diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Food Guide Canada

Food Guide Basics - Canada.ca

Food Guide Basics - Canada.ca

Eat well with Canada's Food Guide! Learning more about Canada's Food Guide will help you and your family know how much food you need, what types of foods are better for you, and the importance of physical activity in your day. Having the amount and type of food recommended and following the tips included in Canada's Food Guide will help: Meet your needs for vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. Reduce your risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, certain types of cancer and osteoporosis. Contribute to your overall health and vitality. The information you provide through this survey is collected under the authority of the Department of Employment and Social Development Act (DESDA) for the purpose of measuring the performance of Canada.ca and continually improving the website. Your participation is voluntary. Please do not include sensitive personal information in the message box, such as your name, address, Social Insurance Number, personal finances, medical or work history or any other information by which you or anyone else can be identified by your comments or views. Any personal information collected will be administered in accordance with the Department of Employment and Social Development Act , the Privacy Act and other applicable privacy laws governing the protection of personal information under the control of the Department of Employment and Social Development. Survey responses will not be attributed to individuals. If you wish to obtain information related to this survey, you may submit a request to the Department of Employment and Social Development pursuant to the Access to Information Act . Instructions for making a request are provided in the publication InfoSource , copies of which are located in local Service Canada Centres. You have the right Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Diabetes is a condition in which your body cannot properly use and store food for energy. The fuel that your body needs is called glucose, a form of sugar. Glucose comes from foods such as fruit, milk, some vegetables, starchy foods and sugar. To control your blood glucose (sugar), you will need to eat healthy foods, be active and you may need to take pills and/or insulin. In the following table, you will find some tips to help you until you see a registered dietitian. Tips for Healthy Eating, Diabetes Prevention and Management Tips Reasons Eat three meals per day at regular times and space meals no more than six hours apart. You may benefit from a healthy snack. Eating at regular times helps your body control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Limit sugars and sweets such as sugar, regular pop, desserts, candies, jam and honey. The more sugar you eat, the higher your blood glucose will be. Artificial sweeteners can be useful. Limit the amount of high-fat food you eat such as fried foods, chips and pastries. High-fat foods may cause you to gain weight. A healthy weight helps with blood glucose (sugar) control and is healthier for your heart. Eat more high-fibre foods such as whole grain breads and cereals, lentils, dried beans and peas, brown rice, vegetables and fruits. Foods high in fibre may help you feel full and may lower blood glucose (sugar) and cholesterol levels. If you are thirsty, drink water. Drinking regular pop and fruit juice will raise your blood glucose (sugar). Add physical activity to your life. Regular physical activity will improve your blood glucose (sugar) control. Plan for healthy eating Using a standard dinner plate, follow the Plate Method in the image below to control your portion sizes. Alcohol can affect blood glucose (sugar) levels and cause you Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cookbook For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Diabetes Cookbook For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Diabetes Cookbook For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet Diabetes Cookbook For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet For the more than two million Canadians who have diabetes, eating a balanced, nutritious diet is an essential part of maintaining good health. If you have diabetes, there are some great Web sites that you can consult for recipes, meal planning suggestions, and nutritional information. You can also follow some helpful tips when preparing food at home or eating out at a restaurant, so that no matter where you are, you can maintain a healthy diet and keep your diabetes in check. Recipe and Nutrition Web Sites for Canadians with Diabetes A number of excellent Web sites provide healthy eating tips and recipes for Canadians with diabetes. Visit the reference links below to find nutritional information and recommendations from The Canadian Diabetes Association, Health Canada, and other reliable sources, and check out the recipe links for lots of healthy diabetes meal planning ideas. Here are some resources for finding information about diabetes and nutrition: The following links take you to Web sites that offer food and diet ideas for healthy living with diabetes: Healthy Eating at Home: Tips for Canadians with Diabetes One of the best ways to manage diabetes is by being conscious of your diet which is a lot easier to do if youre eating your own food at home. Here are some handy tips for keeping your healthy diet on track and in line with the Canadian recommendations when eating and preparing meals at home. Use light mayonnaise instead of margarine or butter on your bread. Just one teaspoon of margarine or butter has 35 calories and a teaspoon of light mayonnaise has 15 calories. If youre going to be adding peanut butter to your toast, dont also use margarine or but Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating Guidelines For Women With Gestational Diabetes

