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Diabetes Gadgets 2016

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The Us?

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The Us?

By Lynn Kennedy, Ava Runge, and Adam Brown What Abbott, Dexcom, LifeScan, Medtronic, Tandem, and others are bringing to make diabetes easier and less burdensome Want more news just like this? We’re living in the most exciting time ever in diabetes technology, and a slew of soon-to-launch products are going to subtract hassle from living with diabetes – fewer injections and fingersticks, less math, less data overload, less pain, and less worry. Equally important, most emerging technology shows excellent potential to improve glucose outcomes that matter, among them hypoglycemia, time-in-range, hyperglycemia, and A1c. Curious what’s coming? Read on for a summary of the insulin delivery and glucose monitoring devices expected to launch in the US by mid-2017 or earlier, based on the most recent company timelines (listed chronologically). This list is not fully comprehensive, but does cover the major device launches expected. A more detailed description of each device follows further below. New Insulin Delivery Devices Tandem’s t:slim X2 Insulin Pump – October-December 2016. The latest Tandem pump will add a new Bluetooth radio and enable software updates to add future Dexcom G5 connectivity and automated insulin delivery algorithms. Medtronic MiniMed Pro Infusion Set with BD FlowSmart technology – around late 2016. The long-awaited infusion set has several key improvements, most notably a new catheter that allows insulin to flow out of two holes (less occlusions). LifeScan’s OneTouch Via – early 2017. The bolus-only, super slim wearable device holds 200 units of insulin and can be worn for three days. Squeezing two buttons (including through clothes) – will discreetly deliver a two-unit bolus. Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G/Enlite 3 Hybrid Closed Loop – by Ap Continue reading >>

New Ways For Monitoring Diabetes

New Ways For Monitoring Diabetes

A few months ago, WT published an article about diabetes. The facts are simple and the consequences are rapidly effecting today´s generation. The statistics published by International Diabetes Federation are astonishing and should be a warning to all people. You can learn more about the numbers concerning some of the studies at, Modern Man Disease. Unfortunately, diabetes has no immediate cure. Thousands of people are diagnosed each day. There are many options for monitoring glucose levels; from old invasive and painful devices, to now non-invasive Blood Glucose monitoring devices. For diabetics that are interested in learn about new, noninvasive technology, keep reading for a short review of the latest trends. DIA-VIT is a non-invasive glucose self-monitoring device. It measures the glucose level in your blood. Their smartphone app keeps a diary of your daily data, so you can track patterns in your fluctuation glucose level. By monitoring your condition, you are then able to be more aware of your condition. SugarBeat is a non-invasive patch. It contains an electronic sensor that detects real time measurements. The patch is disposable and is about 1mm thick. Your glucose level is measured through the skin every 5 minutes. SugarBeat is connected to an app where also all the readings are forwarded. GlucoTrack clippes to your earlobe in order to test your blood sugar level. The device contains 2 parts: Main Unit (MU) and ear clip. The ear clip doesn’t hurt, in fact it’s really simple. Just clip it on and tap-da! Your glucose level appears on the MU. GlucoTrack uses three independent technologies, simultaneously: ultrasonic, electromagnetic and thermal. All measurements are combined by a unique proprietary algorithm, which calculates the weighted average and returns th Continue reading >>

11 Gadgets To Help Manage Diabetes

11 Gadgets To Help Manage Diabetes

Managing diabetes is a full-time job, and you need the right tools for the task. Check out this list of gadgets that can help. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Managing type 2 diabetes is a full-time job, and having the right tools can make it a lot easier. Choosing wisely from the wide array of gadgets on the market can help bring you the best results in managing your diabetes. It's important that you're comfortable with and like the tools you use. When researchers asked 35 people with diabetes to use either a smartphone app or no app to track their blood sugar for 12 weeks, they discovered that the people who said they liked the app they were using also had better A1C numbers . These findings were published in the June 2014 issue of Diabetes & Metabolism Journal . Here are 11 gadgets to consider adding to your diabetes management toolbox: Glucose tablet holder. Because some medications or a new exercise routine can put you at risk for low blood sugar, you want to carry a source of glucose with you, says Betsy Sullivan, RN, a certified diabetes educator with the Penn Rodebaugh Diabetes Center in Philadelphia. If you choose glucose pills, a tablet holder both protects them and makes them easier to find in your purse or bag. Pill organizer. Keeping track of medications and your dosing schedule is easier with a plastic organizer. There are styles with one or more compartments for each day of the week. If you have a smartphone, set an alarm to go off every time you need to take your meds. In the future, you may be able to access a digital pill organizer that can even keep your doctor informed about when you take your medications, according to research published in Continue reading >>

