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Diabetes Gall Bladder

​for Your Gallbladder’s Sake, Control Diabetes!

​for Your Gallbladder’s Sake, Control Diabetes!

A Basic Guide to Diabetes, it’s Relationship with the Gallbladder, and Natural Ways to Control Diabetes the Gallbladder-friendly Way There is nothing sweet about diabetes; in fact, some refer to it as a “silent killer”. Not only can this pandemic make a patient suffer and deteriorate slowly, it can also drain the whole family of financial resources due to health care costs that may have to be borne for a long period of time. Diabetes also has a long list of related disorders and complications, so once you have it, you can never be too complacent that everything is under control. For example, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and amputation in the United States. The risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is much higher for diabetics. It also impacts numerous bodily systems –nervous, digestive, urinary, and the biliary system which includes the gallbladder. According to 2015 statistics, there are about 30.3 million Americans suffering from the disease. This makes diabetes the 7th leading cause of death in the country. Diabetes, commonly referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a metabolism disorder which affects the way our body maintains and manages glucose or sugar. This compound serves as our principal source of “fuel”. A hormone called insulin is crucial for the conversion of glucose into energy. Sadly in diabetics, insulin production is either absent or inadequate. It is also possible that the body’s cells are no longer responding properly to the hormone. Therefore, glucose remains in the blood instead of being used up as energy, thus the high blood sugar levels. There are three major types of diabetes – type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. The first type is also called insulin-dependent diabetes because people with type 1 do not have the Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Diet For Diabetes

Gallbladder Diet For Diabetes

If you are diabetic, eating the right diet to control gallbladder problems does not have to be difficult—especially if you are already eating healthy. As you continue to control intake of sugar and carbohydrates, you'll need to turn your attention to the kinds of fats you are eating. Gallbladder Issues The gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped pouch located under your liver that stores bile and releases it into your intestine to promote digestion. Bile consists of cholesterol, lecithin, bile salts and pigments, all of which are produced by the liver. Risk factors for developing gallstones include genetics and gender, as women are twice as likely as men to suffer from them, as well as being overweight. Gallstones can trigger symptoms such as abdominal pain, gas, nausea, bloating and vomiting. If symptoms persist, gallbladder removal may be recommended. However, many people develop gallstones without having any symptoms. While 20 percent of people over the age of 65 develop gallstones, only about 4 percent suffer any symptoms. To avoid gallstones, doctors recommend a diet low in fat and cholesterol and high in fiber, with a moderate intake of calories. Diabetes and Gallbladder Diet To control diabetes, most doctors recommend consuming plenty of fruits and vegetables, high-fiber foods, reduced fat and sugar consumption, and eating smaller portions. The same applies to a gallbladder diet, with more focus on reduced consumption of fats. For instance, you'll need to switch to low-fat butter or margarine, low-fat salad dressings and low-fat cheeses. As for diabetics, recommended foods for gallbladder problems include fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains such as oats, bran cereal and brown rice, and low-fat dairy products. Poultry, fish and lean meat are also recommended. Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Problems And Diabetes

Gallbladder Problems And Diabetes

For reasons that aren’t fully understood, people with diabetes have more gallstone problems than people in the general population. Diabetes and Gallbladder Problems: What’s the Connection? The evidence that people with diabetes are at greater risk of gallstones is clear, but “we still don’t know why,” says Armand A. Krikorian, MD, an endocrinologist at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and an assistant professor of medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland. Perhaps it’s because people with diabetes are generally overweight, and obesity is linked to gallstone disease. People with diabetes have higher levels of triglycerides — a type of fat — and it’s theorized that the triglycerides themselves encourage gallstone formation. Another theory is that stones form because of what is called autonomic neuropathy, or damage from diabetes to the involuntary nerves that control movement of the bowels and gallbladder. According to this line of thought, the bile stored in the gallbladder is not released efficiently because the nerves are damaged, and gallstones form from the resulting sludge. Also, recent research on insulin-resistant mice shows that FOXO1, a specific protein involved with diabetes, increases the amount of cholesterol that enters the bile, which may lead to the formation of gallstones. Cholesterol is a major component of most gallstones. Diabetes and Gallbladder Problems: Know the Symptoms Dr. Krikorian says that for a person living with diabetes, controlling the diabetes is the way to head off gallbladder problems. When diabetes is under control, it's much less likely that autonomic neuropathy will become an issue, and your triglyceride levels will be lower — thus decreasing your odds of developing gallsto Continue reading >>

