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Diabetes Graph 2016

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Overweight & Obesity Statistics

Overweight & Obesity Statistics

This content describes the prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States. Defining Overweight and Obesity A person whose weight is higher than what is considered as a normal weight adjusted for height is described as being overweight or having obesity.1 Fast Facts According to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2013–20142,3,4,5 More than 1 in 3 adults were considered to be overweight. More than 2 in 3 adults were considered to be overweight or have obesity. More than 1 in 3 adults were considered to have obesity. About 1 in 13 adults were considered to have extreme obesity. About 1 in 6 children and adolescents ages 2 to 19 were considered to have obesity. Using Body Mass Index (BMI) to Estimate Overweight and Obesity BMI is the tool most commonly used to estimate and screen for overweight and obesity in adults and children. BMI is defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared. For most people, BMI is related to the amount of fat in their bodies, which can raise the risk of many health problems. A health care professional can determine if a person’s health may be at risk because of his or her weight. The tables below show BMI ranges for overweight and obesity. Adults An online tool for gauging the BMIs of adults can be found at: Children and Adolescents BMI of Children and Adolescents Ages 2 to 19 BMI Classification At or above the 85th percentile on the CDC growth charts Overweight or obesity At or above the 95th percentile on the CDC growth charts Obesity (including extreme obesity) At or above 120 percent of the 95th percentile on the CDC growth charts Extreme obesity Children grow at different rates at different times, so it is not always easy to tell if a child is overweight. The CDC BMI gro Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Annual Product Reference Charts

Diabetes Health Annual Product Reference Charts

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website. I think that it’s safe to say that none of us were happy when we first found out that we had diabetes. The words “you’re a diabetic” or “you have diabetes” can sound like a death sentence and while we … Dear Nadia, Is marijuana used to lower high blood sugar? if so, does this mean I have to refrain from the munchies to get the benefits? Leah Dear Leah: The new Marijuana industry is still at its infancy in terms … Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

Diabetes By The Numbers: Facts, Statistics, And You

Diabetes By The Numbers: Facts, Statistics, And You

Insulin acts as a “key.” It allows the glucose to go from the blood into the cells. It also helps you store energy. Insulin is a vital part of metabolism. Without it, your body isn’t able to function or perform properly. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to serious complications. It can cause damage to small and large blood vessels and organs. This can often lead to heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, and eye disease. Managing diabetes requires keeping track of blood glucose levels. Treatment may include taking insulin or other medications. Healthy eating habits and regular exercise can also help manage diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are different types of diabetes. Each has something to do with insulin and blood glucose. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is a disorder in which the pancreas cannot longer produce insulin. It used to be called juvenile diabetes. It’s also sometimes called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. There is no cure. If you have it, you must take insulin to survive. Type 2 diabetes In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, at least initially. But the body doesn’t respond to it or use it effectively. This is called insulin resistance. Over time, the ability of the pancreas to make insulin decreases. Then blood sugars go up. Some, but not all people with type 2 diabetes need to take insulin. Most of the time a proper diet, exercise, and medications can manage the disease. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), women with gestational diabetes have a 35 to 60 percent chance of developing type 2 diabetes within 20 years. Prediabetes When blood glucose levels are higher than they should be, but no Continue reading >>

Daily Chartdiabetes Is No Longer A Rich-world Disease

Daily Chartdiabetes Is No Longer A Rich-world Disease

EVERY six seconds a person somewhere in the world dies as a consequence of diabetes, according to estimates by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). In 2015 5m lives were lost to the disease, more than were claimed by AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. Moreover, the toll is rising faster than forecasters have expected. Nearly half of these deaths are among people younger than 60. In parts of Africa, where the condition is much less likely to be diagnosed, that share is more than four-fifths. The rise of diabetes has been misjudged repeatedly. In 1995 the World Health Organisation estimated that 135m 20- to 79-year-olds had diabetes, and that this figure would more than double in three decades. But reality outpaced this stark projection by a huge margin: just twelve years later the number of people with diabetes had already nearly doubled. Since then, the rise of diabetes has been so steep that prevalence closed in on projections even faster. In 2015, the estimated global prevalence had reached 8.8%, nearly double that in 1995. By 2040, the IDF reckons that a tenth of humanity will have the condition. Already, diabetes gobbles up 12% of health spending globally; in some countries, the share is as much as a fifth. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing rapidly. The factors contributing to type 2 are well known; poor diets, urbanisation and low physical activity increase susceptibility. It is no surprise that type 2 accounts for 90% of cases in high-income countries. But type 1 diabetes, which is fatal unless treated with daily insulin medication, is also rising at about 3% a year. The reasons are unclear, but the data leave no doubt that diabetes is no longer exclusively a rich-world disease. Continue reading >>

