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Diabetes Hunger At Night

Do You Bolt Awake At 3 A.m.? Low Blood Sugar Symptoms May Be To Blame

Do You Bolt Awake At 3 A.m.? Low Blood Sugar Symptoms May Be To Blame

You’re exhausted and you need your eight hours of sleep, but you suddenly bolt awake around 3 or 4 a.m., energy coursing through your veins and mind churning anxiously. What gives? Waking up in the middle of the night is simply one of many low blood sugar symptoms. Why Symptoms of Low Blood Sugar Can Cause You to Be Awake at 3 a.m. Sleeping through the night represents a long period without food when blood sugar can drop too low. This is bad news for the brain, which depends on glucose for energy. The brain is highly active at night, transforming short-term memory into long-term memory,[1] and carrying out repair and regeneration.[2] In response, the adrenal glands, two walnut-shaped glands that sit atop the kidneys, release stress hormones. These stress hormones raise blood sugar back to a safe level. Unfortunately, stress hormones also raise, well, stress. Hence the anxious awakening during night’s darkest hours. Eating at 3 a.m. Can Help You Fall Back to Sleep A quick fix for this and other low blood sugar symptoms (below) can be as simple as eating a small amount of protein—with perhaps some fat thrown in—when you wake up too early. This could a spoonful of nut butter, a few pieces of meat, or a hard-boiled egg. Some find this stabilizes blood sugar levels enough so they fall back asleep. Do not, however, eat something starchy at this time, such as bread or cereal, as it will spike blood sugar levels, causing them to drop too low again. Daytime Tips to Avoid Waking Up at 3 a.m. Every Night Although a quick snack may help you fall back asleep, it’s better to prevent waking up in the first place. If you are waking up regularly at 3 a.m., chances are you suffer from low blood sugar symptoms. Signs of low blood sugar include: Sugar cravings Irritability, light Continue reading >>

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Are late-night snacks a no-no for people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes, late-night snacks aren't necessarily off-limits — but it's important to make wise choices. Late-night snacks add extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. And if you snack after your evening meal — especially if the foods contain carbohydrates — you may wake up the next morning with a high blood sugar level. If you're hungry after dinner, choose a "free" food, such as: One sugar-free frozen cream pop Five baby carrots One cup of light popcorn A small handful of goldfish-style crackers A can of diet soda Or swap the snack for a piece of gum or small hard candy. These "free" foods have few, if any, carbohydrates and calories, so they won't contribute to weight gain or increased blood sugar. If you take insulin or other diabetes medications and feel that you must snack before bedtime to prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend adjusting the dose of your medications to prevent the need for a late-night snack. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

No Snacking In The Middle Of The Night

No Snacking In The Middle Of The Night

so my fasting numbers have been high lately (been on this "diet" for 2 weeks now) so after reading many womens' evening snacking theories related to fasting, I tried a piece of laughing cow cheese at 3 am...bad idea! woke up 3 hours later to 119! ugh, kinda grateful I won't have to do that on a permanent basis lol but anyone else have trouble w/fasting numbers ? my doctor isn't concerned just yet and I do NOT want to go on meds/insulin as I am fully able to control my day and nighttime numbers...thanks in advance ! Before I went on insulin, my doctor suggested I try a spoonful of peanut butter and see if that works. Some people do better with just protein, others with just carbs. I tried it all, and had to do insulin anyway. :( :( :( I think its relatively common, based on this board, haha! My fasting bs was my problem. I have, however, managed to control it. I experimented with different night time snacks. For me the secret seems to be in eating 1/2 C of plain Greek yogurt with 1/4 C or so of berries. Lately I've also been having a whole wheat English muffin with butter and have been waking up with great bs readings. I would say it probably took about 2-3 weeks before I got the numbers under control.... This obviously isnt the case for everyone, but it can be for some. I didn't eat anything for 11 hours from last night to this morning and my fasting number was 90, is that good or bad? I have no clue! Who knows if they do, haha! I just like them because I get more bang for my buck--You can have a whole bunch to add up to just one serving... And I need a little something to sweeten plain yogurt! Good luck! Peanut butter filled pretzels and string cheese brought my numbers down. The protein/carb mix made it happen. Peanut butter filled pretzels and string cheese brought Continue reading >>

