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Diabetes Has Become An Epidemic

What Are The Most Comfortable Shoes?

What Are The Most Comfortable Shoes?

This question should ask what's the most comfortable shoes I can be seen in public wearing? I sold shoes for 13 years and I learned that comfort isn't a brand because there will always be a style within that brand that just sucks. Brands used to be more consistent, but today they're not. Rigidity is the answer and most people who get the advice to buy a rigid shoe will still get the concept wrong when trying to buy a shoe. I will go into detail about sole thickness, leather quality, cushioning and breathability later but right now I'm talking about rigidity. A shoe needs to be rigid from the ball to the heel. Next time you're shopping for shoes, pick up a shoe and bend it. It's okay if it bends in the front at the ball and across the toe box- but if it bends at the shank ( the narrowest part of the outsole) it won't be comfortable. Most shoe manufacturers are aware of this and if the shoe isn't sturdy enough on it's own will add a metal piece to the midsole to stiffen the shank area. This explained why so many of my customers were surprised how comfortable their Italian loafers were. Sure the leather was thin soft and you could bend them straight in half, but you couldn't bend them one bit at the shank because they had a steel piece creating a rigidity. The steel piece is actually supporting your arch. That's right! -the mechanism supporting your arch is inside the shoe. Most people think it's the curvature or contour of the insole. It's not. The shape and contour of the footbed has nothing to do with the amount of support your arch is getting. It's just a gimmick to sell shoes and if you bought a shoe with a fancy arched footbed and it was really comfortable, it's because it had a shank inside. This explains why Dansko's are in the comfort conversation. They're the epi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is 'epidemic' With 400 Million Sufferers Worldwide: Number With Condition Set To Soar By 55% Within 20 Years Unless Humans Change Way They Eat And Exercise

Diabetes Is 'epidemic' With 400 Million Sufferers Worldwide: Number With Condition Set To Soar By 55% Within 20 Years Unless Humans Change Way They Eat And Exercise

Diabetes has become a global epidemic, affecting one in 12 adults, scientists say. And the number of sufferers is set to soar by 55 per cent in the next two decades unless the human population drastically changes the way it eats and exercises. The study by researchers at the University of East Anglia estimates that 382million people had diabetes in 2013. At current rates, that figure is expected to reach 592million by 2035. Around 10 per cent of sufferers have type 1 diabetes – an auto-immune disorder that is usually present from childhood. But the other 90 per cent have type 2 diabetes – an illness driven by a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet. The chronic illness is a particular problem in fast-developing countries. In China and India, almost 10 per cent of adults have diabetes, compared with the global average of 8.3 per cent, reveals the study published in the journal Pharmaco Economics. In Britain, around 3.2million people have diabetes. Lead researcher Till Seuring said: ‘Diabetes has become an epidemic. ‘The rising prevalence of diabetes in these countries has been fuelled by rapid urbanization, changing eating habits, and increasingly sedentary lifestyles. ‘Diabetes affects 382 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to grow to 592 million by 2035. ‘It is a chronic disease that has spread widely in recent decades - not only in high-income countries, but also in many populous low and middle-income countries such as India and China.’ He added: ‘We would hope that the findings further increase the policy attention being paid to diabetes prevention and management in rich countries and it should in particular make health and economic policymakers in developing countries aware of the economic damage that diabetes can do.’ The study, pub Continue reading >>

The Looming Public Health Crises Threatening To Take Down China’s Health Care System

The Looming Public Health Crises Threatening To Take Down China’s Health Care System