About Agp - The Single Page Report For Everyone

About Agp - The Single Page Report For Everyone

The Ambulatory Glucose Report (AGP) is a standardized, single page glucose and insulin report. It includes summary statistics, a glucose profile graph and an insulin profile graph or glucose daily calendar graphs. Just like an EKG, the AGP offers a report that is consistent regardless of device. No more searching for the numbers, printing pages of reports, or different reports for each patient and separate device. Graphs help translate the numbers into a picture for easy, quick interpretation. Using a single report leaves more visit time for shared decision-making discussions. The AGP report helps patients, families and clinicians use the data. * Please click on the image above to view detailed report "It is organized and easy to understand."-Patient History of the AGP 2017 Dexcom licensed the AGP International Diabetes Center (IDC) receives first AGP patent for CGM design, other patents pending AACE endorses AGP 2016 International Diabetes Center (IDC) released AGP v3.2 for SMBG, CGM, Pump + CGM Glooko licensed the AGP Abbott released in their FreeStyle Libre CGM with AGP graph in the U.S. 2015 Diasend was the first diabetes data aggregator software company to license AGP Roche Diabetes Care licensed AGP 2014 Abbott released the first device with an AGP graph in Europe, the FreeStyle Libre CGM Drs. Mullen and Bergenstal began a study of the AGP in patient clinics funded by the Helmsley Charitable Trust. This study found that patients, families and clinicians prefer the AGP over other reports and find it to be more useful; a standard download process creating AGP reports could save 4-19 minutes per patient visit. 2013 Consensus view SMBG and CGM Reports, built from expert panel suggestions, were published in the two leading diabetes technology journals. The AGP report n Continue reading >>

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

A blood sugar or blood glucose chart identifies ideal blood sugar levels throughout the day, including before and after meals. Doctors use blood sugar charts to set target goals and monitor diabetes treatment plans. Blood sugar charts also help those with diabetes assess and self-monitor blood sugar test results. What is a blood sugar chart? Blood sugar charts act as a reference guide for blood sugar test results. As such, blood sugar charts are important tools for diabetes management. Most diabetes treatment plans involve keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal or target goals as possible. This requires frequent at-home and doctor-ordered testing, along with an understanding of how results compare to target levels. To help interpret and assess blood sugar results, the charts outline normal and abnormal blood sugar levels for those with and without diabetes. In the United States, blood sugar charts typically report sugar levels in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). In the United Kingdom and many other countries, blood sugar is reported in millimoles per liter (mmol/L). A1C blood sugar recommendations are frequently included in blood sugar charts. A1C results are often described as both a percentage and an average blood sugar level in mg/dL. An A1C test measures the average sugar levels over a 3-month period, which gives a wider insight into a person's overall management of their blood sugar levels. Blood sugar chart guidelines Appropriate blood sugar levels vary throughout the day and from person to person. Blood sugars are often lowest before breakfast and in the lead up to meals. Blood sugars are often highest in the hours following meals. People with diabetes will often have higher blood sugar targets or acceptable ranges than those without the condition. These Continue reading >>

Percentage Of Diabetics In The Global Adult Population In 2017 And 2045

Percentage Of Diabetics In The Global Adult Population In 2017 And 2045

Premium Statistics on "Diabetes" Related Studies: Available to Download in PDF or PPTX Format Everything On "Diabetes" in One Document: Edited and Divided into Handy Chapters. Including Detailed References. Statista for Your Company: The Research and Analysis Tool Further Content: Statistics, Studies, and Topic Pages Our Business Solutions: Save Time and Money * All products require an annual contract. Prices do not include sales tax (New York residents only). Continue reading >>

How Has Diabetes Care In The U.s. Changed Over Time?

How Has Diabetes Care In The U.s. Changed Over Time?

