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Technologies For Diabetes Management 2017-2027: Forecasts, Players, Opportunities

Technologies For Diabetes Management 2017-2027: Forecasts, Players, Opportunities

Glucose sensors, ketone sensors, insulin pens and pumps This report from IDTechEx covers mature, growing and emerging fields in diabetes technology, researched through primary interviews with companies, physicians and diabetic individuals to establish how the technological roadmap for diabetes management will develop over the next decade. Historically glucose levels have been monitored using disposable biosensors, whereby a drop of blood is placed on to a sensor and an associated reader provides the result. While the glucose test strip industry produces billions of single use sensors a year, cuts to medical budgets are driving profitability down. Current invasive methods of glucose monitoring result in low patient compliance, leading to poor glucose control and the associated long term health implications. These factors have led both start-ups and established players in the field to develop novel glucose sensing platforms based on alternative sampling sites and detection methods. Whilst many of these technologies will not be able to precisely replicate the accuracy of blood glucose measurements, some are making progress towards this goal and are achieving regulatory approval to commercialise products in to this emerging market. Advancements in diabetes care are not limited to glucose monitoring, novel insulin delivery platforms provide another area of growth for the industry, with wearable insulin pumps now widely available. Such devices contain a range of sensors to that enable the safe and controlled delivery of insulin to a patient. Progression in both glucose monitoring and insulin delivery technologies are enabling the delivery of a previously conceptual artificial pancreas system, able to deliver controlled insulin doses, based on sensor outputs to optimise glucos Continue reading >>

The Freestyle Libre, A Device For Monitoring Blood Sugar, Is A Pleasure To Use.

The Freestyle Libre, A Device For Monitoring Blood Sugar, Is A Pleasure To Use.

Photo illustration by Slate. Photo by FreeStyle Libre. In the years after I was diagnosed at 24 with Type 1 diabetes, I would sometimes cry when I stopped to study my hands. Back then, the skin of my fingertips was pockmarked by tiny craters, traces of the blood tests I performed seven or more times a day. Though they would heal in time, others would immediately take their place. Merely knowing they were there was dispiriting, a reminder that my disease would always leave its mark on my body in one way or another. Successfully managing Type 1 diabetes requires almost relentless biomedical self-surveillance . You learn to count carbs, measure insulin doses, and track your glucose levels. Its the last of those thats the most frustrating for many who live with the disease, as the process has traditionally involved pricking your finger with a lancing device and then checking the capillary blood that springs forth. Typically, the process isnt that painful, but it can be messy, and the disposable single-use test strips it requires are often expensive, sometimes costing more than $1 each without insurance. (That may not sound like much, but it adds up if youre using them the recommended 48 times a day.) Perhaps more importantly, the information it reveals is limited, showing you where you stand in the moment but telling you nothing about whether your levels are rising, falling, or holding steady. That can be frustrating when you need it most, since it makes it hard to detect potentially dangerous rapid changes. More recently, continuous glucose monitors (or CGMs) have begun to smooth that process over somewhat. Mine, the Dexcom G5 , communicates information to my phone from a temporary sensor and transmitter that I attach to my stomach via a formidable-looking plunger device. Continue reading >>

Pipeline

Pipeline

Our #1-rated California-based Customer Support Team is available 24 hours per day and 365 days per year. Changing the face of insulin pump therapy The information below discusses development programs not approved by the FDA. This information is intended for investors researching the company, and is updated in conjunction with public announcements about our product pipeline. All dates below are as of March 1, 2018. Tandem undertakes no obligation to update or review any forward-looking information below based on new information, future events or other factors. From the beginning, we have taken a unique approach to product development. All of our products have been developed through an extensive, user-centric process involving thousands of interviews with pump users and healthcare providers. In addition, we have employed Human Factors research heavily in our development process. The first product from these efforts was the t:slim Insulin Pump, the first-generation touchscreen pump which consistently ranked #1 by pump users in independent research.1 Since then, we have also developed the Tandem Device Updater to deliver remote software updates for our insulin pumps through a customers personal computer, and a second-generation pump, the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump that builds on the original with a variety of improvements including an advanced Bluetooth radio for communication with future technologies.2 Below is a list of products we are working on for people with diabetes that continue our commitment to user-centric design and development. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology Moves Closer To Making Life Easier For Patients