The slender, steel needle pierced Mary Shi’s pudgy belly. The sharp point pricked her skin and as her thumb pushed down on the syringe, cloudy insulin began to swim in her bloodstream. Shi was running out of places to inject herself: her stomach, arms and legs all bore the bruising from regular shots. More importantly, she was tired of having to forgo wearing T-shirts and skirts for clothes that would strategically cover her body when she went out for afternoon tea with her girlfriends in Shanghai. “When you can stand the psychosocial burden of diabetes and social discrimination, injections are really a piece of cake,” said Shi, a 30-year-old app developer. Shi was diagnosed as a diabetic when she was 18. She had been studying for the highly competitive gaokao college entrance exam when she fainted at school. An emergency doctor explained that Shi had diabetes and if the illness was left unregulated, she’d be blind within five years. Her bewildered parents became depressed and Shi came to resent the disease and the rules it imposed on her lifestyle, hiding her illness from her friends for several years. Shi is one of millions of people caught in China’s diabetes epidemic. In the 1980s diabetes was a rarity affecting just one percent of China’s population. Now, due to rapid economic development, and the subsequent growth in availability of high-calorie diets, cars and sedentary lifestyles, China has the highest number of diabetics in the world, totaling 109 million people in 2015—roughly 11 percent of the population. That makes China home to a third of the world’s diabetic population. The scale of this public health problem is huge, particularly because it comes at a time when the country’s health system as a whole is under reform, moving from a rudimen Continue reading >>

Cities Are The Front Line In The Global Diabetes Epidemic

Cities Are The Front Line In The Global Diabetes Epidemic

Today, 437 million people worldwide have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. New estimates published this month show that three-quarters of a billion people could have the disease by 2045 — and cities are the front line of this challenge. As the growth fast becomes unmanageable for health systems, shortening the lives of millions of urban citizens and constraining economic growth, Novo Nordisk is working with a coalition of major cities to bend the curve on type 2 diabetes. We’re calling for local political and health leaders of all cities to ask what it will take to change the trajectory of the disease in their area and to put into practice the new models that we are forging. A rapidly urbanizing world is changing not just where we live but also how we live. As my predecessor at Novo Nordisk wrote, the way cities are designed, built, and run creates health benefits for citizens — but critically it also creates risks. Towns and cities, where half of the world’s population now lives, are home to two-thirds of people with diabetes. That’s why when we initiated the Cities Changing Diabetes program in 2014, we set out to put a spotlight on urban diabetes. This effort has grown into a global partnership of nine major cities, home to over 75 million people, and over 100 expert partners united in the fight against urban diabetes. Without concerted action, health systems around the world will reach a point in coming decades when they won’t be able to effectively treat patients sustainably. We conservatively estimate that the related costs of diabetes — including medication, supplies, hospital care, and the treatment of complications — will exceed $1 trillion a year by 2045. The catastrophic rise in diabetes won’t be stemmed by medicine alone. That’s why cities need t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Has Become A Full-blown Epidemic

Diabetes Has Become A Full-blown Epidemic

Diabetes is a major public health problem -- an epidemic -- in the United States. One out of 10 people over the age of 20 now has diabetes -- primarily Type 2 or "adult onset" diabetes -- and the disease is rapidly increasing. This increase has been particularly striking in the several Southeastern states comprising what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls the "Diabetes Belt." In Kentucky, for example, one out of eight people now has the disease, a frightening fact. Even more frightening is the fact that 25 percent of those with diabetes do not know they have the disease! If this epidemic is not interrupted, by 2050 about one out of three people in this country will have diabetes. For minorities, that figure will be closer to one out of two. Diabetes itself poses a significant health problem, but the real burden of the disease is its complications. These complications are BAD: Blindness, Amputations and Dialysis. The high blood sugar levels characteristic of diabetes, plus the effects of high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels, damage both small and large blood vessels. Over time, those with diabetes frequently go blind, have a toe or foot amputated, lose the functioning of their kidneys and then frequently die of a stroke or heart attack. The cost of diabetes is staggering. In 2025, the annual direct and indirect cost of diabetes to the country is projected to exceed $500 billion. Here's what we need to do about this epidemic. First, we need to focus on primary prevention of the disease, and that means stressing proper nutrition and regular exercise. Early childhood is the time to begin good dietary habits, and the conscious selection of food for school snacks and lunches provides an excellent opportunity for establishing these habits. With Continue reading >>