10 Must Have Gadgets And Apps For Diabetics

10 Must Have Gadgets And Apps For Diabetics

10 Must Have Gadgets and Apps for Diabetics Apps Devices Diabetes disease Gadgets healthcare Thanks to the ever-evolving technology, managing diabetes has become a lot easier. Check out the apps and gadgets to consider adding to your diabetes management toolbox. When you are first diagnosed with diabetes, you experience a range of emotions. Many questions arise in your mind How will I treat my diabetes? Can I eat sweets and chocolates? How much physical activity do I have to do? Famous celebrities like Tom Hanks, Salma Hayek, Sonam Kapoor and Fawad Khan too suffer from the same condition. These celebrities did not allow diabetes to overrule their lives, in fact they modified their lifestyle along with fitness routine and are leading a productive life. Isnt that good news? We agree that taking care of diabetes and getting through your daily to-do list along with other responsibilities can be challenging. There are medication doses to calculate, carbohydrates to count, and blood sugar levels to track. But with good care, you avoid diabetes-related complications and live a long and healthy life. Thanks to the ever-evolving technology, managing diabetes has become a lot easier. Numerous gadgets and apps have come up to help you with nutrition advice, carb counting, tracking blood sugar levels, medication alerts and managing kids with diabetes. Check out the apps and gadgets to consider adding to your diabetes management toolbox: MiniMed 670G This is the Worlds First Hybrid Closed Loop System for People with Type 1 Diabetes. The MiniMed 670G system is made up of an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor (CGM), both of which are already on the market separately. The new part involves the communication between the two devices. This device predicts when a persons blood su Continue reading >>

7 New Diabetes Products To Look For In 2016

7 New Diabetes Products To Look For In 2016

As we predicted last December, 2015 saw the release of the Dexcom G4 Platinum with Share receiver, the Tandem t:slim G4 insulin pump, the Dexcom G5 Continuous Glucose Monitoring System, the Medtronic 640G with SmartGuard in Europe, and two novel new insulins (both from Sanofi) – Afrezza inhalable short-acting and Toujeo basal insulin. Also launched in 2015 were Eli Lilly’s Trulicity GLP-1 agonist and Novo Nordisk’s Tresiba basal insulin. Looking ahead to 2016, we’re optimistic about these seven diabetes products potentially hitting the market in the next 12 months. Insulet’s Omnipod Phoenix PDM Insulin Pump At the ADA Scientific Sessions in Boston this June, Insulet teased the crowd with a first look at the next generation controller for their popular patch insulin pump, the Phoenix PDM (Personal Diabetes Manager). The chunky plastic PDM controllers we saw in the UST200 and UST400 models will give way to a sleek, sexy color touchscreen interface. The Phoenix will be thinner than the UST400, black in color, and resemble a smartphone. Though the Phoenix will be Bluetooth-enabled, this PDM will not yet be integrated with the Dexcom G5, though we should see that product quickly on its coattails given that value-added capability. When might we see the Phoenix rise? In their Q3 earnings call on 5 November, Insulet CEO Patrick Sullivan said they are “on track to submit our Phoenix PDM product to the FDA in the middle of next year, and we would expect to have that on the market or approved by the end of next year.” Abbott Freestyle Libre Pro Flash Glucose Monitoring System (U.S.) The Freestyle Libre (consumer version) and Libre Pro (professional HCP-use version) might flash their way stateside in 2016. The first of its kind, the Libre is a factory-calibrated flash Continue reading >>

6 New Diabetes Products To Look For In 2017

6 New Diabetes Products To Look For In 2017

If we learned anything about diabetes products in 2016, it’s that progress can happen faster than we anticipate. The diabetes community was stunned in September when the FDA announced that it had approved Medtronic Diabetes’ MiniMed 670G system, the world’s first pump/sensor system to be able to dose insulin on its own. (Advocacy works!) One of the most exciting things about the approval of Medtronic’s 670G is not only access to the groundbreaking device itself, but the path it paves for similar products – by many companies – to win approval as well. (We’re keeping an eye on Bigfoot Biomedical, Inc, the company that back in July of this year enrolled its first patients in a clinical trial for the Bigfoot smartloop automated insulin delivery system.) Now, as this year comes to a close, we’re listening to the buzz that continues to build around the new diabetes technology coming our way in 2017. The new year will bring a slate of highly anticipated products, including milestone devices like the OneTouch Via (a bolus-only delivery patch) and the above-mentioned Medtronic MiniMed 670G system (widely regarded as a rudimentary artificial pancreas). We’ve rounded up descriptions of some of the most exciting diabetes products expected to hit the market in 2017, followed by an approximate timeframe of when they’ll become available to the public. Sure, what we really want is a cure in 2017, but we’ll take improved quality of life, thanks to new devices and tech, with tremendous gratitude. Animas G5 Integrated Vibe Insulin Pump and CGM System What it is: This pump integrates Dexcom G5 technology with the Animas Vibe system. It’s especially exciting because it’s the only pump of its kind that is available to patients with type one diabetes as young as 2 ye Continue reading >>