Joslin Study Finds Insulin Resistance Causes Gallstones

Joslin Study Finds Insulin Resistance Causes Gallstones

News Release BOSTON – July 22, 2008 – It has been known for more than 100 years that gallstones are more common in obese individuals. Now, researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center have determined that insulin resistance is likely the reason why. “This is a very exciting discovery not only because we now have an answer to something that has been a puzzle for more than a century, but also because of its potential therapeutic implications,” said lead author Sudha Biddinger, M.D., Ph.D., a researcher in the Joslin Section on Obesity and Hormone Action. The research, which is published in the current issue of Nature Medicine, demonstrates a link between insulin resistance and the development of gallstones in mice that lacked insulin receptors in their livers. “Obesity is associated with increased secretion of cholesterol into the bile. The excess cholesterol accumulates in the gallbladder, which can lead to the formation of painful gallstones,” said Biddinger. “This study shows that insulin resistance is key to this process, as the lack of insulin receptors in the liver was sufficient to promote gallstones in that group of mice.” In the study, mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet for one week. Thirty-six percent of the insulin resistant mice developed gallstones, compared to none in the control group. According to the paper, a regulatory protein involved in diabetes called FOXO1 is the cause. “FOXO1 is regulated by insulin, so when there is insufficient insulin, FOXO1 is turned on,” Biddinger explained. “This causes the liver to produce glucose, which leads to diabetes. This study demonstrates that FOXO1 also increases cholesterol secretion into the bile, leading to gallstones.” Gallstones are part of the metabolic syndrome, a collection of symptoms Continue reading >>

Gallstone Disease And The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Gallstone Disease And The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Gallstone Disease and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Scientific Reportsvolume7, Articlenumber:15853 (2017) Gallstone disease (GSD) is related to several diabetes risk factors. The present study was to examine whether GSD was independently associated with type 2 diabetes in the China Kadoorie Biobank study. After excluding participants with prevalent diabetes and prior histories of cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline, 189,154 men and 272,059 women aged 3079 years were eligible for analysis. The baseline prevalence of GSD was 5.7% of the included participants. During 4,138,687 person-years of follow-up (median, 9.1 years), a total of 4,735 men and 7,747 women were documented with incident type 2 diabetes. Compared with participants without GSD at baseline, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for type 2 diabetes for those with GSD were 1.09 (95% CI: 0.961.24; P = 0.206), 1.21 (95% CI: 1.13-1.30; P < 0.001), and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.10-1.25; P < 0.001) in men, women, and the whole cohort respectively. There was no statistically significant heterogeneity between men and women (P = 0.347 for interaction). The association between GSD and type 2 diabetes was strongest among participants who reported 5 years since the first diagnosis and were still on treatment at baseline (HR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.16-1.88; P = 0.001). The present study highlights the importance of developing a novel prevention strategy to mitigate type 2 diabetes through improvement of gastrointestinal health. Type 2 diabetes has become epidemic worldwide 1 . In China, a rapid increase in diabetes incidence was observed in recent decades, with a prevalence of 11.6% in 2010 2 . Gallstone disease (GSD) remains a common gastrointestinal disorder in both developed countries 3 and Asian populations such as Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Diabetes, Gallstones And Kidney Stones

What You Need To Know About Diabetes, Gallstones And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones and gallstones both occur more frequently in people with diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which causes insulin resistance. Kidney Stones and Type 2 Diabetes Kidney stones or nephrolithiasis are small pebble-like pieces of material that form in one or both of your kidneys from minerals in the urine. While most kidney stones exit the body without the help of a doctor, some stones get caught in the urinary tract where they can block the flow of urine and cause great pain. Kidney stones come in several types. The most common are uric acid stones, calcium oxalate stones, and infectious stones. People with diabetes or metabolic syndrome are particularly susceptible to developing uric acid kidney stones. Causes & Symptoms One reason why people with diabetes have a higher chance of having a kidney stone is that they often have highly-acidic urine, which puts them at risk for developing uric acid stones. Behind this acidic urine is poorly controlled diabetes. “When the body doesn’t have enough sugar for metabolism because either it isn’t producing insulin or not responding to insulin it’s forced to metabolize fat and that can make your urine acidotic,” says Phillip Mucksavage, MD, director of endourology and stone disease at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. “This condition, called ketoacidosis, can change levels of the pH in urine.” Diabetes patients also have more calcium oxalate stones than the general population. Once again, uncontrolled diabetes is the culprit. “Uncontrolled diabetes can cause dehydration which is a prime risk factor for calcium oxalate stones,” says Dr. Mucksavage. Other diseases such as high blood pressure and obesity may also increase the risk of developing kidney stones. About 10% of people with kidney stones never k Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Surgery And Type 1 Diabetes

