diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Has Reached Epidemic Proportions

What Caused This Epidemic, And Why Is Patient Education Important?

What Caused This Epidemic, And Why Is Patient Education Important?

Non-insulin dependent Diabetes, or Type II Diabetes, is sometimes referred to as “adult-onset” diabetes. This disease has reached epidemic proportions all over the globe, with China as an “epicenter” of increased prevalence of Type II Diabetes. Diabetes is more than a disease involving just an elevation of blood sugar levels. The CDC, in 2014, claimed that 1/3 of Americans are Pre-Diabetic, and 29 million people in the US are diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. In 2001, the established research model did not predict such a high prevalence until year 2050. In 2012 alone, the financial deficit due to to Diabetes and Diabetes-related health problems in the United States was 245 Billion Dollars, after all health care costs and lost productivity figures were calculated. This disease and its co-morbid conditions are requiring more and more of our valuable resources. What Is Type II Diabetes? This type of Diabetes is not the result of insufficient insulin production; it is actually the result of too much insulin chronically produced, usually from excess dietary intake of carbohydrates (sugars). The constant overabundance of insulin levels make the body “resistant” to the signals sent by insulin acting on the receptors. The onset of Type II Diabetes, or non-insulin dependent Diabetes, begins with a cellular insensitivity to insulin, also called Insulin-Resistance. This ineffective use of insulin allows high levels of glucose to build up in the blood rather than be transported to various tissues as a fuel source. Insulin resistance and the inability to utilize insulin essentially starves the cells within muscle, fat, and liver tissues from the primary fuel source, glucose. This cell starvation then signals the pancreas to increase its output of insulin. Increase of weig Continue reading >>

The Terrifying Rise Of Diabetes, In Every Corner Of The U.s.

The Terrifying Rise Of Diabetes, In Every Corner Of The U.s.

Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S., due to sugary diets and the lack of exercise. If current disease rates continue, one in three Americans will have diabetes by 2050. Over time, the condition can lead to kidney failure, limb amputations and blindness, among other complications. That Data Dude created this interactive map showing the percent of the current population that has been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Colorado stands out by far as the healthiest state by this measure: In many of its counties, 4 percent or less of the population has been diagnosed with diabetes. South Dakota, Alabama, Mississippi, Montana, West Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina are at the opposite end of the scale. In counties in South Dakota, North Carolina, and Mississippi more than 14 percent of the population had been diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. The map shows that only 10 counties in the U.S. experienced a decrease in diabetes rates between 2004 and 2012: McCracken County, Kentucky Arlington County, Virginia Hawaii County, Hawaii Beckham County, Oklahoma San Francisco County, California Roosevelt County, Montana Cuming County, Nebraska Mellette County, South Dakota Preston County, West Virginia Logan County, Nebraska In five more counties, in Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, Virginia and Washington, rate remained unchanged. But in all the other counties in the U.S. – that’s 2,992 of them – diabetes prevalence has gone up. More stories from Know More, Wonkblog's social media site: - Premature death among American women is on par with Mexico, even though the U.S. spends 10 times as much Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Two major forms of diabetes mellitus are: type 1 -- previously called insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile-onset diabetes type 2 --previously called noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes (AODM) Type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions and is a major cause of cardiovascular disease Sort Two major forms of diabetes mellitus are: type 1 -- previously called insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile-onset diabetes type 2 --previously called noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes (AODM) Type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions and is a major cause of cardiovascular disease Two major forms of diabetes mellitus are: type 1 -- previously called insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile-onset diabetes type 2 --previously called noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes (AODM) Type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions and is a major cause of cardiovascular disease Type 1 diabetes mellitus SYMPTOMS polyuria polydipsia weight loss hyperglycemia acidosis ketosis Type 2 diabetes mellitus SYMPTOMS fatigue blurred vision thirst hyperglycemia may have neural or vascular complication Continue reading >>

Original Article..