Night Time Hunger

Night Time Hunger

I was just wondering how many of you have times during the night when you have to get up because you are starving. This has happened to me two or three times since I was diagnosed. Last night being the latest time. Three in the morning I woke up feeling nauseated and starving. I ate a pear and tried to go back to bed. It took me about half an hour to stop feeling so sick to my stomach. This morning I don't feel the greatest. I am tired, and just feel out of sorts. What do you all do when you have times like that? Is there a certain reason it happens? We had a nice chicken dinner at 7pm, so I am not sure why I would have been so hungry at 3am. My sugar this morning was 99, so would the problem be that my sugar went too low during the night? "The lean meat nightmare of a type 2 newbie" When a type 2 newbie eats too much lean meat at the evening meal an unpleasant thing happens. His body will digest and store the meal but the excess protein will be broken down at a later time. As this protein is converted to glucose the body will release more insulin to stabilize it's blood sugar. This insulin will also remove the fat from the blood and this will make one very hungry. When the fat has been removed from the blood the same amount of insulin will now be about twice as effective at removing any sugar in the blood which may now cause low blood sugar along with low blood fat. This can be very unpleasant in the middle of the night. The only remedy is to not eat a lot of meat at the evening meal. Remember to take this with a grain of salt! Type 2 (very advanced Metabolic Syndrome ) for about 15 years but "insulin/oxygen resistant" for about 40 years Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hunger And Food Cravings

Diabetes Hunger And Food Cravings

Surveys find that nearly 100% of young women and almost 70% of young men sometimes have food cravings. For most people, cravings at worst add a little weight. With diabetes, they can be a serious problem. Food cravings might cause you to eat way too much of things that spike your sugars. What are food cravings, though? Where do they come from, and how can we deal with them in a healthy way? Let’s divide cravings into two types: physical hunger and emotional distress. It’s normal to feel strong hunger if blood sugar is low, or if your stomach is too empty. Then you really need to eat. If your sugar is low, you might need some carbs; if you just feel empty, some high-fiber vegetables or water might be preferable. Diabetes can cause hunger if glucose is not getting into the cells where it’s needed. Other medical causes of excess hunger include thyroid problems (such as Graves’ disease,) pregnancy, cannabis smoking, and depression. To avoid the cravings of low sugar or empty stomach, remember to eat regularly, especially breakfast. Breakfast with protein should keep cravings away at least until the afternoon. Eating may not stop some people’s low-sugar hunger. If that happens to you, you may need insulin, an insulin-sensitizing medication, or an herb such as bitter melon to get glucose into your cells. Food cravings are not always physical, though. In addition to body hunger and stomach hunger, there is what psychologist William Polonsky, PhD, CDE, calls mouth hunger or eyeball hunger. “While your stomach may be satisfied,” says Dr. Polonsky, “your eyeballs, mouth, and brain may still feel famished. If your meal plan is too limiting [in terms of food types], you may be depriving yourself of the joy of eating and the sense of satisfaction your mind and body c Continue reading >>

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Is hunger a sign of diabetes? If you don’t have diabetes, could hunger be one of the signs of diabetes? Is being hungry all of the time (polyphagia) a sign that you should go get checked for diabetes? After all, polyphagia is one of the “3 Poly’s,” is part of a triad of symptoms indicating diabetes. In addition to polyphagia, or increased hunger, the symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia are also signs of diabetes. Susan’s story Susan was constantly hunger. She never seemed to feel satisfied as she snacked off and on all day long from increasing hunger pangs. Susan’s hunger had gotten progressively worse over the past year. She noticed that she had been going to the bathroom more frequently, and wasn’t sure if she might be getting a urinary tract infection. Oddly enough, she hadn’t gained any weight. She had even lost a few pounds. She visited her primary care provider, and relayed her symptoms to the nurse. The doctor recommended that Susan be checked for several different conditions, but the one that stuck out in Susan’s mind was diabetes. She had an aunt with diabetes. She remembered how sick she got, and how she’d spend her days in the dialysis unit. Susan didn’t want diabetes, at least the kind that she knew about from her aunt. When Susan contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she was concerned that she did indeed have diabetes. She was waiting for her test results, but she was eager to find out if hunger was a sure sign that she has diabetes? I suggest reading the following articles: We decided to look into it for Susan. Let’s see what we found. Polyphagia: What is it? With polyphagia, even after having just eaten, you will feel hunger, or find that you have cravings for particular foods that monopolize your thoughts. The definition of polyphagia, wh Continue reading >>

What Causes Midnight Hunger?