Healthy Eating Guidelines For Women With Gestational Diabetes

Introduction Gestational diabetes (GDM) can happen during pregnancy as hormone levels in your body change. These changes affect how your body manages glucose (sugar). GDM makes it harder for your body to control your blood glucose and increases your risk for type 2 diabetes and other health conditions later in life. Eating a healthy, well balanced diet, managing your weight gain and being physically active can help control your blood glucose and give you and your baby the nutrients you need for a healthy pregnancy. Ask your health care provider to refer you to a diabetes clinic in your community. The dietitian and rest of the health care team will help you to plan a healthy diet that works for you and to have a healthy pregnancy. The information in this handout can help you to get started. Steps You Can Take Eat regular, balanced meals and snacks. Enjoy three meals and three snacks spaced evenly throughout the day. Include at least three food groups in a meal and two food groups for a snack. Eat one of your snacks at bedtime. A balanced diet contains foods with carbohydrates, protein and healthy fats. Carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels. Read on to learn which carbohydrates are the healthiest choices for you. Carbohydrate is found in grain products, fruit and fruit juice, some vegetables, milk and alternatives, dried beans, peas and lentils, and foods such as cakes, cookies, squares, candy and sugary drinks. Choose fibre-rich sources of carbohydrates like whole grain breads and cereals, and dried beans, peas and lentils. Fibre slows carbohydrate absorption into your blood. Choose vegetables and fruit rather than juice. Choose low glycemic index (GI) foods more often. Low GI foods raise blood glucose at a slower rate than high GI foods. See Additional Resources Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating To Manage Or Prevent Diabetes

Healthy Eating To Manage Or Prevent Diabetes

Healthy Eating to Manage or Prevent Diabetes JUST THE BASICS: Tips for Healthy Eating, Diabetes Prevention and Management Healthy Eating to Manage or Prevent Diabetes Have at least 3 out of the 4 food groups from Canadas Food Guide at each meal: Choosing foods from all the food groups ensures that your body gets all the nutrients it needs to be healthy. Eat at least two different kinds of vegetables at each meal. They are high in nutrients and low in calories. Protein could include fish, chicken, lean meats, low-fat cheese, eggs, tofu or legumes such as beans and lentils. Be sure to eat breakfast for a good start to the day. Eat three meals at regular times, four to six hours apart. Eating the right amount at the right time helps keeps your blood glucose in balance. If you will not be at home when it is time to eat, bring healthy foods with you. This provides you with healthy choices, wherever you go. Pack a sandwich. Carry some vegetables or fruit with you. Alcohol can affect blood glucose levels and cause you to gain weight. Talk to your health care team about whether you can drink alcohol and how much is safe. Learn more about alcohol and diabetes . The more sugar you eat or drink, the higher your blood glucose will be. If you are thirsty, drink water. Pop, fruit juice, and sweetened coffee or tea will all raise your blood glucose. Limit sweets such as desserts, candies, jam, and honey. To complete your meal, have milk or yogurt and a piece of fruit. Artificial sweeteners can be safe in small amounts. Learn more about artificial sweeteners . It is very important to control portion sizes when you eat starchy foods, such as breads, cereals, rice, noodles, pasta and potatoes. These foods break down into glucose. High-fat foods cause weight gain. A healthy weight is eas Continue reading >>