Gallbladder Surgery And Type 1 Diabetes

As many of you know, I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes as an adult. I have only been a Type 1, insulin pump wearing, cgm stylin', diabetic for just over a year. Anyway, about 4 days ago, I started having terrible pain in my upper stomach that was radiating to my chest. I seriously thought I was having a heart attack. On Sunday, I decided it was time to go to the ER. They did an ultrasound and said I have gallstones and need my gallbladder out. Has anyone else dealt with gallbladder surgery as a type 1 diabetic? What kind of surgery did you have? If you had laproscopic did they make you stay overnight since you were diabetic? If you are on a pump, how was your diabetes managed? Please help! I see the surgeon today at 11:30. (Today is my birthday by the way....Happy Birthday....you're gallbladder needs removed!) Any tips, advice, and information would be so greatly appreciated!!! And please read the wonderful TuDs Emily Coles discussion/reply dated January 15th 2014 titled "Hospital care for T1s: It aint pretty. Get your endo team involved as well. What hospital affiliation do they have, is the surgery going to be at that hospital? Will they help manage your D care and interact with the anesthesiologist? A lot has to do with hospital policy on pumps CGMs etc but getting your D team as an active participant if surgery is needed can be huge. I got my T1 diagnosis a number of years after having my gallbladder removed, so I can't help with any questions on how to manage BG with surgery. Will leave others to give you advice on that. As far as gallbladder surgery itself, it's usually done via laproscopy and is outpatient. It's much better to elect to have it done when you're feeling well (vs when you're in the middle of an attack and everything is inflamed.) My hospital roo Continue reading >>

Presence Of Gallstones Or Kidney Stones And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Presence Of Gallstones Or Kidney Stones And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Recent evidence suggests that gallstones and kidney stones are associated with insulin resistance, but the relation between stone diseases and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus is not clear. Participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study (Potsdam, Germany) provided information about the presence of gallstones and kidney stones at recruitment between 1994 and 1998. On biennial questionnaires, participants reported newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus, and confirmation was obtained from treating physicians. During a mean follow-up period of 7.0 years between 1994 and 2005, 849 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were identified among 25,166 participants. After adjustment for sex, age, waist circumference, and lifestyle risk factors, persons with reported gallstones (n = 3,293) had an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (relative risk = 1.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.21, 1.68). Among the 23,817 participants with information on reported kidney stones (784 cases of incident diabetes), those who developed kidney stones (n = 2,468) were not at increased risk of diabetes in multivariable-adjusted models (relative risk = 1.05, 95% confidence interval: 0.86, 1.27). These findings suggest that gallstones, but not kidney stones, may predict the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, providing physicians with an interventional opportunity to implement adequate prevention measures. Thyroid disease is common, and evidence of an association between organochlorine exposure and thyroid disease is increasing. The authors examined the cross-sectional association between ever use of organochlorines and risk of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism among female spouses (n = 16,529) in Iowa and North Carolina enrolled in the Agr Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetic Patients For Gallstones

Treating Diabetic Patients For Gallstones

TREATING DIABETIC PATIENTS FOR GALLSTONES TREATING DIABETIC PATIENTS FOR GALLSTONES Should most asymptomatic gallstones in otherwise healthy diabetic patients be treated with elective cholecystectomy? Robert E. Hollis Jr, MD, Fort Mitchell, Ky. Gallstones are more common in diabetic patients than in others, and there is some largely anecdotal evidence that diabetics are at increased risk for developing severe gangrenous cholecystitis. This information led some authorities in the 1980s to recommend prophylactic cholecystectomy for asymptomatic patients. However, the risk of gangrenous cholecystitis is small and probably doesnt outweigh the risks and costs associated with surgery. One study, for example, showed that of 47 diabetic patients found to have asymptomatic gallstones, only 14% went on to have symptoms or complications from cholelithiasis at five years (Dig Dis Sci. 1994;39:1704-1707), similar to data from the general population. Consequently, most authorities no longer recommend prophylactic cholecystectomy for asymptomatic diabetic patients. Continue reading >>

