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Diabetes From Drinking

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Alcohol, And Social Drinking

Diabetes, Alcohol, And Social Drinking

People with diabetes should be particularly cautious when it comes to drinking alcohol because alcohol can make some of the complications of diabetes worse. First of all, alcohol impacts the liver in doing its job of regulating blood sugar. Alcohol can also interact with some medications that are prescribed to people with diabetes. Even if you only rarely drink alcohol, talk with your healthcare provider about it so that he or she knows which medications are best for you. Here’s what you need to know: 1. Alcohol interacts with diabetes medications Alcohol can cause blood glucose levels to rise or fall, depending on how much you drink. Some diabetes pills (including sulfonylureas and meglitinides) also lower blood glucose levels by stimulating the pancreas to make more insulin. Combining the blood-sugar-lowering effects of the medication with alcohol can lead to hypoglycemia or “insulin shock,” which is a medical emergency. 2. Alcohol prevents your liver from doing its job The main function of your liver is to store glycogen, which is the stored form of glucose, so that you will have a source of glucose when you haven’t eaten. When you drink alcohol, your liver has to work to remove it from your blood instead of working to regulate blood sugar, or blood glucose. For this reason, you should never drink alcohol when your blood glucose is already low. 3. Never drink alcohol on an empty stomach Food slows down the rate at which alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream. Be sure to eat a meal or snack containing carbohydrates if you are going to drink alcohol. 4. Always test blood sugar before having an alcoholic beverage Alcohol impairs your liver’s ability to produce glucose, so be sure to know your blood glucose number before you drink an alcoholic beverage. 5. Al Continue reading >>

Drinking And Diabetes: Seven Facts To Know

Drinking And Diabetes: Seven Facts To Know

April is a time for showers, taxes, and the Boston Marathon. It’s also Alcohol Awareness Month. Given this, I thought it would be appropriate to review a few facts about alcohol and how people with diabetes may be affected by its use. 1. Alcohol is not carbohydrate, protein, or fat. Most of us know that calories come from the three main nutrients (called macronutrients) in the food that we eat: carbohydrate (carb), protein, and fat. Carb and protein contain 4 calories per gram, while fat contains 9 calories per gram. These nutrients are also called essential nutrients because we must take them in from food and they serve vital roles in the body. So where does alcohol fall into the mix? Alcohol isn’t an essential nutrient, nor, as I’ve mentioned, is it classified as carb, protein, or fat. But it does contain calories — 7 calories per gram, to be exact. If you’re watching your weight, you need to keep an eye on how much alcohol you drink. Additionally, alcohol contains little, if any, vitamins and minerals, unlike carb, protein, and fat foods. Technically, alcohol is considered to be a drug, as it can have potentially harmful effects. 2. Alcohol is metabolized, or processed, by the liver. If you drink alcohol, your body kicks into gear to metabolize it because, unlike carb, protein, and fat, the body has no way to store alcohol. Once the alcohol hits your stomach, about 20% of it is absorbed into the bloodstream, and the rest enters your intestines where it’s digested. A small amount is excreted through the urine, sweat, skin, and your breath. The liver is a key organ for alcohol metabolism; it detoxifies alcohol through a process called oxidation, oxidizing alcohol at a rate of about 1/4 to 1/3 of an ounce per hour. 3. Alcohol can lower blood sugar levels. Yo Continue reading >>