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

Source:Supplied AUSTRALIAN adults with diabetes now have the option of using a new glucose monitoring device, which eliminates the need for regular finger pricking. The system, which has been available in Europe for several years, involves a small sensor the size of a 20 cent coin worn on the upper arm for 14 days. Many diabetics have to draw blood and test their blood glucose levels up to 12 times a day. Instead of doing that, they can now scan the sensor and get a reading in less than a second. The Abbotts FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System also displays an eight-hour history and a trend arrow showing the direction the glucose is heading. The device will make life easier for people living with diabetes who use insulin, whether type 1 or type 2, said Diabetes Australia spokeswoman Renza Scibilia. Source:Supplied “Finger pricking is painful, inconvenient and intrusive, which is often why people don’t check their levels as often as they ideally should,” she told news.com.au. “It’s very different from just wearing a device on your arm and scanning it.” The disposable, water-resistant sensor needs to be replaced every 14 days and costs $95, while the reader is the same price. The Freestyle Libre can be purchased online via the official website. Ashley Ng, 26, from Melbourne, has been testing the device for two weeks and is a big fan. “I didn’t realise how much a burden finger-pricking was until I stopped,” Ms Ng told news.com.au. “Normally I’d prick myself 6-10 times a day. It’s something that I’ve always lived with and gotten used to, and now I don’t have to do it. She said she felt no pain when inserting the sensor into her arm. “The first couple of days I was like ‘Is this for real?’ I was feeling really great. My fingers f Continue reading >>

A Do-it-yourself Revolution In Diabetes Care

A Do-it-yourself Revolution In Diabetes Care

Health |A Do-It-Yourself Revolution in Diabetes Care A Do-It-Yourself Revolution in Diabetes Care John Costik, right, and his son Evan reflected on an iPads screen. An app on the device displays Evans blood sugar levels in real time. Credit Brendan Bannon for The New York Times John Costik got the call at the office in 2012. It was his wife, Laura, with terrible news: Their 4-year-old son, Evan, was headed into the emergency room. His blood sugar reading was sky high, about 535 mg/dl, and doctors had discovered he had Type 1 diabetes . The first three days in the hospital were a blur during which the Costiks, engineers in Rochester, received a crash course in managing the basics of diabetes care. For starters, they were told to log their sons numbers on paper forms. It was their first hint that diabetes management did not occupy a place on technologys bleeding edge. The methods for guesstimating carbohydrate intake also seemed imprecise, Mr. Costik found, and the process generated a lot of wasted data. The last thing you want to do is find some form and fill it out, he said. Youre really just emotionally trying to cope with it, and that data in that book isnt necessarily useful to the people with diabetes. So he examined the devices software code and wrote a simple program that transmitted the monitoring data to an online spreadsheet he could view on a Web browser, Android mobile phone or, eventually, his Pebble smartwatch. I wanted our lives to be simple, Mr. Costik said, and I wanted Evan to live a long time, and diabetes to be a nuisance, not a huge struggle. Mr. Costik shared a photograph of his simple hack on Twitter and discovered a legion of parents who were eager to tailor off-the-shelf devices into homemade solutions. Together, they have set in motion a remark Continue reading >>

Flore: The Wearable For All Diabetics.

Flore: The Wearable For All Diabetics.

Results Announced for Community Choice Prize See All Winners Flore is the first wearable device for diabetics that integrates biometrics to alleviate the stress of managing the disease. It's a small wearable device that all diabetics can use everyday to check their glucose levels, get motivated to exercise, get alerted when it's time to see your provider, get advice on healthy eating and life changing habits and most importantly - live a normal life with diabetes. This device consolidates each individual action that a current diabetic goes through on a daily basis and puts it into one device. They can carry it as a stand alone device, or they can clip it on with the optional silicone sleeve jacket. Flore is a communicator with your provider, sending all of your updated data and information live 24/7. It also communicates with your loved ones for up to date data on your health and status. In case your glucose level is dangerously low or high, it would notify emergency personnel. The breakthrough feature is this: it prevents any type of discomfort and painful pricking of the finger to check glucose levels. The back of the device has a finger scanner that uses near infrared spectroscopy technology to scan your blood without having to prick your finger to draw blood. Flore is here to help you live a normal healthy life. Good research and correct deployment of sensor technologies to develop a product that could be transformational for diabetics. Continue reading >>

