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Diabetes Heartburn Treatment

Reflux: A Fiery Friend Of Diabetes

Reflux: A Fiery Friend Of Diabetes

According to JNM, you're probably in the minority if you don't. Research has uncovered that between 25 to 75 percent of people living with diabetes also have Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). What is GERD? Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease is a condition that manifests itself by the following symptoms: heartburn, belching, a sour taste in the mouth or a chronic dry cough. Some of those afflicted are totally unaware that they have it. GERD essentially means that stomach acid and bile are going back up the esophagus irritating its tender and protective lining. According to Diabetes Self Management, this condition can cause: erosion of the esophagus, chronic inflammation (esophagitis), difficulty swallowing and a higher risk of esophageal cancer. This condition is certainly more common in those that are overweight, but regardless of weight — more people with diabetes have it. What's the connection? There's actually no real causative studies that link diabetes to GERD, but according to Joslin Diabetes Center: "it’s often one of the many ailments that people with type 2 diabetes put up with." Studies show that a higher percentage of people who have not only diabetes, but also have neuropathy and gastroparesis will also have GERD. Chronic inflammation of the esophagus unfortunately can affect how easy it is to control diabetes, yet another reason a timely diagnosis of GERD is warranted. Heartburn vs. Heart Attack Commonly confused for a heart attack (when someone appears in the ER with other risk factors: obesity, hypertension, diabetes or hyperlipidemia) they may find themselves getting 'the million dollar workup' and go home with a simple stomach acid inhibitor. On the flip side, if your medication isn't taking care of your heartburn, don't be shy — request a card Continue reading >>

Heartburn (acid Reflux) And Indigestion In Pregnancy

Heartburn (acid Reflux) And Indigestion In Pregnancy

Unfortunately heartburn and indigestion are a common problem during pregnancy but what things are suitable to take during pregnancy which won't effect your blood sugar levels? Gaviscon and Sugar Free Rennies. If these do not work then your GP may prescribe Ranitidine or Omeprazole. All these products are suitable for use during pregnancy with gestational diabetes. Off the shelf products for heartburn and indigestion Gaviscon contains no sugar and will not raise blood sugar levels Rennies can be used, but be careful to select the sugar free version Get Free Email Updates! Signup now and receive an email once I publish new content. I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are common among all people, including those affected by diabetes. At some point in any patient's life, the chances that he or she will develop a GI tract problem, be it peptic ulcer disease, gallstones, irritable bowel syndrome, food poisoning, or some other malady, are extremely high. As many as 75% of patients visiting diabetes clinics will report significant GI symptoms. The entire GI tract can be affected by diabetes from the oral cavity and esophagus to the large bowel and anorectal region. Thus, the symptom complex that may be experienced can vary widely. Common complaints may include dysphagia, early satiety, reflux, constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Many patients go undiagnosed and under-treated because the GI tract has not been traditionally associated with diabetes and its complications. Both acute and chronic hyperglycemia can lead to specific GI complications. Diabetes is a systemic disease that may affect many organ systems, and the GI tract is no exception. As with other complications of diabetes, the duration of the disorder and poor glycemic control seem to be associated with more severe GI problems. Patients with a history of retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy should be presumed to have GI abnormalities until proven otherwise, and this is best determined by asking a few simple questions. (See "Patient Information".) Many GI complications of diabetes seem to be related to dysfunction of the neurons supplying the enteric nervous system. Just as the nerves in the feet may be affected in peripheral neuropathy, involvement of the intestinal nerves may lead to enteric neuropathy. This is a type of autonomic or "involuntary" neuropathy and may lead to abnormalities in intestinal motility, sensat Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Acid Reflux