This collection of charts and a related brief explore trends in health outcomes, quality of care, and treatment costs for people with diabetes and related endocrine disorders. Endocrine diseases occur when any of the eight major glands in the endocrine system produce too little or too much of a particular hormone. In the U.S., diabetes is the most common endocrine disease. Diabetes is caused when the body is unable to create enough insulin to break down blood sugar. It is among the 10 leading causes of death in the U.S. and can cause serious health complications such as early mortality, blindness, kidney failure, lower-extremity amputations, and heart disease. There has been a reduction in complications due to diabetes and improvement in disease management, but diagnosis rates and spending continue to grow. Diabetes is among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States Diabetes is an endocrine system disease caused when the body is unable to create enough insulin to break down blood sugar. It is among the 10 leading causes of death in the U.S. and can cause serious health complications such as early mortality, blindness, kidney failure, lower-extremity amputations, and heart disease. There are three types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually diagnosed in children and young adults when the body does not produce insulin. There is no way to prevent type 1 diabetes, and proper management includes daily injections of insulin and monitoring blood glucose levels. Gestational diabetes occurs when there is not enough insulin created to support the pregnancy and happens in about 9.2% of pregnancies according to an analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A diagnosis of gesta Continue reading >>

Emerging Treatments For Post-transplantation Diabetes Mellitus

Emerging Treatments For Post-transplantation Diabetes Mellitus

Emerging treatments for post-transplantation diabetes mellitus Trond Jenssen is a Consultant of Nephrology in the Department of Transplant Medicine at Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, and a Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Troms, Norway. He obtained his PhD in internal medicine in 1986, and specialized in kidney diseases in 1992. He has authored and co-authored more than 220 publications in peer reviewed journals. He is the medical advisor of the Norwegian Diabetes Association, and his main research interests are kidney transplantation and diabetes, pancreas transplantation, and cardiovascular risk in renal disease. Anders Hartmann is a Professor of Nephrology at the University of Oslo, Norway. He is also a Consultant in Nephrology in the Department of Transplant Medicine at Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet. Professor Hartmann obtained his PhD in 1987 and specialized in internal medicine and kidney diseases in 1990. He has authored or co-authored more than 250 publications in peer reviewed journals. His main interest of research is related to kidney transplantation and its complications, particularly metabolic and cardiovascular complications. Nature Reviews Nephrology volume 11, pages 465477 (2015) Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM), also known as new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM), occurs in 1015% of renal transplant recipients and is associated with cardiovascular disease and reduced lifespan. In the majority of cases, PTDM is characterized by -cell dysfunction, as well as reduced insulin sensitivity in liver, muscle and adipose tissue. Glucose-lowering therapy must be compatible with immunosuppressant agents, reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and severe arteriosclerosis. Such therapy should not place the patient Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Statistics For The United States

Kidney Disease Statistics For The United States

About Kidney Disease A diagnosis of kidney disease means that a person’s kidneys are damaged and cannot filter blood the way they should. This damage can cause wastes to build up in the body. Kidney disease can cause other health problems, such as heart disease. If you have kidney disease, it increases your chances of having a stroke or heart attack. Major risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, and family history of kidney failure. Unless otherwise noted, data are from the United States Renal Data Service 2015 Annual Data Report. Glossary Acute Kidney Injury (AKI): Sudden and temporary loss of kidney function. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD): Any condition that causes reduced kidney function over a period of time. Chronic kidney disease may develop over many years and lead to end-stage kidney (or renal) disease (ESRD). The five stages of CKD are: Stage 1: Kidney damage with normal kidney function (estimated GFR ≥90 mL/min per 1.73 m2) and persistent (≥3 months) proteinuria. Stage 2: Kidney damage with mild loss of kidney function (estimated GFR 60-89 mL/min per 1.73 m2) and persistent (≥3 months) proteinuria. Stage 3: Mild-to-severe loss of kidney function (estimated GFR 30-59 mL/min per 1.73 m2). Stage 4: Severe loss of kidney function (estimated GFR 15-29 mL/min per 1.73 m2). Stage 5: Kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplant for survival. Also known as ESRD (estimated GFR <15 mL/min per 1.73 m2). Dialysis: Treatment to filter wastes and water from the blood. When their kidneys fail, people need dialysis to filter their blood artificially. The two main forms of dialysis are hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD): Total and permanent kidney failure treated with a kidney transplant or dialysis. Glo Continue reading >>

How Many Australians Have Diabetes?

How Many Australians Have Diabetes?