Diabetes Has Stealthily Become An Epidemic

Diabetes Has Stealthily Become An Epidemic

William Herman has spent decades researching diabetes, treating patients grappling with complications and trying to educate people on prevention. During those same years, he also has seen the prevalence of the disease grow virtually unabated. “It really is an epidemic, both in the U.S. and globally,” said Herman, director of the University of Michigan’s Center for Diabetes Translational Research and a consultant to the World Health Organization. The statistics are staggering. More than 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes — but a quarter of them don’t yet realize it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An additional 86 million Americans have pre-diabetes, which is marked by higher-than-normal blood-sugar levels and puts them at an elevated risk of developing diabetes. The WHO estimates that nearly 350 million people worldwide have the condition. Year after year, diabetes exacts a massive human and economic toll. Those who have it are at a higher risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and blindness, and of losing toes, feet and legs to amputation. “The costs of diabetes are enormous, and they are growing,” Herman said. “People with diabetes account for a substantial portion of the total cost of health care in the United States.” Medical expenses tend to be twice as high, on average, for people with diabetes than for those without the disease. The American Diabetes Association estimates that treating patients with the disease accounts for more than $1 of every $5 spent on health care in the United States. “It has affected all segments of the population,” said Edward Gregg, chief of the epidemiology and statistics branch of the CDC’s diabetes division. “But it hasn’t affected Continue reading >>

Diabetes: America's Newest Health Epidemic (infographic)

Diabetes: America's Newest Health Epidemic (infographic)

As one of today’s fastest growing health challenges, diabetes has become increasingly prevalent in the United States. In fact, the number of Americans diagnosed with diabetes has risen from 10.4 million people in 1998 to 21 million people today, according to the CDC, and the number is expected to rise even more in the near future. The American Diabetes Association projects that one in three Americans living today will eventually develop diabetes, and that by 2050, the number of diagnoses will increase by 165 percent. As we recognize American Diabetes Month during November, let’s take a closer look at why more people are developing the disease and what our UnityPoint Clinic providers say we can do to reverse this trend. The Rise of Diabetes in the United States The number of people living with diabetes isn’t just up in the United States, but all over the world. While diabetes is now a problem that affects people everywhere, the CDC estimates that as many as 29.1 million Americans have diabetes (21 million who are diagnosed and another 8.1 million who are undiagnosed). This means that over 9 percent of the United States population has some form of diabetes. The rise in diabetes incidence across the United States is largely linked to the following three factors: More Americans are becoming overweight or obese and increasingly physically inactive – both known risk factors for diabetes. A person’s chances of developing diabetes increases with age. Now that the baby-boomer population is aging, more people from this generation are being diagnosed with the disease. Type 2 diabetes is especially common among African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans and certain Asian populations, which are all growing populations in the United States. Diabetes Complications Type 2 D Continue reading >>

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

You’ve become the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal of medicine. A must-read every morning. ” Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Became A Global Epidemic

How Diabetes Became A Global Epidemic

The rate of type two diabetes continues to rise around the world, and many experts agree that it has become a global health crisis. Worldwide, the rate of diabetes increased by about 8 percent in men and nearly 10 percent in women from 1980 to 2008, according to a 2011 study published in the journal Lancet. The study, which tracked diabetes trends in 200 countries over the past three decades, found that nearly one in ten adults worldwide have some form of diabetes. The primary causes of this preventable disease are related to a poor diet and lack of exercise. Educating the world population on the importance of a healthy lifestyle is the best way to avert this public health crisis. Preventative care is the easiest way to keep individuals, families and communities healthy and active. Global Rise in Diabetes Diabetes is the condition in which the body does not properly process food for use as energy, and it manifests in the body in two ways, according to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Type one diabetes is an autoimmune disease that begins in childhood and requires an individual to take insulin. Type two diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed diabetes cases, according to the CDC and is controlled by insulin, pills and in some cases by weight loss and exercise. Type two diabetes usually comes on after the age of 25. According to the results of the Lancet study the disease is most common in the islands of the South Pacific, Saudi Arabia, China, and India. Among high-income countries the rise in the US is the steepest. The study found that between 1980 and 2008, the number of diabetics more than doubled from 153 million to 347 million. About 30 percent of that increase came from a rise in disease across all age groups. About 30 percent cam Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Becoming A Childhood Epidemic | Miami Herald