Diabetes And Acid Reflux

If you have diabetes and acid reflux, also called GERD, and you take medication to reduce acid there are some things you should know. There are health risks to taking GERD medications long term There is a good possibility you could control GERD with the right food and nutrition changes Did you know acid reflux medications could cause the following problems? Magnesium Deficiency There is also a strong association between low magnesium and insulin resistance, the main problem of type 2 diabetes. The FDA earlier this year released information about how taking these medications for longer than a year can cause low magnesium, which can lead to leg spasms, heart arrhythmias and seizures. Pneumonia If you have diabetes and get pneumonia it may be more severe with greater risk of complications, and your body may take longer to heal. C-diff Short for Clostridium Difficile, this is bacteria that cause severe diarrhea and inflammation in the colon. Dehydration is the biggest risk with diarrhea and diabetes, and if you have high blood sugars you can become dehydrated much quicker. Osteoporosis or Bone Fractures People with diabetes are may also have low vitamin D levels or be taking Actos, both of which may increase the risk of bone fractures. Vitamin Deficiencies such as B12 People with diabetes who take metformin are also at risk for low B12 levels. Bacterial Imbalance leading to Digestive Problems People who have had diabetes for many years can have slow digestion due to nerve damage. Keeping a healthy balance of intestinal bacteria is important for immune system, absorbing nutrients and avoiding diarrhea and constipation. What you can do if you have to take medication for acid reflux. Eat healthy foods and whole foods for immune strength. Nuts are the best food source for magne Continue reading >>

Heartburn, Diabetes Patients Be Aware…

Heartburn, Diabetes Patients Be Aware…

An overview Heartburn is suffered by many Americans. Over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription heartburn medicines are taking a big chunk of pharmacy shelving spaces. Stress, overeating, smoking, consuming caffeine and eating acidic foods and others are the causes. Gastritis is often confused with heartburn which is an inflammation of the stomach caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) like ibuprofen, and naproxen and alcohol and bacteria Helicobactor Pylori. Why heartburn does not happen to everybody In healthy individuals, foods are passed down to the esophagus and to the stomach and moved into the small intestine seamlessly. This is possible because the proper function of lower esophageal “velve” medically called lower esophageal sphincter (LES) which prevents the stomach acid and the digested foods from entering back into esophagus (reflux). Reflux causes pain and damage to the tissue (esophagus lining is not acid-proof whereas the stomach has protective lining against acid). This improper reflux process is called gastroesophageal reflux and the disease is called gastroesophageal reflux disease GERD). Heartburn effects the older population and males more than females. Individuals who are obese, diabetic and nicotine dependent are more susceptible. Reflux during sleep could cause death and prolonged reflux could lead to cancer in the throat. Thus, heartburn should be taken seriously and this includes prevention and proper treatments. Prevention of heartburn and treatment options and cautions Prevention of heartburn starts with what we eat. Some pain medicines, caffeine, and blood pressure may cause LES to function slower. Most acid caused reflux can be reduced by simply eating less acidic or spicy foods. This may include aspirin, vitamin C supplemen Continue reading >>

9 Serious Conditions That Mimic Heartburn

9 Serious Conditions That Mimic Heartburn

Heartburn-like pain is a common symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). But several other conditions can cause a burning feeling in your chest. Most of the time, your doctor will be able to identify whether you have heartburn or GERD by doing tests. Here are nine other conditions that can cause heartburn-like pain. 1. Angina Angina, or chest pain caused by lack of blood flow to the heart, can feel a lot like heartburn. "The major key is if you're getting heartburn when you're doing strenuous or moderate activity," says Dr. Ryan Madanick, a gastroenterologist and assistant professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, in Chapel Hill. If you're 50 or older and getting heartburn—especially if you haven't had this kind of pain before—it can raise suspicion of angina. Suspicions can also be raised if you're younger but have heart risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, or a family history of heart disease. 2. Gallstones Although gallstones don't always cause symptoms, a stone blocking your bile duct can hurt, usually in the middle or upper-right side of the abdomen. Pain may be cramping, dull, or sharp, and often strikes minutes after you eat. If you're experiencing stomach pain after meals that doesn't improve after you take an over-the-counter acid-suppressing medication, gallstones should be suspected, says Dr. Joel Richter, a gastroenterologist and chairman of the department of medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, in Philadelphia. 3. Stomach Ulcer Ulcers can cause a gnawing, burning sensation, usually felt in the upper abdomen. The pain can find its way up to the chest, Madanick says. Acid-suppressing medications may relieve ulcer pain. But ulcers are usually caused by Helicobacter pylori, a type of bacteri Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Gastroparesis