Diabetes Technology Moves Closer To Making Life Easier For Patients

For people with diabetes, keeping blood sugar levels in a normal range – not too high or too low – is a lifelong challenge. New technologies to ease the burden are emerging rapidly, but insurance reimbursement challenges, supply shortages, and shifting competition make it tough for patients to access them quickly. One new product is a fast-acting insulin from Novo Nordisk. It is designed to help to minimize the high blood sugar spikes that often occur when people with diabetes eat a meal containing carbohydrates. This new formulation, branded "Fiasp," adds niacinamide (vitamin B3), which roughly doubles the speed of initial insulin absorption compared to current fast-acting insulins taken at mealtime. This new insulin hits the bloodstream in under three minutes. Another advance is Abbott's new monitoring device called the FreeStyle Libre Flash. It's new in the U.S. but has been available in Europe since 2014. It's a round patch with a catheter that is inserted on the arm for up to 10 days and a durable scanning device that the user waves over the patch to read the level of sugar in their tissues, which reflects the blood sugar level. The Libre works a bit differently than the two currently available continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) made by Dexcom and Medtronic. The Libre doesn't require users to prick their fingers for blood tests to calibrate it, whereas users of the other monitors must perform twice-daily fingerstick calibrations. Also, the Libre is approved for longer wear – 10 days (14 in Europe) versus seven days for the two current CGMs. And, it is likely to be considerably less expensive, although Abbott isn't providing cost information for the U.S. just yet. In Europe, the Libre system costs about four Euros a day (about $4.70). But, unlike the current d Continue reading >>

These Developments In Diabetes Care Will Shape The Industry Next Year

These Developments In Diabetes Care Will Shape The Industry Next Year

How Medtronic's MiniMed 670G grows Production delays hobbled the June launch of Medtronic's hybrid closed-loop system. The technology has been hailed as a milestone because it's the first insulin pump that delivers insulin somewhat automatically. The system combines a continuous glucose monitor, an algorithm and a pump. They work together to measure and analyze glucose levels to adjust the amount of insulin delivered accordingly. Medtronic's system is considered a hybrid closed-loop because although the Guardian Sensor 3 and MiniMed 670G pump work together, they still require some patient input. For example, patients need to enter information about what they're eating and calibrate their pumps using fingerstick testing. The Food and Drug Administration approved the system in September 2016, months earlier than expected. Medtronic had recently introduced the MiniMed 630G system, meaning a number of patients had just purchased a new device. The number of people wanting the new system caused a spike in demand that slowed production, creating a backlog of people waiting to buy it. The slowdown weighed on Medtronic's total diabetes segment, which accounts for about 7 percent of its total revenue. The category declined 2 percent in constant currency last quarter. It rose 4 percent last fiscal year, which ended in April. The company does not break out the total diabetes segment revenue by category, but intensive insulin management represents the bulk of its sales. That group declined low single digits last quarter. Last fiscal year, it grew high single digits. Medtronic expects to ramp up production in its fourth quarter, which ends in April. Analysts expect fixing the slowdown will help the diabetes segment grow again. Impact of Abbott's FreeStyle Libre Abbott launched its Fr Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: The Future Of Diabetes Management

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: The Future Of Diabetes Management

In Brief Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology has the potential to revolutionize diabetes care in the near future because of the real-time feedback it provides about therapeutic interventions and variations in lifestyle or dietary intake. In short, CGM has made the attainment of near-normal blood glucose concentrations an achievable goal for most patients with diabetes. Several challenges remain to be addressed, however, including the high cost of the devices, limitations in approved clinical uses, and insurance coverage for the technology. This article reviews the CGM technology currently available in the United States, its approved uses, and its limitations. There is a long history of technological advances being translated into improved diabetes management. A few examples include the discovery and mass production of insulin, the adoption of simple urine testing for glucose and ketones, the development of effective oral diabetes medications, the development of accurate capillary blood glucose measurement devices, and the refinement of practical and reliable subcutaneous insulin infusion pumps. More recently, engineering and scientific advances have allowed the development of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices that have proven useful for the day-to-day management of diabetes. Although these devices are expensive and not yet widely adopted by diabetes practitioners or patients, they have the potential to revolutionize diabetes care and make the attainment of near-normal blood glucose concentrations a reality. CGM: A Significant Advance in Diabetes Care Accurate determination of blood glucose concentrations is a prerequisite for the application of state-of-the-art intensified diabetes management. Until very recently, this determination could only be ac Continue reading >>