Type 2 Diabetes Becoming A Childhood Epidemic | Miami Herald

Before, the only people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes were older adults. However, times have changed. In the past 20 years, new cases of Type 2 diabetes in childhood have increased from less than 5 percent to more than 20 percent of all new diagnoses. What is causing this disturbing trend? What is Type 2 diabetes, and how can we protect our children from this disease? Type 2 diabetes is the form of diabetes in which the body is resistant to the action of insulin. Insulin levels rise, and when the body can no longer make enough insulin, blood sugars rise. This is different from Type 1 diabetes, in which the body stops making insulin. Although Type 1 diabetes is still more common among children, Type 2 diabetes — previously called adult onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes — is becoming more common among adolescents and even younger children. Type 2 diabetes occurs in children as young as 6, and is increasing at an alarming rate, primarily due to the epidemic of obesity in children and adolescents. Type 2 diabetes is also more common among some ethnic groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans. Another risk factor is a family history of Type 2 diabetes or if diabetes occurred in the mother during pregnancy. Never miss a local story. Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access. SUBSCRIBE NOW There are a number signs parents should watch for if they suspect their child has diabetes, including: ▪ Frequent urination or new bed-wetting. ▪ Increased thirst and appetite. ▪ Decreased energy. ▪ Unexplained weight loss. ▪ Genital yeast infection. Another sign that your child is at risk for Type 2 diabetes is the appearance of darker and thicker skin on your child’s neck or armpits, which may make skin app Continue reading >>

We Give You The Tools To Heal Yourself

We Give You The Tools To Heal Yourself

Important Note about HMC Parking: Due to construction projects in the area, please allow extra time to park and walk to HMC. Click here for some helpful parking options Type II diabetes has become an epidemic, but there is a lot we can do to stop it dead in its tracks. Like so many situations in life, there are lifestyle solutions that are often challenging to sustain. In addition, there are both pharmaceutical and natural alternatives in the form of supplements and herbs that can be used to support this effort. Few knowledgeable healthcare practitioners would argue that diet, exercise, adequate sleep, stress reduction, weight management, detoxification, and good spiritual health are vital to being healthy whether you have diabetes or not. It is well known that all of these factors have a profound effect on how well insulin works—insulin sensitivity—in the human body, and that this is a very important cornerstone in preventing and managing people with diabetes. Several decades ago Gerald Reaven, MD, from Stanford University, pioneered the concept that insulin sensitivity is one of the earliest signs of type II diabetes, and that it has profound effects on our health. Dr. Reaven coined the term “syndrome X” to describe this disorder, but today it is more commonly known as “the metabolic syndrome.” This condition is characterized by the presence of hypertension, abdominal obesity, elevated blood fats, and the premature development of arteriosclerosis (which causes heart attacks, strokes, kidney disease, and peripheral vascular disease). There are an estimated 75 million Americans with the metabolic syndrome. Most of the time people are unaware that they have this disorder until it has already caused significant, and often irreversible, damage to their bodies. Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes Has Become An Epidemic For Americans

Pre-diabetes Has Become An Epidemic For Americans

If you have pre-diabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes, especially to your heart, blood vessels, and kidneys, may have already begun, according to the Mayo Clinic. “Starting at age 45, we should be screening every three years for type 2 diabetes. However, some people are at risk even earlier than that,” said Dr. Amber Champion, a Mercy Medical Center endocrinologist. About 29 million Americans have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association; 86 million people have pre-diabetes, which means the blood sugar level is higher than normal. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine found something more effective than any drug in reducing diabetes risk, especially if you’re pre-diabetic. “Losing weight can really be beneficial in preventing the onset or delaying the onset of diabetes for many years,” said Champion. Champion says if you’re overweight, reduce your body weight by just 5 to 7 percent, exercise at least 30 minutes, five times a week, and cut back on sugary drinks. Also, try to make vegetables 50 percent of each meal and increase your fiber intake. These lifestyle changes reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by as much as 58 percent. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says as many as 30 percent of those with pre-diabetes progress to diabetes within five years. Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Transferable?

Is Diabetes Transferable?