Type 2 Diabetes And Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis, also called delayed gastric emptying, is a disorder of the digestive tract that causes food to remain in the stomach for a period of time that is longer than average. This occurs because the nerves that move food through the digestive tract are damaged, so muscles don’t work properly. As a result, food sits in the stomach undigested. The most common cause of gastroparesis is diabetes. It can develop and progress over time, especially in those with uncontrolled blood sugar levels. The following are symptoms of gastroparesis: heartburn nausea vomiting of undigested food early fullness after a small meal weight loss bloating loss of appetite blood glucose levels that are hard to stabilize stomach spasms acid reflux Gastroparesis symptoms may be minor or severe, depending on the damage to the vagus nerve, a long cranial nerve that extends from the brain stem to the abdominal organs, including those of the digestive tract. Symptoms can flare up any time, but are more common after the consumption of high-fiber or high-fat foods, all of which are slow to digest. Women with diabetes have a high risk for developing gastroparesis. Other conditions can compound your risk of developing the disorder, including previous abdominal surgeries or a history of eating disorders. Diseases and conditions other than diabetes can cause gastroparesis, such as: viral infections acid reflux disease smooth muscle disorders Other illnesses can cause gastroparesis symptoms, including: Parkinson’s disease chronic pancreatitis cystic fibrosis kidney disease Turner’s syndrome Sometimes no known cause can be found, even after extensive testing. People who have gastroparesis have damage to their vagus nerve. This impairs nerve function and digestion because the impulses needed to chu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heartburn

Diabetes And Heartburn

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What can I take for heartburn? Not only am I diabetic but high blood pressure too. I'd prefer an all natural solution instead of meds. I thought my heartburn days were over since I cut out basically all sugar in my diet. Any thoughts? I like to use sugar-free peppermints for mild heartburn/indigestion...or try drinking a room-temp diet soda (carbonation will produce burps relieving gas/pressure). For more severe just I take OTC Tums/Rolaids or one of the Pepcid type meds. What can I take for heartburn? Not only am I diabetic but high blood pressure too. I'd prefer an all natural solution instead of meds. I thought my heartburn days were over since I cut out basically all sugar in my diet. Any thoughts? Hey Debbie! heartburn/indigestion seems to go hand in hand, some years ago I too suffered from this complaint, unfortunately we're are not alone, today in the UK 1 IN 3 adults experience this discomfort at least once a month, I hope I've put mind to rest. For those who're not familiar with what causes the complaint. Heartburn (also known as acid reflux) occurs when acid, which normally sits within the protected lining of the stomach, escapes back up into the oesophagus (food pipe). Because there is no protective coating in the oesophagus the acid irritates and damages the lining. This can cause painful symptoms such as burning, pain (behind the breastbone) and a feeling of sickness (often described as a 'bad taste in mouth'). Noted in your post I'd prefer an all natural solution instead of meds, you're free to try this herbal remedy, Dandelion root has been used orally for years to treat va Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Guide

Type 1 Diabetes Guide

Over time, diabetes can affect many parts of your body. One of those is the vagus nerve, which controls how quickly your stomach empties. When it's damaged, your digestion slows down and food stays in your body longer than it should. This is a condition called gastroparesis. It can make you feel queasy and vomit. It's also bad for your blood sugar levels. Although it's more common in people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 can also get it. Most people with gastroparesis have had diabetes for at least 10 years and also have other complications related to the disease. You may have: Heartburn or reflux (backup of stomach contents into the esophagus) Vomiting (in severe cases, this may happen daily) Feeling full quickly when eating Food that stays in your stomach too long can spoil and lead to the growth of bacteria. Undigested food can harden and form a lump called a bezoar. It can block your stomach and keep what you eat from moving into the small intestine. Gastroparesis can make it hard to control diabetes. When food finally does leave your stomach and enters the small intestine, your blood sugar goes up, too. Throwing up can also leave you dehydrated. Your doctor will ask about your symptoms. He’ll also do a physical exam, and he may check your blood sugar. He might also suggest other tests. Barium X-ray: You drink a liquid (barium), which coats your esophagus, stomach, and small intestine and shows up on X-rays. This test is also known as an upper GI (gastrointestinal) series or a barium swallow. Barium beefsteak meal: You eat a meal with barium in it, and the doctor uses an X-ray to watch how long it takes you to digest the food. That tells your doctor how quickly your stomach empties. Radioisotope gastric-emptying scan: You eat food that has a radioactive Continue reading >>

Heartburn (acid Reflux)

Heartburn (acid Reflux)