Care And Cure: Engineering The Future Of Diabetes Treatment

Care And Cure: Engineering The Future Of Diabetes Treatment

February 10, 2016 / 10:05 PM / in 2 years Care and Cure: Engineering the future of diabetes treatment Cambridge, MASS (Reuters) - For diabetics, life is a constant struggle to maintain balance - keeping track of your carbohydrate intake, constantly monitoring blood-sugar levels, and injecting insulin. Its a never-ending cycle to stay healthy. But now major advances in engineering could end that cycle. Two labs are tackling diabetes very differently. At Harvard University more than two decades of research aims at automating diabetic care by developing an artificial pancreas. Youve got the sensor, the way that we measure the critical variable, in this case glucose. You have the actuator that is the agent of change, thats the thing that influences your dynamic system. In this case that is a pump delivering insulin and then you have the controller, the brains, said Frank Doyle, Dean of the Harvard School of Engineering & Applied Sciences. Insulin pumps and sensors are commonplace, but developing an algorithm to allow these two technologies to work together has proven difficult. But several trials and another one just beginning are putting the artificial pancreas within reach. In essence, we use a patient model, a computational model, a mathematical model, to forecast into the future. So we get a sense of how past insulin affects future glucose, how the past trajectory of glucose is going to play out for the next hour or two, added Doyle, who has been working on the project for more than two decades. Within five years Doyle predicts a fully functional automated system for diabetes will exist. It wont be a single device, but a upgrades to devices biomedical companies already offer. Two miles away on the other side of Cambridge, Massachusetts, scientists at MIT are hoping to Continue reading >>

Artificial Pancreas: The Future Of Diabetes Treatment

Artificial Pancreas: The Future Of Diabetes Treatment

Managing diabetes can be challenging. Even with careful monitoring and use of insulin, it’s not always easy to keep blood sugar levels normal. An artificial pancreas may be a way to help people with type 1 diabetes manage their condition. Researchers began studying the potential of these devices decades ago. The FDA recently approved it for treating type 1 diabetes in people age 14 and older. Artificial pancreases hit the market in 2016. The devices automate blood sugar management. They dose the correct amount of insulin when the body needs it. A smart phone or tablet can direct a computer program that controls the artificial pancreas. It links to a glucose monitor sensor and insulin pump to find out blood sugar patterns and control insulin delivery. The pancreas releases hormones and digestive enzymes in the body. Insulin is a hormone that allows glucose (sugar) uptake from the blood into the cells to use for energy. This process lowers blood glucose levels. Glucagon is another hormone in the pancreas. It causes the liver to release stored glucose. This raises blood glucose levels. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas can’t make the insulin needed to regulate a person’s blood glucose. Glucose stays in the blood. Insulin is not available to allow for cellular uptake. This makes blood sugar levels rise. It can cause serious acute and chronic health problems. The “hybrid system” is the only type of artificial pancreas available. It’s closed-loop system includes a sensor attached to the body. It measures glucose levels every five minutes. It also automatically gives or withholds insulin via an insulin pump. The pump is attached to the body via a catheter connected to the insulin pump. It also contains a computer chip that determines insulin doses. It’s considered Continue reading >>

'smart' Diabetes Technology On The Horizon - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

'smart' Diabetes Technology On The Horizon - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

Diabetes Ireland > Latest Articles > Smart Diabetes Technology on the Horizon Smart Diabetes Technology on the Horizon People with diabetes today spend hours each week carefully tracking blood glucose levels, food intake and physical exercise to calculate when and how much insulin should be injected into their bodies. Living with diabetes requires constant vigilance and a strong sense of self-determination and efficacy. While diabetes research has made enormous strides in the past decade, those living with the condition are still faced with the daily reality of the fact that a cure remains elusive. As such, much of the current research has centered on the improvement of maintenance technologies. While the implementation of these treatments an artificial pancreas, insulin inhaler, and a myriad of mobile apps, among others has been less efficient than most would say is ideal, the proliferation of smart devices has positioned such new technologies to play a pivotal role in the way diabetes is controlled and monitored. With a health condition like diabetes, where the individual is responsible for round-the-clock self-monitoring, there are many benefits to come from care that is both increasingly automated and personalised for the individual. While many of us already use phone apps to help manage glucose levels, there are a multitude of other devices in development striving to offer new ways for both people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes to gain better control over this condition. Many of these new tools are influenced by healthcares recent progression towards greater patient-physician connectivity. The increased usage of mobile apps and patient portals to engage with people with diabetes allows researchers access to a plethora of useful data for analysis. Utilising techno Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Technology In 2030: A Utopian Or Dystopian Future?

Diabetes And Technology In 2030: A Utopian Or Dystopian Future?

