diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Hand Swelling

Diabetes And Your Joints

Diabetes And Your Joints

Diabetes can cause changes in your musculoskeletal system, which is the term for your muscles, bones, joints, ligaments, and tendons. These changes can cause numerous conditions that may affect your fingers, hands, wrists, shoulders, neck, spine, or feet. Symptoms of diabetes-related musculoskeletal problems include muscle pain, joint pain or stiffness, lessened ability to move your joints, joint swelling, deformities, and a “pins and needles” sensation in the arms or legs. Some musculoskeletal problems are unique to diabetes. Others also affect people without diabetes. For instance, diabetes can cause skin changes such as thickening, tightness, or nodules under the skin, particularly in the hands. Carpal tunnel syndrome is frequently seen in people with diabetes, as is trigger finger (a catching or locking of the fingers), although these conditions are commonly seen in people without diabetes, as well. The shoulder joint may also be affected in diabetes. And, of course, the feet are susceptible to problems caused by diabetes. Most of these conditions can be successfully treated with anti-inflammatory medications, steroid injections, or other therapies. It is important to mention any troubling symptoms to your doctor. Ask yourself the following questions, which address some of the more frequent symptoms people have when diabetes affects their muscles, ligaments, tendons, or joints. If you answer “yes” to any, consult your doctor. • Do you have stiffness in your hands that affects your ability to move or use them? • Do your fingers get “locked” in certain positions? • Do you have numbness or tingling in your hands, arms, or legs? • Do you have stiffness or decreased motion in your shoulders? • Do you have muscle pain or swelling? View Abstract Edito Continue reading >>

Swollen Feet, Ankles And Hands - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

Swollen Feet, Ankles And Hands - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

Hello to everyone here. I am a type 1 diabetic (28) who was diagnosed when I was five years old. For the past three days, I have noticed that my ankles and feet, wrists and top of hands swelling considerably. On my feet and ankles the swelling is the worst. I can feel the skin tightening, and my ankles dissappear--they're still there...just buried under puffiness. I am a large but not terribly overweight person, just tall and Nordic (lol). I have seen some commentary about edema, kidney issues, and heart issues associated with this kind of swelling (God forbid it's any of those). I have never had this type of thing happen before (well, unless you count injuries from general clumsiness). My insulin usage has also skyrocketed for some reason. I check my blood sugar and take an active part in my health. My feet are in good condition--no injuries or discoloration, just nice and, er, plump, and rather uncomfortable. I can push my finger into my ankle and make a dent. Ick. Called the doctor...I go in for blood work on Monday (today being Friday)--he's great, but he is a general physician (no responsible endos in Greenville that I can see--that's another issue). Also, I have had hip problems resulting in big pain for about a year now. The swelling seems to happen when I am sitting down or when I am sleeping. What could this indicate? Please try not to be too frightening. I am so grateful that this site exists, and thanks for any help you can give. Oh--Lantus and Humalog are my meds along with Zestril 20mg. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes Basics

Basics of diabetes Diabetes is a condition caused by lack of a chemical in the body (a hormone) called insulin. There are two major forms of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes eventually no insulin is produced and individuals require insulin injections for survival. It used to be thought this only presented in children, but it is now clear this can occur at any age. The other more common form of diabetes called type 2 diabetes occurs due to the body's resistance to the effects of insulin in addition to an insufficient quantity of insulin. However, in this type of diabetes there is usually some insulin produced. For both types of diabetes, blood glucose levels are elevated. Furthermore, people with diabetes are prone to certain complications not seen in those without diabetes. These complications involve the eye (retinopathy), kidney (nephropathy) and nerves (neuropathy). People with diabetes also get early hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), leading to early heart attacks and strokes. The good news for people with diabetes is that with proper care all of these problems can be avoided. Immediate medical attention Uncontrolled diabetes presents with frequent thirst and urination. Over time, patients will become dehydrated as the glucose is "spilling" over into the urine. If insulin deficiency is severe enough, fat stores are used for energy as glucose cannot get into cells. This problem is much more common with type 1 diabetes and is called "ketoacidosis". It can be diagnosed at home with a simple urine test. When significant ketones are found in the urine, it is important to be in touch with a physician immediately. There are other conditions that require immediate attention. Blurry vision in someone with known diabetic eye disease or someone with a long history of di Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Hands