Heartburn is a feeling of burning in your chest, and is a symptom of acid reflux or GERD. People experience heartburn after eating specific foods or drinking certain beverages. Symptoms of acid reflux that may accompany heartburn include: regurgitation of foods or liquids with a taste of acid in the throat, and Diet and other lifestyle changes can alleviate heartburn for many people. Heartburn is more common during pregnancy. What is the definition of heartburn? Heartburn is a sensation of burning in the chest caused by stomach acid backing up into the esophagus (food pipe). The burning is usually in the upper and central part of the chest, just behind the sternum (breast bone). The burning can worsen or can be brought on by lying flat or on the right side. Pregnancy tends to aggravate heartburn. Many people experience heartburn and there are a large number of over-the-counter (OTC) medications and home remedies available to treat heartburn or the symptoms of heartburn. In most cases you will not need to see a health-care professional, except if the symptoms are frequent (several times a week) or severe. If heartburn is severe or the pain is accompanied with additional symptoms such as shortness of breath, radiation into your arms or neck, you will need to see a doctor to distinguish these symptoms from more serious medical conditions such as a heart attack. GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disease) is a chronic and more serious form of heartburn. If your heartburn symptoms occur more than twice a week you should see your health-care professional to make sure no serious problems are present. What does acid reflux look like? Acid reflux or GERD Heartburn: Causes, Symptoms, Remedies, Treatments Heartburn is a common cause of a burning sensation in the chest and chest pain. H Continue reading >>

Treatment For Ger & Gerd

Treatment For Ger & Gerd

You may be able to control gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) by not eating or drinking items that may cause GER, such as greasy or spicy foods and alcoholic drinks quitting smoking and avoiding secondhand smoke taking over-the-counter medicines, such as Maalox , or Rolaids Depending on the severity of your symptoms, your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes, medicines, surgery, or a combination. wear loose-fitting clothing around your abdomen. Tight clothing can squeeze your stomach area and push acid up into your esophagus . stay upright for 3 hours after meals. Avoid reclining and slouching when sitting. sleep on a slight angle. Raise the head of your bed 6 to 8 inches by safely putting blocks under the bedposts. Just using extra pillows will not help. Over-the-counter and prescription medicines You can buy many GERD medicines without a prescription. However, if you have symptoms that will not go away, you should see your doctor. All GERD medicines work in different ways. You may need a combination of GERD medicines to control your symptoms. Antacids. Doctors often first recommend antacids to relieve heartburn and other mild GER and GERD symptoms. Antacids include over-the-counter medicines such as Antacids can have side effects, including diarrhea and constipation . H2 blockers. H2 blockers decrease acid production. They provide short-term or on-demand relief for many people with GER and GERD symptoms. They can also help heal the esophagus, although not as well as other medicines. You can buy H2 blockers over-the-counter or your doctor can prescribe one. Types of H2 blockers include If you get heartburn after eating, your doctor may recommend that you take an antacid and an H2 blocker. The antacid neutralizes stomach acid, an Continue reading >>

Acid Reflux And Diabetes-what Are The Treatments And Remedies For Acid Reflux?

Acid Reflux And Diabetes-what Are The Treatments And Remedies For Acid Reflux?

Acid reflux and diabetes Acid reflux is a persistent disease that occurs when your food duct becomes irritated from bile or stomach acid backs up into it. Is there a connection between acid reflux and diabetes? Yes there is. But first, what is acid relflux disease? This is also known as GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). It is something that is common in people but increases with age. How is acid reflux and diabetes related? This is something that I will discuss shortly. First, I just wanted to go over the basics of this scary, annoying, and uncomfortable condition. I’ve had indigestion before as I’m sure every human being has had at some point in their life. I will cover everything from the symptoms, avoiding, treating, and more about GERD. Causes of acid reflux There can be multiple factors involved that affect GERD. So what these “factors” do is help to aid in relaxing or weakening the lower esophageal sphincter (a ring of muscle which surrounds and acts as a guard to open or close an opening or tube to the openings of the stomach. Your diet: Eating garlic and onions, tomatoes and citrus fruits, which are acidic, spicy foods, chocolate, anything minty, fried and fatty foods drinking alcohol, coffee, energy drinks, colas and teas, just to name a few. Your eating habits: I think we’ve all been guilty of eating too close to bedtime, eating too fast, and overeating at meal time. Don’t eat within a few hours of bedtime to give your stomach time to empty out and time enough for the production of acid to lessen. Alcohol: Drinking alcohol especially red wine is not a good idea. There’s a higher risk that acid from your stomach may back up. Smoking: Never good for any part of good health especially GERD. It weakens that sphincter (muscle) and increases refl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Acid Reflux