Gall Bladder Surgery And Diabetes

Gall Bladder Surgery And Diabetes

I'm scheduled to enter the hospital on Monday (Mar. 1) for testing prior to having my gall bladder removed on Mar. 2. I guess I was misinformed about life after gall bladder removal! I thought that I would be able to eat almost everything without tummy problems. Apparently this isn't the case! In addition to no spicy foods (I LOVE spicy foods, within limits), it seems I won't be able to eat cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower as well! That's crazy! Those are great veggies!! What I just read in my browser is that I won't be able to eat much of what I like. In addition to all of this, I'm wondering if there's another way especially since I'm also a diabetic! I feel pretty good right now, although two weeks ago, i was having some problems; pain, bloating, indigestion. After 10 days of antibiotics and a very careful diet, I feel great now. How does gall bladder removal affect a diabetic? If i just control my diet and eat really good stuff, like I have been during the last month or so, can I avoid having surgery?? I'd do just about ANYTHING to avoid surgery!! [FONT="Georgia"][COLOR="RoyalBlue"]Arlene Meds:Humalog Mix50 - 50 units 1X before breakfast D.D. Family Getting much harder to control First off dont believe all you read on the net. I have all that stuff and had mine out about 3 yrs ago. The first month maybe I had to back off a bit but believe me I have the hottest chili, all the foods you listed and I have no issues at all on that. It also depends on how bad your gallbladder is before you need to have it out, mine was extreme pain and my wife was throwing up daily ours had to come out we could not stand it. Yes we changed our diet to avoid all those things, still needed it out but good luck whatever route you take. Hi...thanks for this. They told me 15 years ago that it Continue reading >>

A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

Gallbladder problems occur fairly frequently in people with diabetes, so if you're a diabetic and you've recently had your gallbladder removed, you're not alone. While you tried to cope with your diseased gallbladder before your surgery, you probably needed to cut back on fat in your diet to minimize symptoms. After gallbladder removal surgery -- known in medical parlance as cholecystectomy -- your doctor may tell you to gradually return to your previous diet, perhaps with an emphasis on certain nutrient groups. However, because you have diabetes, you'll need to continue to carefully watch what you eat. Fortunately, the diet for gallbladder removal patients and the diet recommended for diabetics contain many of the same elements. Video of the Day Following your gallbladder removal surgery, you may find you have difficulty digesting meals that contain a lot of fat. That's because your gallbladder's primary function was to help you process fats. You may experience diarrhea following meals, especially particularly fatty ones. So, steer clear of fried foods to prevent digestive problems, and skip fatty sauces and gravies, as they contain too much fat. Because you're diabetic, stick with healthier fats in small quantities. For example, choose olive oil instead of butter for stir fries, and consider having fish for dinner instead of meat, because fish contains healthy fats known as omega-3 fatty acids. Limit your fat at each meal to 3 grams or less to avoid digestive problems. You may know that a high-fiber diet can help you manage your diabetes by stabilizing and normalizing your blood sugar levels. In addition, getting plenty of fiber may help your digestive system normalize your bowel movements following gallbladder removal surgery, reducing the incidence of diarrhea and c Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Diet For Diabetes