Original Article..

pISSN: 0976 3325 eISSN: 2229 6816Â Original Article.. PREVALENCE OF OBESITY AND ITS ASSOCIATED CO MORBIDITIES AMONGST ADULTS Jayashree Sachin Gothankar1 1Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University Medical College, Pune, Maharashtra, India Correspondence: Dr. Mrs.Jayashree Sachin Gothankar Manik, 31-Meghana soc.Dhomkar Road Sahakarnagar no. 2, Pune-411009 [email protected] Telephone number: +91-9423037645 ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate association of obesity with common co morbidities like hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Background: Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in India. The health consequences of obesity range from increased risk of premature death to serious chronic conditions like hypertension and type 2 diabetes which reduces overall quality of life. BMI and waist circumference are useful guide to assess obesity related health risks. Material and methods: A cross sectional study done on 53 adult subjects attending diabetes and hypertension detection camp organized at an urban health training center of a private Medical College , Pune. Results: Prevalence of obesity was 43 % among adults. There was statistically significant association between BMI (>=25) and diabetes (p<0.05) and BMI and hypertension (p<0.05).In females central obesity (waist circumference >=80) was statistically associated with diabetes and hypertension. Diabetes and hypertension did not found to be associated with central obesity in male (p>0.05). Conclusion: Obesity as assessed by BMI and waist circumference is associated with hypertension and diabetes. Thus approaches to reduce the risk of developing hypertension and diabetes may include prevention of overweight and obesity. Key words: Obesity, BMI, Waist Cir Continue reading >>

Globalization Of Diabetes

Globalization Of Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a global public health crisis that threatens the economies of all nations, particularly developing countries. Fueled by rapid urbanization, nutrition transition, and increasingly sedentary lifestyles, the epidemic has grown in parallel with the worldwide rise in obesity. Asia's large population and rapid economic development have made it an epicenter of the epidemic. Asian populations tend to develop diabetes at younger ages and lower BMI levels than Caucasians. Several factors contribute to accelerated diabetes epidemic in Asians, including the “normal-weight metabolically obese” phenotype; high prevalence of smoking and heavy alcohol use; high intake of refined carbohydrates (e.g., white rice); and dramatically decreased physical activity levels. Poor nutrition in utero and in early life combined with overnutrition in later life may also play a role in Asia's diabetes epidemic. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology, but currently identified genetic loci are insufficient to explain ethnic differences in diabetes risk. Nonetheless, interactions between Westernized diet and lifestyle and genetic background may accelerate the growth of diabetes in the context of rapid nutrition transition. Epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials show that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through diet and lifestyle modifications. Translating these findings into practice, however, requires fundamental changes in public policies, the food and built environments, and health systems. To curb the escalating diabetes epidemic, primary prevention through promotion of a healthy diet and lifestyle should be a global public policy priority. THE GLOBAL BURDEN OF TYPE Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Now Affecting Children

Type 2 Diabetes Now Affecting Children

Type 2 Diabetes Now Affecting Children Type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, and the statistics continue to grow with no change in site. To make matters worse, type 2 diabetes is no longer a disease of older adults, but children and young adults as well. In a July 2008 article published in the Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine, pediatric endocrinologist Joyce Lee, M.D. stated: “Recent studies suggest that there have been dramatic increases in type 2 diabetes among individuals in their 20s and 30s, whereas it used to be that individuals developed type 2 diabetes in their late 50s or 60s…” And data from the 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet reported this startling new statistic: Children Under 20 years of age: 215,000, or 0.26% of all people in this age group have diabetes About 1 in every 400 children and adolescents has diabetes What is it in today’s society that is causing an increase in disease despite all the claims of western medicine superiority? The answer to this question is the dividing line between the two distinct ideologies of thinking: Reductionist and Holistic. It isn’t any coincidence that the multidimensional medical framework consists of the AMA, FDA, EPA, and WHO. These groups together form the “Perfect Storm” of societal sickness. The cause of any disease is not simple. Like a jigsaw puzzle, it takes many missing pieces in order for you to recognize the picture. Puzzle of Health The same is true with your health. Let’s put together a puzzle (one piece at a time) to illustrate how disease affects health. If you eat/drink chemical-ridden processed foods (1 piece) and processed sugars (1 piece), you are not consuming whole natural fruits and vegetables (1 piece), you are drinking chemical-laced ta Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes Has Reached Epidemic Proportions - Who

Prevalence Of Diabetes Has Reached Epidemic Proportions - Who

Accra, June 14, GNA - With current prevalence reaching epidemic proportions, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has predicted that developing countries would bear the brunt of diabetes in the 21st Century. It said available statistics indicated that currently more than 70 per cent of people with diabetes lived in low and middle income countries, with prevalence increasing dramatically in Africa with an estimated 10.4 million people with the condition in 2007. In Ghana about four million people may be affected with diabetes mellitus, which is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar, a condition which could be attributed to a situation where either the body does not produce enough insulin, or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced, but it could be controlled and managed with little injections of insulin. Diabetes is said to be one of the rising killer diseases globally, claiming one life every eight seconds and a limb lost at every 30 seconds, according to reports from WHO and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). In a speech read for him, Mr Alban Kingsford Sumana Bagbin, Minister of Health at the opening session of a three-day Training Workshop for Diabetes Nurse Educators in Accra on Wednesday, said the Atlas of IDF showed that the number of people with diabetes in Africa would increase by 80 per cent to 18.7 million by 2025. The Sector Minister noted that currently, Ghana Health Service had a doctor to population ratio of one to11,929, stressing the fact that lack of financial means was not the only challenge, but a scarcity of trained health care personnel, capable to tackle the prevention, diagnosis and management of diabetes at all levels of the health care systems. The workshop was organised by Ithemba Fou Continue reading >>