First of all, diabetes is definitely not contagious. There a two types of diabetes. Both of them aren't curable, but with the right treatment, people can live just about as long as any other healthy person. Type 1: ... is an autoimmune disorder. The immune system destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreasas as an overreaction, so that for people suffering from type 1 diabetes, insulin is essential for survival. Most likely, type 1 diabetes is diagnosed in the childhood. Though it's rare, it's also possible to develope it about the age of thirty. The patients need to inject insulin several times of the day, every time they eat or their blood sugar appears to be too high. Plus, they need to consider very different things, challenging their lifestyle. Type 2: ... begins with an insulin resistance one can manage at first by dietary changes and by increasing exercise. If that isn't successful anymore, one gets oral anti diabetics, and if that on the other hand isn't successful enough anymore, one starts slowly with injecting insulin, still taking the oral anti diabetics. The treatment consistently gets adjusted on the state of health of the particular patient by their doctors. Though you have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, if your ancestors suffered from it, the chance of getting ill are only highly increased, if you get overweight and if you underexercise. If you know that, you can avoid further increasing the risk. If there is only one side if ancestors in which someone had a type 2 diabetes, your chances to get it are at approximately 10%, if that is the case on both sides, there is a 30% - if you're overweight. One could also add a type 3 and a type 4 to that list, if one considers gestational diabetes, a condition in which the insulin re Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Kids: The Growing Epidemic

Type 2 Diabetes And Kids: The Growing Epidemic

Before the obesity epidemic in the United States, type 2 diabetes was practically unheard of in people under 30. That explains the former name for the disease: adult-onset diabetes. Not long ago, almost all children with diabetes suffered from the type 1 form of the disease, which means their bodies couldn't produce enough insulin. And type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas may produce normal insulin levels but cells become resistant to it, typically took decades to develop. But type 2 diabetes isn't just for adults anymore. The number of children and adolescents with the condition (most of whom are diagnosed in their early teens) has skyrocketed over the last 20 years and is still climbing, prompting experts to call it an epidemic. Because young children who are obese are more likely to become diabetic when they're older, experts are paying particular attention to how much -- or how little -- pre-adolescents eat and exercise. Disease researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) made the prediction that one in three children born in the United States in 2000 will likely develop type 2 diabetes sometime in their lifetime unless they get more exercise and improve their diets. The prediction was especially serious for Latino children. Without changes in diet and exercise, their odds of developing diabetes during their lifetime were about 50-50. Type 2 is not usually as life-threatening or dramatic as type 1 at the time of diagnosis, but it does increase the likelihood that children may develop serious long-term complications in later life such as blindness, kidney disease, and heart disease. With proper medical treatment and a self-care program that incorporates exercise, glucose monitoring, and nutrition, however, your child can likely keep his or h Continue reading >>

Canada Still Has A Chance To Reverse Its Diabetes Epidemic

Canada Still Has A Chance To Reverse Its Diabetes Epidemic

Earlier this year I retired after a dozen years as president of Innovative Medicines Canada. Shortly after I took an assignment with the Canadian Diabetes Association and the opportunity to work on what is one of Canada's largest and most perplexing challenges: our diabetes epidemic. For years public health authorities have been sounding the alarm. But the tone has become more urgent in recent years -- with terms like "burning platform" and "crisis" increasingly used. Since 2000, the prevalence of diabetes has more than doubled. In the next 10 years, both prevalence and direct health-care costs for diabetes are projected to grow by more than 40 per cent. In 2016, an estimated 29 per cent of Canada's population have either diabetes or prediabetes. The prevalence of diabetes in Canada is now slightly higher than in the United States. In fact, Canada has the second highest prevalence rates in recent study of 34 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. This is having a profound impact on the health of millions of Canadians, and costs our health-care system billions of dollars per year. In medical and human terms, the numbers are staggering: Diabetes reduces the average lifespan by five to 15 years. It is estimated that one of 10 deaths in Canadian adults was attributable to diabetes in 2008-2009. People with diabetes are over three times more likely to be hospitalized with cardiovascular disease, 12 times more likely to be hospitalized with end-stage renal disease and over 20 times more likely to be hospitalized for a non-traumatic lower limb amputation compared to the general population. Diabetes contributes to 30 per cent of strokes, 40 per cent of heart attacks, 50 per cent of kidney failure requiring dialysis and 70 per cent of non-traumat Continue reading >>

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