Beer And Health: Nine Questions Answered

Beer And Health: Nine Questions Answered

In honor of International Beer Day, an unofficial holiday that was observed on August 1, I thought I’d take the opportunity this week to focus on this well-loved beverage. Beer has been around for a long time. Evidence of beer dates back about 5,000 years (those ancient Sumerians surely knew how to have a good time). Archeologists have unearthed vessels from about 3,400 BC lined with beer residue. And the ancient Egyptians enjoyed beer as part of their daily lives — even children drank this bubbly brew. What is beer? According to the website A Perfect Pint, beer is an alcoholic beverage usually made from malted cereal grain such as barley that is flavored with hops (female flowers of the hop plant that impart a bitter flavor) and brewed by fermentation with yeast. (The fermentation process is what creates the alcohol.) Some craft beers are made with grains such as rice, corn, or sorghum instead of barley. What are the different types of beer? There are two main types of beer: ales and lagers. The difference lies in the temperature at which the beer is fermented and the type of yeast used. Ales are generally fermented at warmer temperatures than lagers and involve top-fermenting yeasts that rise to the surface of the liquid (lagers are made by a bottom-fermenting yeast). Ales come in a number of varieties, including India pale ale (IPA), Irish red ale, Flanders red ale, and Dunkelweizen. Lager varieties include Märzenbier, Munich Dunkel, and Doppelbock. How much alcohol is in beer? The alcohol content of beer typically ranges from roughly 2% to 12% but can vary considerably depending on the type. Most beers are, on average, about 5% alcohol. Alcohol content is based on volume. Light beer, by the way, is beer that contains less alcohol and/or fewer calories. What i Continue reading >>

Regular Alcohol Drinkers Have Lower Risk Of Diabetes, According To A Huge New Study

Regular Alcohol Drinkers Have Lower Risk Of Diabetes, According To A Huge New Study

There's a new checkmark in the 'drinking isn't all bad for you' column. According to a new study that looked at more than 70,000 Danish people, those who drink small to moderate amounts of alcohol on a frequent basis are less likely to develop diabetes than people who don't drink at all. To be clear, these results shouldn't be seen as license or encouragement to drink freely as a health-promoting exercise. But they do provide further evidence that, for some reason, people who drink moderately are less likely to suffer from certain illnesses, including some cardiovascular diseases and type-2 diabetes. Regular drinking and diabetes For the new study, researchers wanted to see how much alcohol consumption was associated with the lowest diabetes risk, and determine whether the type of alcohol or the frequency that people drank mattered. Using data from the Danish Health Examination Survey, they looked at the drinking habits of 28,704 men and 41,847 women, and tracked whether those people developed diabetes within approximately five years. The researchers excluded anyone who already had diabetes, was pregnant at the start of the study, and didn't provide information on their alcohol consumption. The results showed that the study participants least likely to develop diabetes drank 3-4 days a week. For men, those who drank 14 drinks per week had the lowest risk, as the chart on the left shows below. For women, those who drank nine drinks per week had the lowest risk, as the right-hand chart shows. Risk for diabetes in 28,704 men (a) and 41,847 women (b) from the general Danish population according to average weekly alcohol amount. Dotted lines represent 95% confidence intervals. Diabetologia, 2017 As the U-shaped risk curve shows, study participants who didn't drink at all see Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Alcohol confused many young people we talked to for this project - many said they didn't know what a 'unit' of alcohol was - and several had ended up in hospital after evenings out drinking. One young woman said the 'culture of drinking' was hard to handle when she was 16 and she wanted to fit in with her friends. Most young people said that they enjoyed drinking and had learned by trial and error which drinks they could take. Some had had experimented with different drinks to see how they felt, and several had experienced hypos from drinking too much - and said that afterwards they took more care. Everyone said they had been told they must eat before they had a drink and that it was very important to eat something starchy (like bread or cereals) after they had been out drinking and before they went to bed. They understood that they risked having a hypo if they didn't eat before going to sleep. And do you drink alcohol? Yes, probably more than I should. It's a, it's not really, it's not been a particularly big problem. I mean obviously a student at university, everyone drinks kind of a fair bit from time to time, but as long as you don't go and make a complete mess of yourself it's not normally been too much of a problem. So kind of drink and have fun, but don't go and wake up in the gutter somewhere. That's pretty much the same advice you'd give to anyone, but you have to kind of be a bit more strict with yourself about following it really. Which kind of safety guidelines do you follow? Do you eat before you, if you know that you're going to drink, do you eat beforehand? Yes, definitely. There was one time when I started drinking without eating and it played all kinds of havoc. It was quite interesting the way that different drinks affect my blood sugar as well. So if Continue reading >>

