? Let's just hope no one is around to witness how hangry you get. You think you're eating enough, but no matter what you put in your body, you always seem to develop maddening cravings. So, what exactly is going on here? It turns out that hunger is a pretty complicated function and is influenced by both biological and psychological factors. (And there are also the devilish foods that make you hungrier, too!) We found some of the most common, scientifically-backed reasons why some of us are constantly ravenous. Read up so you can finally fill up and feel satisfied! Even if you're eating something at every meal, if your day looks something like this—a cup of sugary, flaked cereal for breakfast, a slice of pizza or a sandwich on white bread for lunch, chips for a snack, either white rice or pasta for dinner, and then a chocolate chip cookie for dessert—your problem is that you're constantly fueling yourself with nutritionally-deficient refined carbs. Lacking the satiating fiber of their original form, simple and refined carbs burn up quickly in your body, which spikes your blood sugar and then causes it to crash. Low glucose levels are what triggers your hunger hormones, leaving you with a craving for more carbs! Eat This! Tip: For slow-burning, clean sources of energy, choose complex carbs such as grains like brown rice, quinoa and triticale, cruciferous vegetables, fruits, and whole-grain sprouted bread. Sprouting grains is one of the ways to get more nutrients out of your food. Did seeing that picture of water just make you forget about what you thought was a hungry tummy? A study in the journal Physiology & Behavio Continue reading >>

After Eating Why Do I Have Severe Hunger Pains?

After Eating Why Do I Have Severe Hunger Pains?

If you have severe hunger pains after eating, it may be a sign that something is not quite right. While certain medical conditions such as ulcers and uncontrolled diabetes can cause you to feel this way, sometimes the hunger is caused by irregular eating habits, drugs or other medical conditions. While improving eating habits may help control appetite better, it's important to see your doctor if this hunger is severe and persistent. Video of the Day A peptic ulcer is a crater or sore in the lining of the stomach, most often caused by either a bacterial infection called Helicobacter pylori or by excessive use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen. One of the most telling signs of a peptic ulcer is a constant, gnawing hunger, which often occurs 1 to 3 hours after eating. This hunger may be accompanied by a burning pain in between your belly and breastbone. The good news is that once diagnosed, medication management is often successful. High blood sugars can also cause severe hunger or polyphagia. Most common when blood sugars are above 200 mg/dL, polyphagia -- along with frequent urination and extreme thirst -- is a classic symptom of insulin deficiency and uncontrolled diabetes. High blood sugars occur when the body doesn’t make enough insulin or if insulin doesn’t work well in the body, and without necessary treatment, much of the glucose or sugar from food isn’t able to be utilized. This starves body cells of energy, signaling the brain to increase hunger. Hunger can also be associated with hypoglycemia or low blood sugar levels, so if you have diabetes, it’s a good idea to check your blood sugar whenever you have severe hunger. Sometimes irregular eating habits or restricted eating can lead to hunger, although it may not b Continue reading >>

13 Hidden Signs You Could Have Type-2 Diabetes

13 Hidden Signs You Could Have Type-2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. While most people with type-1 diabetes are born with it, type-2 can come on at any time. With type-2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body’s cells don't react to insulin. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. If diabetes is left untreated the glucose starts to build up in the blood instead of heading straight for the cells. If the blood sugar gets too high or too low, health complications arise. Here are 13 signs that you might have type-2 diabetes: 1. EXCESSIVE THRIST Feeling constantly thirsty is one of the most common symptoms of diabetes. It's usually coupled with dryness in the mouth and can be one of the first signs to develop. 2. HUNGER A sudden increase in appetite, particularly sweet cravings, can also be a symptom of the condition. This is because of the really high or really low blood sugar levels. When your blood sugar levels dip, this sends the signal to the body that you need to eat something, which explains hunger pangs at any time of the day. 3. WEIGHT LOSS If you are eating more but seem to be losing weight this could be an indication that something isn't right. Because your body lacks insulin or it’s becoming insulin-sensitive, it can't transport blood sugar into the muscle cells. As a result, your blood sugar level becomes alarmingly high and all the excess sugar goes into your urine. Hence, the weight loss. 4. FREQUENT TOILET BREAKS If you seem to need to pee constantly, this could by a symptom too. Frequent urination is one of the major symptoms of both type-1 and type-2 diabetes. When there are abnormally high blood sugar levels, some of the ex Continue reading >>

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