Diabetes And Your Hands

While it’s common knowledge that diabetes involves an elevation of a person’s blood sugar, it is not well known why diabetes can cause stiffness of the hands, shoulders, and other joints and how exactly it plays a role in diseases like trigger finger and Dupuytren’s contracture. Diabetes Stiff Hand Syndrome Diabetes can cause stiffness of the hands in a condition known both as diabetic stiff hand syndrome or diabetic cheiroarthropathy. It is an uncommon condition in which a person’s finger movement becomes decreased and the hands take on a thickened and waxy appearance. As it turns out, people with both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can both get the disorder. People who keep their blood sugars under good control and partake in physical therapy usually can overcome the condition. Diabetes stiff hand syndrome is found in 8 to 50 percent of type 1 diabetic patients. Lesser numbers of type 2 diabetic patients will come down with the disease. The longer a person has diabetes and the worse control of the diabetes the person has, the greater is the chance of getting diabetic cheiroarthropathy. People who have diabetes that results in diabetic neuropathy have a greater chance of having stiff hands when compared to diabetics who don’t have diabetic neuropathy. Common symptoms of diabetic stiff hand syndrome include an inability to move the joints very much, which winds up causing limitations in the function of the hand. Usually the stiffness starts in the smallest fingers of the hands and progresses so that eventually all of the fingers are affected. In the most severe cases, the individual with stiff hand syndrome are unable to clench the hands at all and the fingers stick straight out, unable to hold onto anything with any degree of strength. The skin is also a Continue reading >>

Swollen Hands & Fingers In Diabetic After Running: Causes

Swollen Hands & Fingers In Diabetic After Running: Causes

Hey, you can stop worrying if you’ve been experiencing swollen hands and fingers after running even if you have diabetes. That’s because diabetes does not cause your hands or fingers to swell up as a result of running. Nevertheless, many people do find that after completing their running session, and sometimes during the session, their hands—and especially fingers—have swelled up. This may also occur after hard walking or hiking. What’s going on? “This can happen anytime when you do a sustained activity, even just walking,” says Sheri Colberg, PhD, Professor Emerita, Exercise Science, Old Dominion University, founder of Diabetes Motion, and one of the world’s leading experts on diabetes and exercise. “It just indicates that not all the blood circulating during exercise is being immediately returned to your body core. It’s not a sign of anything bad or unusual.” Isn’t that good news? A new-onset, unexplained symptom in a person with diabetes tends to make them immediately wonder if the symptom is somehow tied to their type 2 or type 1 condition. Many non-diabetics experience the swollen finger phenomenon. The plumpness in your fingers, even though they feel stiff when this happens, is simply the result of extra blood circulation. So feel free to run like the wind! You'll Also Like: Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Hand Swelling?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Hand Swelling?

OK, so first up a great big disclaimer: I am not a doctor. All this information if from a google search so take this as a call to action and go see an actual doctor. Now it may not be diabetes, there are a great many things that can cause swelling. It is likely burst blood vessels caused by high sugar. (diabetes) It could be a side effect of medication. It could be water retention. I don’t actually know. What I do know is that if your hands stay that way you run a real risk of having them amputated after they turn gangrenous and infected. Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

The Musculoskeletal Effects Of Diabetes Mellitus

The Musculoskeletal Effects Of Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-system disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia that has both acute and chronic biochemical and anatomical sequelae, with Type-2 DM representing the most common form of the disease. Neuromusculoskeletal sequelae of DM are common and the practicing chiropractor should be alert to these conditions, as some are manageable in a chiropractic office, while others are life and/or limb threatening. This paper reviews the effects of DM on the musculoskeletal system so as assist the chiropractor in making appropriate clinical decisions regarding therapy, understanding contraindications to therapy, referring patients to medical physicians when appropriate and understanding the impact that DM may have on the prognosis for their patients suffering from the myriad musculoskeletal conditions associated with this disease. Keywords: diabetes, musculoskeletal, chiropractic Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-system disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia that has both acute and chronic biochemical and anatomical sequelae. It is thought to affect almost 17 million Americans, only 11 million of whom have been diagnosed according to the American Diabetes Association. In type 1 diabetes, a lack of insulin results in poor carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. Insulin is functionally absent, typically due to immune-mediated destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas, though other etiologies of beta cell destruction have also been implicated, including drugs, chemicals, viruses, mitochondrial gene defects, pancreatectomy and ionizing radiation.1 Type 1 DM (DM1) occurs most commonly in juveniles. It can occur in adults, especially in those in their late 30s and early 40s. Unlike people with Type 2 DM ( Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Tweet Edema (known as oedema in the UK) is a build up of fluid in the body (water retention) which causes swelling. Edema commonly affects the legs, ankles, feet and wrist. Water retention is often treatable, with treatment varying depending on the cause. Symptoms of edema The main symptom of edema is swelling of the affected area. Other symptoms that may occur, along with swelling, include: Weight gain Aching limbs Stiff joints Discolouration of skin Hypertension (high blood pressure) What causes swelling in the legs, feet and ankles? Swollen ankles and legs will often be brought on, or aggravated, by long periods of standing. A number of medications can increase the risk of oedema. Such medications include corticosteroids, blood pressure medications and the contraceptive pill. Water retention may also be caused by a number of conditions including: A high intake of salt can increase the problems of swelling in people with kidney disease. Treatment for edema Treatment for edema may vary depending on the cause. Water retention may be resolved if the underlying cause can be adequately treated. Regular physical activity and preventing long periods of standing can help reduce water retention. A low dietary salt intake is advisable, particularly if fluid retention has been brought on by kidney disease. If you are overweight, weight loss can help with reducing fluid retention. Diuretics, also known as ‘water tablets’, help to remove fluid from the body and may be prescribed for some causes of oedema. Prevention You can reduce your risk of edema by taking steps to prevent kidney disease and heart failure from developing. This can be achieved through good control of blood glucose levels, regular exercise and a healthy diet. If you can avoid long periods of standing, this wi Continue reading >>

Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

Department of Surgery, Military Hospital, Ambala, India 1Department of Oncosurgery, Army Hospital (RandR), Delhi, India Correspondence toDr. Ashutosh Chauhan, Department of Oncosurgery, Army Hospital (R and R), Delhi Cantt, Delhi - 110010, India. E-mail: [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Tropical diabetic hand syndrome (TDHS) is a terminology used to describe a specific complication affecting patients with diabetes mellitus in the tropics. The syndrome encompasses a localized cellulitis with variable swelling and ulceration of the hands to progressive, fulminant hand sepsis, potentially fatal. Since this syndrome is less recognized it is often under-reported. Authors present two cases of TDHS and emphasize on aggressive glycemic control and surgical therapy to prevent potential crippling or fatal complications. Keywords: Diabetes, gangrene, hand, infection Tropical diabetic hand syndrome (TDHS) is a terminology used to describe a specific acute symptom complex found in diabetic patients in tropics which usually follows minor trauma to the hand, and is associated with a progressive synergistic form of gangrene.[ 1 ] It is both poorly understood by patients and clinicians and severe in consequence without prompt and aggressive treatment. Previous small series or case reports indicate the severe consequences of TDHS, including permanent disability and death.[ 2 , 3 ] We des Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Is Swelling Related To High Blood Sugar?

Is Swelling Related To High Blood Sugar?

Insulin is a hormone that transfers sugar from your blood to your cells. When you have insufficient amounts of insulin -- or your cells are resistant to insulin -- a you may develop high blood sugar. High blood sugar is the predominant characterization of diabetes, but it is also associated with people who have pre-diabetes. High blood sugar can lead to complications of diabetes that include conditions which involve swelling. Video of the Day Swelling, also called edema, is the enlargement of a body tissue, such as skin or an organ. A buildup of fluid in the tissue causes swelling to take place in a local area in several parts throughout your body and leads to rapid weight gain in a short period of time. Common parts of the body that can be affected include the feet, legs, gums, face, blood vessels, joints and glands. Swelling can occur when you eat too much sodium or take diabetes medications called thiazolidinediones. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes characterized by swelling of the lenses of your eyes that is caused by damage to your blood vessels from high levels of blood sugar. Initially, you may not know you have any problems and your eyesight may appear fine. Over time, though, excessive levels of blood sugar in the capillaries that nourish your retina can cause diabetic retinopathy and vision loss. In fact, the higher the levels of blood sugar, the more likely you will damage blood vessels and develop diabetic retinopathy. High blood sugar increases your risk of an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, conditions characterized by blockage of a blood vessel supplying the brain, or bleeding into or around the brain, respectively. High blood sugar can cause more swelling associated with a stroke. Research by scientists at the Seoul Continue reading >>

Oh My Aching Hands: It May Not Be Neuropathy

Oh My Aching Hands: It May Not Be Neuropathy

Arthur Segal had Type 2 diabetes for many years. So when he began to have trouble opening medication bottles and turning door knobs, using a knife and counting his change, he assumed it was neuropathy and that nothing could be done. Most people with diabetes have heard of a condition called diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy takes many forms and its effects vary from person to person. Because of this, treatment is often difficult and outcomes vary depending on the nature of the individual case. However, your pain may not be due to diabetic neuropathy at all. Long-term diabetics with hand pain may actually be suffering from other hand conditions. These two often-overlooked conditions are carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger. According to Dr. Keith Segalman, orthopedic hand surgeon with the Curtis Hand Center at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore, MD, both of these conditions are more prevalent in diabetics than in the general public. Surprisingly, these conditions are not caused by poor circulation, nor are they forms of diabetic neuropathy. In long-term diabetics, advanced glycation end-products, or AGEs, can collect on the tendons in the palms of the hand. The accumulation causes the tendons to thicken, thereby causing nerve compression by pressing on the nerve in the carpal tunnel. This leads to numbness and tingling, similar to neuropathy symptoms, especially when the hands are in certain positions. Many diabetics also find that they have stiffness or restricted movement in one or more fingers. This may be due to trigger finger. Trigger finger results when the thickened tendons can no longer slide easily through the cartilage rings along the fingers. The rubbing causes the tendon to swell even further to the point where the tendon can no longer slide thr Continue reading >>

More in diabetes