Diabetes And Acid Reflux

Many people with diabetes may also find that they have the additional issue of acid reflux. For some of these patients the reflux may be easily treated with dietary changes and PPI medications. Unfortunately there are some patients for which the standard treatment does not provide relief from the constant burning. The mechanisms for this hard to treat acid reflux are directly related to the diabetes. If diabetes has gone uncontrolled for a long period of time the resulting high blood sugars can cause nerve damage to many parts of the body including the vagus nerve that controls the stomach and intestines. When the vagus nerve is damaged or not working the muscles of the GI tract will not move food through efficiently and it will "back up" digestion and slow stomach emptying. This condition is called gastroparesis. Some of the additional symptoms of gastroparesis include: nausea, vomiting, feeling full quickly, bloating, weight loss, loss of appetite, stomach spasms and uncontrolled blood sugars. If you think that you may have gastroparesis caused by your diabetes please contact your doctor as soon as possible. They will need to manage the condition quickly to prevent additional complications from uncontrolled diabetes. Jennifer Rackley is a nutritionist and mother of three girls. Two of her children have dealt with acid reflux disease, food allergies, migraines, and asthma. She has a Bachelor of Science in dietetics from Harding University and has done graduate work in public health and nutrition through Eastern Kentucky University. In addition to writing for HealthCentral, she does patient consults and serves on the Board of Directors for the Pediatric Adolescent Gastroesophageal Reflux Association. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gerd: Diagnosis And Treatments

Diabetes And Gerd: Diagnosis And Treatments

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is no picnic, as many of you have attested to. Finding out that you have the condition is the first step; the second step is treating it. Constantly popping antacids is, at best, a Band-Aid, and it may not help. As I mentioned last week, if you have been bothered by symptoms of GERD (heartburn, feeling acid backing up into your throat, tightness in your throat, hoarseness, shortness of breath, or a bitter taste in your mouth), don’t delay: Talk with your health-care provider. Treating this condition promptly and effectively is important. I also mentioned that GERD seems to be more common in people with Type 2 diabetes. This may be, in part, due to being overweight, but it may also stem from having neuropathy, or nerve damage. Gastroparesis, a type of neuropathy, can contribute to GERD. All the more reason to report any symptoms to your provider. Diagnosis of GERD If you report any of the above symptoms to your health-care provider, he may start you right away on some form of treatment. Or, depending on the severity of your symptoms, you may be sent to a gastroenterologist for certain tests to confirm GERD and rule out other conditions. Typical tests include an upper GI series, which are x-rays of your esophagus, stomach, and part of your intestines. You may have an endoscopy, in which a tube with a little camera at the end is passed down your throat to look for signs of damage from acid reflux. Or you might have a test called esophageal manometry, which measures how well the esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter are working. Finally, you might also be given a 24-hour pH probe study, which measures how often you have acid reflux over the course of a day. Medical Treatments GERD is similar to diabetes in that it’s a chroni Continue reading >>

Severe Heartburn | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Severe Heartburn | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community » Could anybody offer any advice on this..... I've been T1 for about 4 years now. Not been too well controlled for the majority of that time. Over the past 6-7 months I've started getting heartburn but in the last month its become very severe. I only have to eat a ham sandwich and the next 4-5 hours are agony - like I've eaten glass. Over-the-counter 'remedies' such as Gaviscon will often work for half an hour, then it comes back with avengence. Is it related to diet? If so, what kinds of food bring it on? I make all my own food from scratch - usually soup! Don't eat cakes, pastries or spicy foods. As I said, sometimes drinking water can bring it on. Is it related to diabetes? I'm in my mid-twenties and in good health otherwise. I'd love to hear from anyone who has had a similar problem and how they remedied it. I'm not sure if its worthy of troubling my GP. i started out as undiagnosed diabetic for almost 2 years when i had terrible ''everything'' stomach problems, until i was beyond weak, i could barely eat anything, and woke up retching at 7am each day and would drive to the doctor/medical unit for an anti nausea injection, this went on for 2 months before the end; all the while i was blacking out 2-3 times a week during the last nine months. i was undiagnosed because my GP said i was crazy. three days after his final screeching fit that i was crazy, in the waiting room no less, i collapsed at his feet and went into a diabetic coma, at which point from a very far away place i could hear him screaming "wake up, wake, o sh*t what have i done, o god, o no!'' i eventually woke up with totally white hair, the RIp Van Winkle effect, when the twit fi Continue reading >>

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