Diabetes and technology in 2030: a utopian or dystopian future? Sansum Diabetes Research Institute, Santa Barbara, California and Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, San Mateo, CA, USA. Diabet Med. 2018 Apr;35(4):498-503. doi: 10.1111/dme.13586. Epub 2018 Feb 9. The ability of an individual living with diabetes to have human-to-human contact with their healthcare provider is not keeping pace with the number of people developing diabetes. From a futurist perspective, however, this dichotomy of diabetes care represents an opportunity for digital healthcare. The focus of technological innovation is unlikely to be the replacement of the multidisciplinary diabetes team but rather the provision of meaningful individual and family support between clinic visits and, on a larger scale, the facilitation of population health management for diabetes. We can also expect to see new therapies, including implantable drug delivery systems, automated closed-loop systems and miniaturized non-invasive glucose monitoring systems. New digital health technologies will create a 'digital diabetes ecosystem' to enhance rather than devolve care from humans. Concerns related to data privacy and ownership will inevitably rise, thus a future for diabetes care relying heavily on technology is not inevitably utopian. Nevertheless, revolutions in the development of novel sensors, accumulation of 'big data', and use of artificial intelligence will provide exciting opportunities for preventing, monitoring and treating diabetes in the near future. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment In 2025: Can Scientific Advances Keep Pace With Prevalence?

Diabetes Treatment In 2025: Can Scientific Advances Keep Pace With Prevalence?

Go to: Introduction Before the availability of insulin in the 1920s, hailed not only as the cure for diabetes but also as one of the greatest advances in the treatment of any disease, a person diagnosed with diabetes would have faced death within a few years. Today, diabetes is not the devastating diagnosis it would have been 100 years ago; in fact, it is now a common misconception among the public that diabetes is not a serious disease. In reality, the impact of diabetes is so significant that it is affecting overall life expectancy: in the United States (US), life expectancy is falling for the first time since statistics were collected, due to obesity and diabetes [Olshansky et al. 2005], and estimates of diabetes prevalence over the coming years suggest many of us reading this article will develop diabetes during our lives [Whiting et al. 2011]. The predictions of the increased prevalence of diabetes are rarely accompanied by predictions of improvements in the treatment of diabetes; however, given the impact of diabetes, it has been the focus of intensive research, resulting in major advances in our understanding of diabetes as well as in treatment options. As the centenary of the discovery of insulin approaches, it seems timely to consider how treatment options may look in the 2020s, and the likelihood that the elusive cure for diabetes could be found by that time. Go to: Technological solutions The majority of cases of diabetes are type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and the predicted rise in diabetes prevalence is expected to be driven by increases in the number of T2DM cases. However, it is likely that significant advances in therapy for T2DM will result from the research in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), as they are both essentially disorders of glucose managemen Continue reading >>

The Freedom Of Diabetes Tech

The Freedom Of Diabetes Tech

It all started out innocently enough on the first day of diabetes camp. I can eat anything I want, exclaimed Joey, a 14-year-old boy with type 1 diabetes. He had recently gotten a Medtronic 670g , the hybrid closed loop insulin pump that automatically adjusts the basal insulin release in reaction to blood sugar levels, although it does not account for food intake. Many kids have felt this way over the years, after counting thousands of carbs and watching what they ate for every minute of every day, an insulin pump offered a respite from the daily trials and tribulations of intensive insulin therapy. Insulin pumps now store a users insulin-to-carb ratio for every meal (and hour) of the day, to better mimic what a pancreas would automatically release (for instance, an insulin pump can store a 1:5 ratio for breakfast and a 1:15 ratio for lunchtime, because many people face dawn phenomenon in the morning hours, and this helps to prevent hyperglycemia more effortlessly). Many kids dont even need to know their insulin-to-carb ratios anymore, as the pump always remembers as long as one is able to type in the amount of carbs theyre consuming. This comes with a certain amount of freedom. But freedom, like anything, can have its limits. Unlimited cookies, cakes, ice-cream, and desserts can add up in a bad way. Children are losing sight of the fact that they have an autoimmune disease that is defined by the fact that they are unable to properly break down glucose. Think of it another way: if a child is deathly allergic to peanut butter, but can take an EpiPen injection to save his life, would it be ideal to eat peanut butter every single day? Children with diabetes are forgetting how to calculate their insulin needs, so if (and when) their pumps break down, they have no idea how Continue reading >>

Helmsley Charitable Trust Announces Funding Opportunity To Advance Disruptive Technologies For Type 1 Diabetes