Alcoholism And Diabetes: Exploring The Connection

Alcoholism And Diabetes: Exploring The Connection

Type 1 diabetes develops when the pancreas either cannot produce insulin or produces too little to be effective. Formerly known as juvenile diabetes, Type 1 diabetes typically develops in late childhood or adolescence; it can be genetic, or develop after a bout of viral infection or due to an autoimmune disease. It generally produces more serious symptoms than other types of diabetes, and those who suffer from Type 2 diabetes will need insulin therapy to manage their conditions. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disorder. It develops when either the pancreas does not produce adequate insulin or the body cannot properly utilize the insulin that is being released. Genetic influences make some people more vulnerable to Type 2 diabetes, but lifestyle factors such as obesity, poor nutrition and a lack of physical exercise are what usually trigger its onset. Through lifestyle modifications, the symptoms of Type 2 diabetes can often (but not always) be managed without insulin therapy. Gestational diabetes only occurs in pregnant women, and will only be diagnosed if theyve never suffered from diabetes before. Gestational diabetes causes glucose levels to rise during the the time a fetus is in the womb, and if left untreated can cause the unborn child to develop health complications immediately or later in life. Type 2 diabetes does not develop overnight. A person is usually in a pre-diabetic stagewhen his or her glucose levels are higher than normal but not as high as that of a diabeticfor some time before he or she develops type 2 diabetes. As many as 86 million Americans suffer from prediabetes. They are at a greater risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than people whose blood sugar levels are within the normal range. The problematic relationship between type 2 di Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

If you have diabetes, drinking alcohol may cause your blood sugar to either rise or fall. Plus, alcohol has a lot of calories. If you drink, do it occasionally and only when your diabetes and blood sugar level are well-controlled. If you are following a calorie-controlled meal plan, one drink of alcohol should be counted as two fat exchanges. It is a good idea to check with your doctor to see if drinking alcohol is safe for you. Here are some other ways that alcohol can affect diabetes: While moderate amounts of alcohol may cause blood sugar to rise, excess alcohol can actually decrease your blood sugar level -- sometimes causing it to drop into dangerous levels, especially for people with type 1 diabetes. Beer and sweet wine contain carbohydrates and may raise blood sugar. Alcohol stimulates your appetite, which can cause you to overeat and may affect your blood sugar control. Alcoholic drinks often have a lot of calories, making it more difficult to lose excess weight. Alcohol may also affect your judgment or willpower, causing you to make poor food choices. Alcohol can interfere with the positive effects of oral diabetes medicines or insulin. Alcohol may increase triglyceride levels. Alcohol may increase blood pressure. Alcohol can cause flushing, nausea, increased heart rate, and slurred speech. These may be confused with or mask the symptoms of low blood sugar. People with diabetes who drink should follow these alcohol consumption guidelines: Do not drink more than two drinks of alcohol in a one-day period if you are a man, or one drink if you are a woman. (Example: one alcoholic drink = 5-ounce glass of wine, 1 1/2-ounce "shot" of liquor or 12-ounce beer). Drink alcohol only with food. Drink slowly. Avoid "sugary" mixed drinks, sweet wines, or cordials. Mix liquor Continue reading >>

And Diabetes

And Diabetes

Diabetes is a common, life-long condition that occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. Drinking to excess, for example, can contribute to individuals becoming diabetic. Diabetes is a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations2. There are two main types of diabetes3 Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: Because of genetic factors When a virus or infection triggers an autoimmune response (where the body starts attacking itself). People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed before they’re 40 and there’s currently no way to prevent it. It’s the least common type of diabetes – only 10% of all cases are type 14. Type 2 diabetes. Develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the body becomes resistant to insulin. It can happen: When people are overweight and inactive. People who are an ‘apple-shape’ (with lots of fat around the abdomen) have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes Because of genetic factors. People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed when they’re over 40, and it’s more common in men. However, more overweight children and Continue reading >>

Is It True Alcoholism Leads To Diabetes?

Is It True Alcoholism Leads To Diabetes?