What Causes Midnight Hunger?

People experience hunger when blood sugar levels drop below normal. What you eat throughout the day effects blood sugar not only during the day, but also into the night, so eating habits play a large role. While the body is at rest, energy needs drop. The liver produces less glucose -- the sugar in blood which provides energy -- and to maintain balance with the liver for the pancreas to pump out less insulin. However; a number of factors may interfere with this balance of energy. Giving in to late night hunger cravings on a regular basis may result in weight gain, interrupted metabolism or improper digestion. Imbalanced Blood Sugar Levels Blood sugar levels should not rise and fall rapidly, but should stay stable as much as possible. Simple carbohydrates, such as white flour and sugar, found in most processed “snack” foods, are converted rapidly to sugar, causing an unhealthy spike in blood sugar. The body then quickly produces insulin to try and process the sugar, resulting in a drastic drop. When your blood glucose is low, you may feel shaky, irritable, light-headed, dizzy, anxious with a rapid heart beat, confused or extremely hungry. You might also feel restless or sweaty, and have headaches or bad dreams. Exercising more than usual during the day can also cause low blood glucose at night. Irregular Meal Patterns Eat at regular intervals around the same time each day. Keeping blood sugar steady throughout the day helps prevent the late-night appetite. Start the day with a healthy and satisfying breakfast, and don’t be afraid to have a healthy snack between meals to prevent blood sugar from getting too low. Enjoy a moderately-sized dinner and consider a light snack about two hours before bed if you feel the need. The snack should include a healthy carbohydrate Continue reading >>

The Best Midnight Snacks For Diabetes Management

The Best Midnight Snacks For Diabetes Management

1 / 7 Midnight Snacking Isn't Off Limits If You Have Diabetes Midnight snacking doesn’t typically have the healthiest connotations. But being hungry late at night doesn’t mean you have to derail your diabetes diet by standing in front of the refrigerator spooning ice cream out of the tub, as delicious as that may sound. In fact, satisfying a late-night craving with a healthy snack may be good for diabetes. That’s because fasting for too long can, in some cases, make the liver overproduce glucose, which can raise blood sugar — an effect that can be harmful for people with type 2 diabetes, says Lori Chong, RDN, CDE, at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus. Next time you have a hankering for something salty, savory, or sweet, get your hands on one of these diabetes-friendly snacks to ward off hunger and help you get back to sleep. Continue reading >>

Hungry And Thirsty Through The Night

Hungry And Thirsty Through The Night

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hello all, lately these past few weeks I've been up throughout the night a few times and everytime I feel as if I'm about to throw up if I don't eat or drink something quickly. I normally have a few crackers with cream cheese or sliced and a glass of squash and it helped at first, but now I can't stomach cheese and I can't test my bloods at night as I am only allowed by my DSN to test before and after breakfast, lunch and dinner. I'd be inclined to ignore the DSN and check your blood when this is happening - you need to understand whether it is related to your sugar levels or not, so you can act accordingly. Just woke up, feeling sick and hungry. Tested my blood sugar levels and it's 24.7. Hello, you need to let someone where you live know how you are feeling at night. I am sure once your DSN knows how you are they will help sort this for you. Just woke up, feeling sick and hungry. Tested my blood sugar levels and it's 24.7. Would advise you to contact your DSN/GP straight away with levels that high. Please let us know how you get on. Would advise you to contact your DSN/GP straight away with levels that high. Please let us know how you get on. Left voicemails for both of them. Injected 24 units of Novorapid, 1.2 units of Victoza and just had 3 weetabix with milk, sprinkled with Splenda. DavidGrahamJones Type 2 Well-Known Member I am only allowed by my DSN to test before and after breakfast, lunch and dinner. You've obviously done the right thing by measuring at a time ot Continue reading >>