World Health Day 2016: How Diabetes Technology Can Be A Real Life-saver

World Health Day 2016: How Diabetes Technology Can Be A Real Life-saver

World Health Day 2016: How diabetes technology can be a real life-saver Every year on April 7th, the World Health Organization (WHO) promotes World Health Day to shine a global spotlight on a major health issue. While previous campaigns have focused on topics such as food safety, heart health and ageing, World Health Day 2016 aims to increase awareness about the alarming rise in diabetes. Diabetes is a lifelong condition where the pancreas doesnt produce enough insulin to help glucose enter the bodys cells (Type 1) or any insulin that is produced by the body is not used correctly (Type 2). According to the WHO, about 350 million people worldwide have diabetes and this number is likely to more than double over the next 20 years. The danger diabetes poses shouldnt be underestimated either. In 2012, data showed that diabetes was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths, 80% of these occurring in low- and middle-income countries. Its not just a third world problem. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK, says Diabetes UK , plus an estimated 549,000 people who have the condition, but dont know it. Take control of your health by eating a diet high in fruits and vegetables. How do we combat diabetes? Step one is to try avoiding it. Eating a healthy diet high in fruits and vegetables and low in sugar and saturated fats can help prevent Type 2 diabetes. While staying physically active (through at least 30 minutes of regular, moderate-intensity activity on most days, recommends the WHO) can also minimise the risks. This is where technology can help. Fitness trackers like the Fitbit Alta, JawBone UP and the Basis Peak can highlight whether you are getting enough daily exercise, prompting you to change a sedentary lifestyle. While health-orientated mobile app Continue reading >>

The Future Of Diabetes Management

The Future Of Diabetes Management

One in eleven persons has to cope with diabetes worldwide on a daily basis According to the latest estimates of the WHO, 422 million people suffer from diabetes worldwide – and the number is growing steadily. It means that one person in eleven has to manage the chronic condition on a daily basis, which might lead to stroke, blindness, heart attack, kidney failure or amputation. There are two types of diabetes: when the body does not produce enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) and when the organism cannot utilize the generated insulin (type 2 diabetes). While the latter can be prevented with conscious lifestyle choices, the former is a mystery to the medical community. But if someone has diabetes, that means having a constant companion. In both cases, the treatment of the symptoms requires constant blood glucose control, which usually requires a kind of insulin intake at regular intervals, as well as blood pressure control and/or foot care. It is a truly technologically dependent condition: you need to monitor your blood glucose level, your blood pressure, your weight, follow a meal plan, test your blood every now and then. Luckily, there are so many digital health innovations for diabetes patients out there that diabetes management has been improving for years steadily – and it will significantly change in the coming years. But technology in itself is insufficient: you need people to utilize it – and diabetes patients do. It is one of the largest and most motivated communities both online and offline, sharing their experiences on social media and other platforms. I believe one of the most amazing development is due to the diabetes community: the #wearenotwaiting movement advocated the absolutely efficient DIY artificial pancreas for so long and so successfully that t Continue reading >>

Smart Technology For Diabetes Self-care

Smart Technology For Diabetes Self-care

Wearables, Implants, and Apps, Oh My! If you have diabetes, you must consistently monitor your diet, lifestyle, and glucose levels, and keeping track of everything can be both inconvenient and difficult. Matters can become even more complicated if you have other health conditions with which to contend. Fortunately, technology can help. Technological innovations Strides have been made to ensure technology keeps pace with assisting people in self-managing their diabetes. By incorporating a personalized approach, technology has become a useful tool; in particular, mobile and Internet-ready smartphones have been found to be the most effective for integrating diabetes care into day-to-day living. A 2009 study conducted by Julie Polisena and her team at the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health found storing or sharing self-monitored blood glucose using home telehealth tools such as PDAs or fax machines, supported with physician feedback, showed improved glycemic levels and reduced hospitalizations. Technology now has evolved beyond telehealth. Smart technology exists as wearables, implants, and mobile applications to track glucose levels, share data, access relevant information, communicate with both health-care providers and others with diabetes, and, ultimately, guide you in making better decisions. Wearable technology Wearable technology comprises gadgets that can be worn and are equipped with sensors and wireless connectivity to assist with monitoring blood sugar levels, personalizing treatment, connecting with health-care providers, and even delivering medication into the body. It’s a huge departure from the traditional finger pricking method of glucose monitoring. Some wearables on the horizon for diabetes include smart skin patches, contact lens, and Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Technology At Ces 2016 | Diabetesmine