A frequent question when it comes to alcohol is the link of alcoholism with diabetes and whether or not alcoholism leads to diabetes. There are millions of people in the U.S. impacted by diabetes and also by alcoholism, and there are links between the two chronic diseases. Diabetes is a chronic condition where the pancreas doesn’t produce an adequate amount of insulin, or the insulin doesn’t function as it should. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the blood to the cells where it can then be turned into energy. With diabetes, glucose builds up in your blood and doesn’t go to your cells. There are two kinds of diabetes which are Type 1 and Type 2. The development of Type 1 diabetes is usually the result of genetics, or the body having an autoimmune response. Most people with Type 1 diabetes are diagnosed when they’re younger, and there’s no way to prevent it. Type 2 happens when the body makes insulin but it’s not enough, or a person’s body eventually becomes insulin-resistant. It can be somewhat attributed to genetic factors, but it’s also more common in people who are overweight and not physically active. Usually, this diagnosis comes when a person is older than 40, but as obesity has become such a big problem in developed countries, cases of Type 2 diabetes in younger people are on the rise. Type 2 diabetes progresses over the years, while Type 1 diabetes usually becomes obvious very quickly and symptoms dissipate quickly once a person receives treatment. So what about whether or not alcoholism leads to diabetes? There are ways alcoholism can contribute to the development not of Type 1 diabetes, but of Type 2. First, when you drink large amounts of alcohol, it can make your body less sensitive to insulin, which is a trigger for Type 2 dia Continue reading >>

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Comprehensive Guide to Research on Risk, Complications and Treatment Substance abuse is described as the excessive use of a substance such as alcohol or drugs that results in significant clinical impairments as well as the loss of ability to function academically, professionally, and socially [1]. An individual who was healthy before the substance abuse began will typically begin to experience serious health problems over time, but extensive damage may be avoided or reversed if effective substance abuse treatment is received. This is not the case, however, for individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes, and although this is a manageable disease with proper treatment, substance abuse may cause it to become life-threatening. This guide will discuss, in detail, how substance abuse can negatively impact the life and health of a person with diabetes. Diabetes, also referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a condition in which the body is unable to properly regulate blood sugar levels. There are two forms known as type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but in order to better understand the difference between the two types, the role that insulin plays in the regulation of healthy blood sugar levels will be briefly described. During the digestive process, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is a form of sugar that easily enters the bloodstream and is used by the body for energy. The pancreas normally responds to increasing blood sugar levels by initiating the production of the hormone known as insulin. As insulin levels increase, it signals the transfer of glucose into cells throughout the body and it also ensures that excess glucose will be stored in the liver in order to prevent high blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes, which is also called juvenile or insulin dependent Continue reading >>

A Look At Alcohol And The Risk Of Diabetes

A Look At Alcohol And The Risk Of Diabetes

Think of type 2 diabetes and you probably think of obesity: and it is true – excess weight is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Diabetes can be a vicious disease. At its worst it can lead to amputations, blindness, organ failure, and early death. But what about alcohol – can alcohol cause diabetes? How Does Diabetes Work? It’s like this: In the body food is turned into sugar. An excess of food, especially sweets, will turn into an excess of sugar. (While alcohol is not a sugar it is a high-glycemic carbohydrate.) This creates an increased demand for insulin in the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body convert food into usable energy. The body’s sensitivity to the hormone is reduced when insulin levels are consistently high and glucose builds up in the blood. This results in a condition called insulin resistance. Over time, excessive alcohol consumption can decrease the effectiveness of insulin. For the body that cannot make proper use of this glucose, it will instead build up in the blood rather than moving into the cells where it’s needed. Symptoms can include fatigue, hunger, brain fog, and high blood pressure – and not least of all, weight gain. People who have insulin resistance most often don’t realize it’s a problem until it develops into full blown type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can seriously affect quality of life and reduce life expectancy: A 50 year old with diabetes can lose 8.5 of life compared to a 50 year old without diabetes. What Is the Correlation Between Alcohol and Diabetes? While moderate drinking may not necessarily have harmful effects in the development of diabetes, and in fact can even have protective qualities, heavy drinking can be extremely Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol Consumption: Sip Slowly