Helmsley Charitable Trust Announces Funding Opportunity To Advance Disruptive Technologies For Type 1 Diabetes

News, Events and Publications / Helmsley Charitable Trust Announces Funding Opportunity to Advance Disruptive Technologies for Type 1 Diabetes Helmsley Charitable Trust Announces Funding Opportunity to Advance Disruptive Technologies for Type 1 Diabetes 01.16.18 | Type 1 Diabetes | Helmsley Announcements New York, NYThe Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trusts Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Program today announced a funding opportunity through the new Future Technologies Initiative . Helmsleys Future Technologies Initiative aims to accelerate the development of novel, early-stage, disruptive technologies that have the potential to change the current state of T1D management and significantly improve glucose control while reducing the burden for people living with T1D. T1D requires individuals to use imperfect tools to mimic the bodys pancreas, which regulates blood sugars in a timely and precise manner. Mimicking the pancreas is an impossible task that involves hundreds of day-to-day, minute-to-minute, life-and-death decisions with insulin, a drug that could be deadly if miscalculated. As a result, it is incredibly difficult for individuals with T1D to maintain proper glycemic control and avoid the risk of associated health complications. With this RFP, we hope to attract novel approaches and advance the progress of early-stage ideas so we can get meaningful technology into the hands of people living with this disease. While new technologies have been shown to improve glucose control and reduce the burden of living with T1D, a large majority of people living with T1D are still not meeting recommended target average blood glucose levels. In the last number of years, we have seen great advances in diabetes technology. However, gaps still exist in managing this difficult di Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The Us?

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The Us?

By Lynn Kennedy, Ava Runge, and Adam Brown What Abbott, Dexcom, LifeScan, Medtronic, Tandem, and others are bringing to make diabetes easier and less burdensome Want more news just like this? We’re living in the most exciting time ever in diabetes technology, and a slew of soon-to-launch products are going to subtract hassle from living with diabetes – fewer injections and fingersticks, less math, less data overload, less pain, and less worry. Equally important, most emerging technology shows excellent potential to improve glucose outcomes that matter, among them hypoglycemia, time-in-range, hyperglycemia, and A1c. Curious what’s coming? Read on for a summary of the insulin delivery and glucose monitoring devices expected to launch in the US by mid-2017 or earlier, based on the most recent company timelines (listed chronologically). This list is not fully comprehensive, but does cover the major device launches expected. A more detailed description of each device follows further below. New Insulin Delivery Devices Tandem’s t:slim X2 Insulin Pump – October-December 2016. The latest Tandem pump will add a new Bluetooth radio and enable software updates to add future Dexcom G5 connectivity and automated insulin delivery algorithms. Medtronic MiniMed Pro Infusion Set with BD FlowSmart technology – around late 2016. The long-awaited infusion set has several key improvements, most notably a new catheter that allows insulin to flow out of two holes (less occlusions). LifeScan’s OneTouch Via – early 2017. The bolus-only, super slim wearable device holds 200 units of insulin and can be worn for three days. Squeezing two buttons (including through clothes) – will discreetly deliver a two-unit bolus. Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G/Enlite 3 Hybrid Closed Loop – by Ap Continue reading >>

New Technologies For Diabetes: A Review Of The Present And The Future

New Technologies For Diabetes: A Review Of The Present And The Future

New technologies for diabetes: a review of the present and the future 1The Childrens Hospital at Montefiore, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology & Diabetes, 3415 Bainbridge Ave, Bronx, NY, 10467, USA 1The Childrens Hospital at Montefiore, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology & Diabetes, 3415 Bainbridge Ave, Bronx, NY, 10467, USA 2Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA 1The Childrens Hospital at Montefiore, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology & Diabetes, 3415 Bainbridge Ave, Bronx, NY, 10467, USA 2Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA Received 2012 Aug 17; Accepted 2012 Oct 15. Copyright 2012 Ramchandani and Heptulla; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. This review summarizes the technologies in use and in the pipeline for the management of diabetes. The review focuses on glucose meters, continuous glucose monitoring devices, insulin pumps, and getting clinicians connected to technologies. All information presented can be found in the public domain, and was obtained from journal articles, websites, product review tables in patient publications, and professional conferences. The technology concerns, ongoing development and future trends in this area are also discussed. Keywords: Diabetes technology, Continuous glucose monitoring, Insulin pump, Blood glucose meter, New therapies, Inhaled insulin, Insulin patch, Insulin pill, SmartInsulin This review summarizes currently available glucos Continue reading >>

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