Food To Eat At Night For Diabetics

Food To Eat At Night For Diabetics

Diabetics should understand the nutritional values of food, especially for nighttime meals and snacks, in order to come up with a strategy to keep blood glucose levels under control. Proper spacing of meals and snacks throughout the day provides a more gradual amount of glucose to your body. A meal plan helps with this by letting you figure out when and how much to eat and what time to eat to keep the blood glucose in your target range. Video of the Day According to the Mayo Clinic, late-night eating is fine for diabetics, but you have to make the right choices at night because snacks have extra calories, which can cause weight gain. Also, an after-dinner snack containing carbohydrates may increase your glucose levels overnight. The Mayo Clinic recommends eating a "free" food as a late-night snack, such as a diet drink, sugar-free gelatin, carrots, saltine crackers or a vanilla wafer. Free foods have few or no calories or carbohydrates. Also acceptable is chewing gum or a piece of hard candy. Taste of Home magazine recommends raw vegetables such as bell pepper strips, cauliflower or broccoli florets, celery, carrots, cucumbers, radishes or even zucchini as a light snack, because these foods have few carbohydrates, which helps you keep blood glucose levels under control. If you don't have fresh raw vegetables on hand, the magazine suggests other snack options, such as a granola bar, six saltine crackers, eight plain animal crackers, a box of raisins, a small bag of reduced-fat potato chips, three gingersnap cookies or five vanilla wafers. Going out to eat at dinnertime can be a challenge for diabetics because what you eat and when you eat it can have an effect on your blood glucose levels. In a restaurant, you have little control over the timing of food delivery. You nee Continue reading >>

Hungry In The Middle Of The Night

Hungry In The Middle Of The Night

Just found this website. Awake at 4 a.m. with hunger pains. Hesitated to eat, because I didn't want a high reading in the a.m. I often wake up hungry. I've found, though, that true hunger pains usually means low levels. When I sleep through the hunger, I wake up with a higher reading. Thought I'd research the dawn phenomenon...and happened upon this site...where I also learned about the Somogyi effect (which I'd never heard of). Good information here. I think I'll try the 2:00-3:00 a.m. testing to see what is going on after reading this. Sounds like I need a better snack before bedtime maybe. Thanks! Friend T1 since 2000, on pump, good for info!!! eat carrots. thats what i do. assuming im not low. lol When life gives you lemons, throw them at someone!!! Moderator T2 since Oct 08, from insulin to no meds =) Sometimes i find myself really really hungry (to the point of having gastric pain)...my levels are actually low... if not...then i'm just hungry and not eaten enough Do keep us posted on your quest to find your answer...and good luck!! let us know if you have any other questions HbA1c: Oct 08 - 9.2% | Dec 08 - 5.5% | Feb 09 - 4.4% | June,Sep,Dec 09,Mar 10 - 5.2% | June, Aug 10 - 5% | Nov 10 - 5.3% | Dec 10 - 5.1% | Feb 11 - 5.2% | May 11 - 5.3% | Aug 11 - 4.6% | Dec 11 - 5% | March 12 - 5.1% | June 12 - 5.0% | Sept 12 - 4.9% | Dec 12 - 5.2% | March 13 - 4.8% | May 13 - 5.0% | Oct, Dec 13 - 5.2% | Mar 14 - 5.0% Continue reading >>