Diabetes And Alcohol Consumption: Sip Slowly

Beneficial Effect Of Alcohol In Moderation Theres no need for people with diabetes to completely give up on alcohol. However, diabetes and alcohol in excess dont mix well. This is because people with this condition have a hormonal defect wherein their insulin levels are too low. Insulin is in charge of converting glucose from food to cellular energy that fuels us. If there is a lack of insulin in the bloodstream, there is also an excess glucose in the system. Over time, high glucose levels damage all major organs in the body, including the kidneys, heart, and eyes. Those who dont maintain their glucose levels are at an increased risk of developing severe diseases and conditions related to organ damage. In the very worst cases, patients may suffer from strokes, nerve damage, cardiovascular diseases, blindness, kidney failure, and even death. Unfortunately, as of yet, there is no cure for diabetes. The most patients are able to do is maintain the disease. Before considering how alcohol and diabetes interact, we need to understand the different types of the disease. Most people have heard about the type I or II diabetes, but what does that actually mean? These two major types are life-long conditions affecting the bodys ability to use the energy from food. Type I diabetes is the less common but more serious form of the condition. This autoimmune disease is your own body attacking its pancreas (concerned with blood sugar regulation) with antibodies, resulting in the inability to produce insulin. It most often begins in childhood and the treatment includes injecting insulin on a frequent basis. Dieting and exercise also play an important role in maintaining type I diabetes. Type II diabetes is the more common type, accounting for some 95% of the cases. It either happens whe Continue reading >>

Alcohol Consumption And The Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes

Alcohol Consumption And The Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes

A 20-year follow-up of the Finnish Twin Cohort Study Abstract OBJECTIVE—The aim of this study was to investigate alcohol consumption in relation to the incidence of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The study population consisted of 22,778 twins of the Finnish Twin Cohort. This cohort was compiled in 1975 and includes all same-sexed twins born in Finland before 1958. Information on alcohol, smoking, diet, physical activity, medical, and social conditions was obtained by questionnaires administered in 1975, 1981, and 1990. By record linkage to national registers of hospital discharge and prescribed medication, 580 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were identified during 20 years of follow-up. RESULTS—Moderate alcohol consumption (5–29.9 g/day in men and 5–19.9 g/day in women) tended to be associated with a reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes compared with low consumption (<5 g/day). The estimates were lower in overweight (BMI ≥25.0 kg/m2) subjects (relative risk 0.7, 95% CI 0.5–1.0 [men]; 0.6, 0.3–1.1 [women]). High alcohol consumption (≥20 g/day) was associated with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes in lean women (2.9, 1.1–7.5) but not in overweight women or in men. In women, binge drinking was associated with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes (2.1, 1.0–4.4). Analyses of alcohol-discordant twin pairs supported a reduced risk in moderate consuming twins compared with their low-consuming cotwins (odds ratio 0.5, 95% CI 0.2–1.5). CONCLUSIONS—The results of this study suggested that moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, binge drinking and high alcohol consumption may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes in women. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the Continue reading >>

Binge Drinking Raises Risk For Type 2 Diabetes Via Insulin Resistance

Binge Drinking Raises Risk For Type 2 Diabetes Via Insulin Resistance

Binge drinking directly causes insulin resistance, which in turn leads to type 2 diabetes. This was the finding of a new study on rats, that the researchers say is the first to show binge drinking alone, separate from other factors like overeating, increases risk for type 2 diabetes. People with a history of binge drinking have a higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. But until this study it was not clear how the link worked, and whether binge drinking alone raised the risk. Researchers at the Diabetes Obesity and Metabolism Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York, write about their findings in the 30 January issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine. They also found that alcohol appears to disrupt insulin-receptor signaling by causing inflammation in the hypothalamus, an area of the brain that among other things, is important for metabolic processes. Insulin Resistance The main role of the insulin receptor is to control the uptake of glucose. Decrease in signaling of this receptor means the cells can't take up glucose, and the result is hyperglycemia (too much glucose in the blood), and other consequences of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is where insulin does not bind properly to the receptor, thus hampering its ability to send the right signals to cells so they can use glucose for energy. This can happen even when the pancreas is producing enough insulin to keep glucose levels under control. A symptom of insulin resistance is high levels of insulin in the bloodstream. This is a major component of metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that together increase the risk for type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, and stroke. Senior author Christoph Buettner, an Associate Professor of Medicine, Continue reading >>

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