An estimated 1.2 million (6%) Australian adults aged 18 years and over had diabetes in 2014–15, based on self-reported data, from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2014–15 National Health Survey. This includes people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and type unknown but excludes gestational diabetes. Information based on self-reported data only is likely to underestimate the prevalence of diabetes as it cannot include people with undiagnosed diabetes. The ABS 2011–12 Australian Health Survey, which included both measured and self-report data showed that for every 4 adults with diagnosed diabetes, there was 1 who was undiagnosed. The prevalence of diabetes (based on self-reported data) has tripled between 1989–90 and 2014–15. The proportion of people with diabetes has increased from 1.5% to 4.7%. Age and sex In 2014–15, the prevalence of diabetes among adults (based on self-reported data): Was higher for men (7%) than women (5%). Increased rapidly up to age 75, with rates among 65–74 year-olds (17%) 3 times as high as for 45–54 year-olds (5%) and 1.4 times as high as for 55–64 year olds (12%) (Figure 1). Figure 1: Prevalence of diabetes, among persons aged 18 and over, by age and sex, 2014–15 Source: AIHW analysis of ABS Microdata: National Health Survey (NHS), 2014–15 (Data tables). In 2014–15, the prevalence of diabetes (based on self-reported data) among adults was similar by remoteness and varied by socioeconomic disadvantage (Figure 2). Proportions were: Similar between Major cities (6%), Inner regional (7%) and Outer regional and remote areas (7%). Around twice as high in the lowest socioeconomic group (10% and 7% for men and women, respectively) as those in the highest socioeconomic group (4% each for men and women). Figure 2: Continue reading >>

The Promising State Of Diabetes Technology In 2016

The Promising State Of Diabetes Technology In 2016

I've been a Type 1 Diabetic now for nearly 25 years. The first thing that every techie does once they've been diagnosed with Diabetes is they try to solve the problem with software or hardware. Whatever tool they have, they use that too to "solve their Diabetes." Sometimes it's Excel, sometimes it's writing a whole new system. We can't help ourselves. We see the charts and graphs, we start to understand that this is a solvable problem. However, innovation in Diabetes technology has two sides. There's the "what can we do within the medical establishment" side, and there's the "what components do I, the actual diabetic, have to work with" side. We are given insulin pumps, glucose meters, and drugs but we aren't involved in the development, which makes sense to a point. Fifteen years ago (yes, really, 15) I went on a trip with a PalmPilot, OmniSky wireless modem, Blood sugar meter, and insulin pump and quasi-continuously sent my blood glucose numbers back to a server and my doctor. Many many years later I demonstrated on stage at a Microsoft conference (video) how a remote management system like NightScout along with other innovations in IoT are taking these concepts so much further. It's through the work of hundreds of innovators and tinkerers that I think we're on the cusp. Aside: If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Type 1 Diabetes works, please take a moment and read Diabetes Explanation: The Airplane Analogy. This post pretty clearly explains how blood sugar rises and falls and why fixing this isn't a simple problem. Four years ago - four years ago this week in fact - I wrote a post called The Sad State of Diabetes Technology in 2012, largely in frustration. It became one of my most popular posts. For some it was a turning point and was called "seminal." For most Dia Continue reading >>

Dexcom G5: Not Just A Matter Of Convenience

Dexcom G5: Not Just A Matter Of Convenience

by Gary Scheiner MS, CDE Dexcom’s recent release of their G5 system introduces a number of opportunities and a few challenges for people with diabetes, as well as those who care for and treat them. G5, for those who don’t know, is the same as Dexcom’s previous G4 but without the need for a receiver: The transmitter emits a bluetooth signal that is picked up by a cell phone, and an application installed on the phone displays the data and emits alerts and warnings. To be honest, not all that much has changed. The sensors are the same. The accuracy is the same. The trendgraph displays and alert settings are the same. Calibrations are still required a few times a day, and a “share” option exists for those wanting others to “follow” their data. Sure, it’s nice not having to schlep around a separate receiver to display the Dexcom CGM info, although G5 does come with a receiver for those who choose to use it in addition to or instead of the cellphone app. Having used G5 for a couple of months now (Dexcom sent me a pre-release version to study), I have found a number of advantages and disadvantages to the new system: Dexcom G5 PROS No receiver to misplace or lose. I’m much less likely to lose my cell phone than a CGM receiver. I used to pay my kids $5 to find my lost Dexcom receiver, which happened regularly. Then someone suggested they might be hiding it on purpose just to make 5 bucks. The trendgraph screens allow you to scroll your finger over the graph and see the individual BG values and event entries. Instead of the usual boring alert beeps, the system allows you to choose from 22 different types of tones for each type of alert… including the sound of a baby crying, a police siren, or a dance beat. Fun! The trendgraph display is considerably larger (ab Continue reading >>

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