10 Facts On Obesity

10 Facts On Obesity

Obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally, with at least 2.8 million people dying each year as a result of being overweight or obese. Once associated with high-income countries, obesity is now also prevalent in low- and middle-income countries. Governments, international partners, civil society, non-governmental organizations and the private sector all have vital roles to play in contributing to obesity prevention. Fact 1: Overweight and obesity are defined as "abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair health" Body mass index (BMI) – the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters (kg/m2) – is a commonly used index to classify overweight and obesity in adults. WHO defines overweight as a BMI equal to or more than 25, and obesity as a BMI equal to or more than 30. Fact 2: More than 1.9 billion adults were overweight in 2016, and 650 million obese In 2016, more than 1.9 billion adults were overweight and 650 million were obese. At least 2.8 million people each year die as a result of being overweight or obese. The prevalence of obesity nearly tripled between 1975 and 2016. Once associated with high-income countries, obesity is now also prevalent in low- and middle-income countries. Fact 3: Globally, 41 million preschool children were overweight in 2016 Childhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century. Overweight children are likely to become obese adults. They are more likely than non-overweight children to develop diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age, which in turn are associated with a higher chance of premature death and disability. Fact 4: Overweight and obesity are linked to more deaths worldwide than underweight Most of the world's population live in a country wh Continue reading >>

Naturerevgastrohep

Naturerevgastrohep

Tweets from the eds of Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology - news, views, reviews, Editors' picks & conference tweets Continue reading >>

Diabetes Has Reached Epidemic Proportions

Diabetes Has Reached Epidemic Proportions

It is currently estimated that 366 million people worldwide currently suffer from diabetes. It is not a benign disease and it kills one person every seconds throughout the world. Healthcare systems have taken heed and have begun to work on programs to detect diabetes early, prevent diabetes altogether and treat the disease in the best possible way. While there is both type I diabetes and type II diabetes, the vast majority of sufferers have type II disease. It is believed to be caused by obesity, poor diet, lack of exercise and generally not taking care of oneself. It is not just a disease of developed countries. People in developing countries are slowly catching up in incidence and unfortunately have a lesser degree of treatment available to them. Diabetics cannot control the amount of sugar in their diet due to insulin resistance and the inability of insulin to put sugar into the cells. The more Western the diet in the individual, the greater is the incidence of diabetes. Side effects of untreated diabetes include blindness, stroke and peripheral vascular and nerve damage. Deaths from diabetes directly have reached 4.6 million people per year worldwide. Meetings are scheduled on an international level to find out ways to stop this epidemic. Such ways need to be acceptable to all ethnicities and nationalities of the world and should focus on increasing the level of personal exercise, decreasing weight and eating a diet with less processed foods and sugary foods. This can be a big bill to fill as different cultures accept exercise and weight management differently. Some people believe the fight should be at the corporate level with fewer companies providing packaged foods to the poor and more companies practicing preventative programs for their employees who can be scre Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Complications Of Diabetes

Cardiovascular Complications Of Diabetes

Globally, the incidence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions. The cardiovascular complications from diabetes lead to significant morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will look at the impact of diabetes on health and healthcare, particularly that related to cardiovascular complications. We will also explore our current understanding of the strong links that exist between diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the key role played by primary care physicians in helping patients with diabetes reduce their risk of future CVD. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Has Reached Epidemic Proportions In India, Says Expert (nov 14 Is World Diabetes Day)

Diabetes Has Reached Epidemic Proportions In India, Says Expert (nov 14 Is World Diabetes Day)