New Diabetes Technology At Ces 2016 | Diabetesmine

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Every January, two important conferences bring together the electronics and healthcare sectors, giving us a glimpse of what's truly on the cutting edge in diabetes. The JP Morgan Healthcare conference for investors and industry execs kicked off in San Francisco this week, following last week's gi-normous Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas -- a bonanza of the latest and greatest gadgets and technology that hosts over 3,600 companies across 2.4 million square feet of expo space. Among the super-cool stuff displayed CES 2016 were a futuristic robot named Pepper ( hailed as "the closest thing to Rosie from The Jetsons yet"); countless smartwatches including the new Fitbit smartwatch; any number of new smart TVs and appliances that are all interconnected; and much, much more. Of course, healthcare has been an emerging focus at CES for about six years now with the breakout Digital Health Summit held there, and diabetes is always a key topic. Today we're looking some of the coolest announcements -- with respect to diabetes -- in the healthcare sector of CES 2016. (Stay tuned for our coverage of the JPM event early next week.) Medtronic made the biggest health headlines at CES, mainly by showcasing its partnership with IBM Watson Health originally announced in April 2014. Specifically, IBM's CEO Ginni Rometty delivered the event keynote, focusing on the cognitive computing intelligence known as IBM Watson that's being paired with medical and consumer electronic devices -- including the Minimed pump-CGM combo. Medtronic CEO Omar Ishrak joined her on stage for a demo of a new app that has the capability to predict hypog Continue reading >>

The Tech That Could Help Us Fight Diabetes

The Tech That Could Help Us Fight Diabetes

The tech that could help us fight diabetes The tech that could help us fight diabetes There are several technologies in development, but the message is "don't get your hopes up" As it's the start of Diabetes Week in the UK, we're taking a look at the technological advances around right now to help those fighting the disease - and whether help is really just over the horizon. The funny thing about today's health gadgets is that many of them are aimed at relatively healthy people people for whom the biggest lifestyle challenge is fitting into a pair of jeans from 2012, or doing a predefined activity faster than last week so that people on Facebook 'like' it. These devices can be little more than mechanical vanity hands that continually pat the wearer on the back, or clap him or her to a new PB. Fitbit is great for people who are already a bit fit. Some people, though, aren't as fortunate. Managing Type 1 diabetes (and insulin-dependent Type 2) is a bit of a crude body hack at the best of times. People used to always die because of T1, now they don't. But, while this is a miracle of modern medicine, people who live with Type 1 can be forgiven for not shouting the good news from the rooftops when their daily routine is governed by blood tests, and injections or insulin pumps, in order to maintain a healthy equilibrium. What sufferers want is for technology to provide a wireless, needle-free way of checking blood glucose. Such an innovation has been promised for 30 years, but while it seems like it should be relatively easy to achieve it's yet to become a reality it's forever just over the horizon, and that's where it's stayed. So what's holding this miracle tech back? The food we eat is converted to glucose for fuel, but in Type 1 diabetics that glucose stays in the bloods Continue reading >>

New High-tech Tools To Help Control Diabetes

New High-tech Tools To Help Control Diabetes

This content is selected and controlled by WebMD's editorial staff and is supported by Walgreens. High-Tech Tools to Help You Handle Diabetes By Susan Bernstein, Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on October 14, 2017 Because of your diabetes, you'll want to know about tools that help you track what you eat, what your blood sugar levels are, how much you exercise, and how you feel each day. Some of these include: Smartphone, tablet, or computer apps to log your blood sugar or meals and snacks Devices that test your sugar levels every few minutes "Smart pumps" that give you insulin as your body needs it Texts, calls, or emails that remind you to test or to take your medicine If you notice patterns in your levels over time, the information can help you and your doctor better manage yourdiabetes. To find out more, you or your doctor might use a device called a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) that can test your blood sugar every 5 minutes throughout the day. It tests through tiny fibers on a patch stuck on yourskin. Results are sent wirelessly to a small monitor or insulin pump. The results can help you and your doctor spot spikes after you eat certain foods or work out, or while yousleep, says Robert Vigersky, MD, medical director of Medtronic Diabetes. A continuous glucose monitor doesn't take the place of old-school testing, though. The device's maker says you need at least one finger stick every 12 hours to set the device, and suggests regular testing three to four times a day to make sure the numbers match up. New, "smartinsulinpumps" that can sync with a CGM are great for people withtype 1 diabetes, Vigersky says. "If your sugar goes too low, it will stop aninsulininfusion for 2 hours," he says. Smart pumps can help you avoid dangerous dips in your blood sugar. New smartp Continue reading >>

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