What It Means When Hunger Strikes At Night

What It Means When Hunger Strikes At Night

What It Means When Hunger Strikes at Night Health , Diseases & Conditions , Diabetes I often wake up very hungry in the middle of the night. What is going on? You appear to be having blood sugar dips. You may get some relief by eating a small amount of protein at bedtime (cheese or an egg) with some carbohydrate (a whole-grain cracker)or some celery with nut butter. If you still wake up during the night, try having more of the same foods. Waking up because you feel hungry suggests that you may have hypoglycemia, low blood sugar that can be triggered by eating simple carbs, such as white bread or cookies, which are quickly digested. To ease blood sugar fluctuations, consume slowly absorbed, unrefined carbs (such as whole grains, beans and starchy veggies), protein at each meal and a little fat (for example, fatty fish, olive oil and avocado). Eat several small meals a day, beginning with breakfast. Avoid alcohol, caffeine and tobacco, especially before bedtime. A chromium supplement200 micrograms (mcg) twice dailywill also help balance your blood sugar levels. Another issue here could be high cortisol during the night, caused by stress. Wind down from the day by taking a warm bath and/or drinking a cup of chamomile tea. If you still have trouble staying asleep, I recommend a natural sleep formula that contains L-theanine, valerian and other sleep-promoting herbs. Be sure to check first with your doctor before taking chromium or herbsthese supplements can interact with some medications. Source: Hyla Cass, MD, an integrative physician in private practice in southern California. She is also the author of 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health . Date: May 1, 2015 Publication: Bottom Line Health For over four decades, weve brought you the best in wellness and wealth advice from our famil Continue reading >>

Polyphagia - Increased Appetite

Polyphagia - Increased Appetite

Tweet Polyphagia is the medical term used to describe excessive hunger or increased appetite and is one of the 3 main signs of diabetes. An increase in hunger is usually a response to normal things such as intensive exercise or other strenuous activity, but polyphagia can also be the result of more severe issues such as depression or stress. Also known as hyperphagia, it is one of the three main symptoms of diabetes, along with: Polydipsia (increased thirst) and Polyuria (frequent, excessive urination) Causes of polyphagia Polyphagia can be caused by: Diabetes mellitus Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels) Anxiety Stress Bulimia Binge eating disorder Hyperthyroidism (raised level of thyroid hormone) Premenstrual syndrome Certain prescription drugs such as corticosteroids Some psychiatric conditions Rare medical conditions such as Kleine-Levin Syndrome and Prader-Willi Syndrome Hunger and hyperglycemia In uncontrolled diabetes where blood glucose levels remain abnormally high (hyperglycemia), glucose from the blood cannot enter the cells - due to either a lack of insulin or insulin resistance - so the body can’t convert the food you eat into energy. This lack of energy causes an increase in hunger. Simply eating will not get rid of the hungry feeling of polyphagia in people with uncontrolled diabetes, as this will just add to the already high blood glucose levels. The best way to lower blood glucose levels is to exercise as this can help to stimulate insulin production and reduce blood sugar levels. However, if the hunger persists, you may need to consult your doctor or diabetes health care team. Hunger and hypoglycemia Increased appetite can also be caused by abnormally low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). If blood glucose readings Continue reading >>

Late Night Hunger What Should I Do And What Shou... | Diabetic Connect

Late Night Hunger What Should I Do And What Shou... | Diabetic Connect

Im starting to use low cal low fat breakfast bars. They do the trick most of the time lastly and don't interfere with my morning sugars. Sometimes a toast and pb but i worry about sugars in am. I think its gonna be a matter of me just trying to find something until it works for me. I really appreciate everything people are adding for suggestions and tips. I take them all in and see if they would apply to myself and what i can do with them. Again thanks all! I have noticed that my intense hunger cravings have severely been diminished as well as my "ravenous" appetite since getting my sugars under control the past 6 months. Now a typical snack at night for me is some ice cream, white cheddar popcorn, or maybe some cheddar cheese and triscuits. Nuts do a good job too and all don't jack my sugar up. Jaybee do you mean my blood sugars. Usually they are down a little bit when i am really hungry like that. I get those some times, but I try to drink water or something if I have already eaten my evening snack. Sometimes it is a reminder that I didn't eat one, but I don't like to eat right before I go to sleep. A lot of folks have recommended a hand full of peanuts or something that will be a slow break down through the night. One member eats a whole wheat mini bagel before bed and another one has 6 plain m&m's. The trick is to find something that works for you and doesn't mess with your morning numbers too badly. Don't eat a lot and try to just keep it a few bites to satisfy the craving without eating too much. Continue reading >>

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