Gallbladder Diet For Diabetes

If you are suffering from diabetes, then adhering to proper diet to control your gallbladder problems should not be difficult. This is especially so if you are already leading a healthy lifestyle. As you go on with your intake of carbohydrates and sugar, you will need to also turn your attention to the type of fats that you consume. Gallbladder, as you know, is a small and pear-shaped pouch located right below your liver. It stores bile and releases it into your intestine to ensure proper digestion. Your bile consists of lecithin, cholesterol, pigments and bile salts, which are produced in by your liver. The risk factors for developing gallstones are gender and genetics. Women are twice as likely as men to suffer from gallstones, especially those who are overweight. Gallstones can lead to symptoms like abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, gas and vomiting. If symptoms persist, gallbladder removal might be an option. However, many who develop gallstones do not show any symptoms at all. Although 20 percent of those aged 65 and above develop gallstones but only around 4 percent of them suffer from the symptoms. In order to avoid gallstones, doctors recommend a diet that is low in fat and cholesterol but high in fiber and moderate intake of calories. In order to control diabetes, many doctors recommend consuming lots of fruits and vegetables and other foods that are high in fiber. They also recommend avoiding consumption of fats and sugar, or otherwise consumed in limited portions. The same goes for a gallbladder diet, but with more emphasis on the reduced fat consumption. For instance, you may need to switch to low fat margarine or butter, low fat cheeses and low fat salad dressings. As for those who are suffering from diabetes, the recommended foods to avoid gallbladder pro Continue reading >>

Can Type 2 Be Caused By Pancreatic/gall Bladder Probs?

Can Type 2 Be Caused By Pancreatic/gall Bladder Probs?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can Type 2 be caused by Pancreatic/gall bladder probs? Asking as awaiting scan for gall bladder stones/inflamed pancreas after visit to doc's earlier this week & needing more blood tests as results on last weeks not right for some reason @ferret22 - Damage to the pancreas can cause diabetes, but I think it would be Type 3c in that case. Was diagnosed type 2 in Nov. after ending up in hospital with TIA & diabetes symptoms mistaken for Menopause/wrong diagnosis for 3 years. I thought the occasional tummy pain IBS flare up or tummy bug or poss Kidney problem but No, Had quite a few short 1-2 days episodes with these symptoms for a few years but never went to doc's as by the time I got an appointment symptoms gone @ferret22 - Damage to the pancreas can cause diabetes, but I think it would be Type 3c in that case. sorry this is so belated but I've only just seen it. My type 2 diabetes was caused by damage to my pancreas resulting from keyhole gall bladder removal surgery that was more serious than had been anticipated. Most folk in UK have type 2 diabetes, about 5% or less have type 1 diabetes; but there is also what one might call secondary diabetes, diabetes secondary to other things; the two commonest other things would be pancreatic damage, generally from pancreatitis, or drugs, such as steroids. Probably best not to go too deeply into the classification of diabetes - one could look at the ADA or NDDG or WHO or IDF publications; but if one considers the above three, and gestational diabetes, one just about includes all diabetic folk. But we are getting better at considering the factors upsetting glucose handling such as insulin resistance, and lack of Continue reading >>

Infection Of The Gall Bladder And Diabetes

Infection Of The Gall Bladder And Diabetes

Summary Since the proper understanding of the relationship between gall bladder infections and diabetes is an important one from the standpoint of the management of such patients, this presentation is offered with the hope of throwing added light on the subject. Detailed observations on twenty-two patients, most of them over a prolonged period of years, have been furnished to show that there is considerable variation in the effects of cholecystic disease on carbohydrate metabolism in different individuals. However, it seems obvious that any disturbance or impairment of liver function as indicated by decreased glucose tolerance represents a definite threat that ultimately the patient may become diabetic. Removal of an infected gall bladder often improves the carbohydrate metabolism in such cases, but it does not always insure that this improvement will be permanent. Continue reading >>

Management Of Gallstones In Diabetic Patients

Management Of Gallstones In Diabetic Patients

The management of gallstones in diabetic patients has traditionally been considered problematic. Autopsy findings and uncontrolled studies have documented a higher prevalence of cholelithiasis in diabetics, and early reports showed dramatically increased perioperative morbidity and mortality for treatment of diabetics with acute cholecystitis. As a result, some authorities have recommended prophylactic cholecystectomy for diabetic patients with asymptomatic gallstones, which is in contrast to recommendations for nondiabetics. More recent investigators have shown comparable rates of operative morbidity and mortality for biliary surgery in diabetics when compared with the general population. Recent studies have questioned whether diabetes is an independent risk factor for gallstone formation. Decision analyses using these new data have shown that prophylactic cholecystectomy is not of clear benefit and should not be routinely recommended for diabetics with asymptomatic gallstones. We believe that available data, although limited, indicate that asymptomatic patients with diabetes do not benefit from screening for gall-stones and that cholecystectomy should only be performed in cases of symptomatic cholelithiasis, as is the case in the general population. (Arch Intern Med. 1993;153:1053-1058) Continue reading >>

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