Aligarh, Nov 13 (IANS) Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in the country and is increasing with 'tsunamic' speed, a top expert of the Aligarh Muslim University (AMU) said here Saturday. 'More than 75 percent of heart attack patients are either diabetic or undiagnosed. A vast majority of patients undergoing renal dialysis and transplants have diabetes as the underlying cause,' said Prof. Jamal Ahmad, director, Centre of Diabetes and Endocrinology, J.N. Medical College, AMU. He said the country had 50 million diabetes patients, and more than 95 percent of the population suffers from some form of the disease. 'Early diagnoses and optimal management can significantly decrease the mortality associated with this dreaded disease,' he said. Listing out the various preventive steps, Prof. Ahmad said brisk walking for half-an-hour every day can significantly reduce its risk. He also advocated giving up smoking and alcohol, reducing salt and trans-fat intake (present in junk food) and switching to a vegetarian diet. World Diabetes Day was introduced in 1991 by International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organisation. It is held on the birth anniversary of Frederick Banting, who along with Charles Best, is credited with discovering insulin, a hormone which regulates carbohydrates and fat. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Has Reached Epidemic Proportions

Diabetes Has Reached Epidemic Proportions

The fastest growing disease in the world today is not an infectious disease. Three million people die a year from this disease and 6 million people a year get this disease for the first time. It has increased in the last twenty years by 767% and continues to rise. Diabetes Mellitus is without a doubt the fastest growing disease in the world and it can be stopped but not by some fancy vaccination yet. Half of all the people in the world who have diabetes don't even know it. When left untreated, the effects of this disease include blindness, amputated limbs, and heart disease. Experts say that it is because of over-eating and incorrect carbohydrate consumption which usually causes type II diabetes. But they also say that it is because of inactivity as people generally are leading more sedentary lifestyles. Obviously genetics has an important role to play in the chances of you becoming diabetic. Science says that in order to become diabetic you need to have inherited chromosomes D3 and D4 from your parents. But having these genes and knowing that you have these genes does not stop you getting diabetes. New scientific research has revealed the possibility of the little known substance called Leptin which plays a significant if not primary role in heart disease, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, autoimmune diseases, reproductive disorders, and perhaps the rate of aging itself. High Leptin levels affect the way that your body responds to inflammation, and Leptin also helps to mediate the manufacture of other very potent inflammatory chemicals from fat cells that also play a significant role in the progression of heart disease and diabetes. There are a few basics that are needed in order to directly affect the production of Leptin in your body. Making sure that you eat correctl Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that has reached epidemic proportions in the western nations of the world. It has been estimated that one of every five people born after the year 2000 will develop diabetes in their lifetime. More than 16 million Americans already suffer from this disease. Diabetes is manifest by the loss of the ability to control the amount of sugar (glucose) present in the blood. Normal control of blood glucose is essential for good health and well-being. Blood glucose levels are maintained within certain limits as a result of the effects of a hormone called Insulin on various tissues and organs in the body. If the concentration of blood glucose strays outside of the normal limits, as it does in untreated diabetes, serious and sometimes fatal consequences can occur. Insulin is produced by specialized cells called “ß-cells” that are located in the pancreas. There are two major subtypes of diabetes: HPRL is working to develop novel treatments for both Type I and Type II Diabetes. Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Epidemic : What Is Diabetes And Why Is It A Problem? [article]

The Diabetes Epidemic : What Is Diabetes And Why Is It A Problem? [article]

This is the first of three articles on diabetes. This article looks at how blood sugar is normally controlled and what happens in Diabetes. It also covers why Diabetes is such a problem. The next two articles will look at Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes seperately and in more depth. Diabetes is a disease that has reached epidemic proportions both internationally and within New Zealand. It is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputations in the world. So what is this horrible disease? How do we get it? And let’s face it – we are personal trainers not physiologists. How much do we really need to understand about the disease to train our Diabetic clients effectively? Normal Glucose Metabolism To understand Diabetes we first need to recap how glucose (blood sugar) is normally regulated in our bodies. Insulin and glucagon are the two hormones that keep our glucose levels controlled. Insulin is released from the beta cells on our pancreas when glucose levels are high. Insulin helps move glucose from the blood stream into our muscles and liver, and stores any extra glucose as fat. Glucose cannot enter your body’s cells from the bloodstream by itself, so insulin acts like a ‘key’. Once released into the blood, insulin binds to insulin receptors (the ‘keyholes’) located on the cell walls, ‘unlocking’ the cell and allowing the glucose to enter. This glucose can either be used immediately as energy or stored as glycogen or fat for future use. When blood glucose levels are low, insulin secretion is decreased, and the hormone glucagon is released from the pancreas instead. Glucagon works to break down the glycogen stores in the liver. This glucose is then released back into the bloodstream to raise the low glucose levels, meaning there is a c Continue reading >>

More in diabetes