Healthy Food Choices

Healthy Food Choices

When diagnosed with diabetes, was one of your first thoughts that youd never be allowed to have sweets again? If so, youre not alone! The thought that diabetes means you have to eliminate your favourite foods especially the sugary ones can stop you in your tracks and keep you from learning about healthy food choices. Fortunately, foods containing sugar can be part of a healthy meal or snack. Moderation is the key. A diabetes diet is actually a healthy approach to eating that would be beneficial for anyone who is concerned about his or her health. Today, much of the focus in choosing meals revolves around balancing the four food groups and controlling portion sizes. Whether you have diabetes or not, the best approach for healthy nutrition is to follow Canadas Guide for Healthy Eating. Eat a variety of foods as outlined in this food guide. Have whole grain cereals and, breads, fruits and vegetables more often. Choose dairy products that are lower fat, lean meats and foods prepared with little or no fat. Achieve a healthy body weight through physical activity and healthy eating. As they say, too much of a good thing is not always a good thing. A simple approach to keeping an eye on portions and making sure you have a variety of food is to use the plate method. It is easy and can help you manage any meal, anywhere. First, divide your plate in half. Fill one half with vegetables, preferably with more than one colour. Divide the remaining half into two, fill one quarter with potatoes/rice/pasta or bread, and the remaining quarter with meat or meat alternative. Add a fruit and a serving of milk and you are on your way to healthy portions and balanced meals. Our bodies need a little fat every day. It is an essential part of our diet. Fats are a source of energy and also serve Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Plans: Control Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Meal Plans: Control Type 2 Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, diabetes meal planning can bring real health benefits and reduce your symptoms. This diet for diabetes is designed to let you to take pleasure in eating while ensuring optimal control of blood glucose, blood pressure and blood lipid levels (cholesterol and triglycerides). It will also help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight. Our Diabetic Meal Plans were the subject of an independent clinical study by McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, which tested the meal plans for 18 months with patients who have type 2 diabetes. If you have gestational diabetes, our Pregnancy Meal Plans can provide you with a gestational diabetes diet. Health: OPTIMISED Continue reading >>

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates Blood glucose is affected most by carbohydrates. And insulin dosing is typically based on food intake, especially carbohydrates. Knowing what foods contain carbohydrates and the amount of carbohydrates in a meal is helpful for blood glucose control. You should aim to include carbohydrates in each meal. Carbohydrate sources like vegetables, fruits and whole grains (high fiber) are preferred over carbohydrate sources with added fats, sugars and salt. Proteins are a necessary part of a balanced diet and can keep you from feeling hungry. They also do not raise your blood glucose like carbohydrates. However, to prevent weight gain, use portion control with proteins. In people with Type 2 diabetes, protein makes insulin work faster, so it may not be a good idea to treat low blood sugar with protein shakes or mixes. Fats Fats are a necessary part of a balanced diet, especially healthy fats like olive oil and fatty fish. The five food groups Some people believe that a diabetes diagnosis means “goodbye” to good food. Not so. Having diabetes does not mean that you can no longer enjoy good food, or that you have to give up your favorite foods. Living with diabetes means eating regular, healthy meals from the following five food groups: Grains and starches Vegetables Fruits Milk & alternatives Meat & alternatives Making healthy food choices Your dietitian or diabetes educator can help you to develop an eating plan that is right for you and fits into your lifestyle. Here are some guidelines for healthy eating: Healthy eating for diabetes is healthy eating for the whole family. Enjoy having regular meals, starting with breakfast first, then lunch and dinner. Space meals no more than 6 hours apart. Eat a variety of foods in each meal, including healthy fats, lean mea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Canada 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines Option Of A Low Carb Diet

Diabetes Canada 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines Option Of A Low Carb Diet

Diabetes Canada 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines option of a low carb diet Diabetes Canada has released their long-awaited 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines [1] in which they say that nutrition therapy is an integral part of peoples self-management of Diabetes, as well as part of treatment for the disease. They emphasized that one of the main goals of nutrition therapy is to maintain or improve the quality of life and nutritional and physical health of those with the disease, while preventing the need to treat both sudden (acute) and long term complications.They said that effective nutrition therapycan improve blood sugar control, including reducing three-month average blood glucose (i.e. HbA1C, glycated hemoglobin)by 1.0% to 2.0%. Diabetes Canada 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines The Guidelines highlighted that since Canada has wide ethnic and cultural diversity, with each group having their distinct foods, preparation methods, and dietary patterns and lifestyles, effective nutritional therapy needs to take these cultural variations into account. They also emphasized that nutrition therapy needs to be individualized;specific to the individual, their age, the duration theyve had type 2 diabetes, their goals, personal values and preferences, along with their individual need, lifestyle and economic situation. Diabetes Canada recognizes that nutrition therapy for those with Diabetes is not one-size-fits-all. Nutrition therapy should be individualized, regularly evaluated,reinforced in an intensive manner and should incorporateself-management education. A registered dietitian (RD)should be involved in the delivery of care wherever possible. The authors mention at the beginning of the Nutrition Therapy Guidelines that; The starting point of nutrition therapy is to follow t Continue reading >>

Canada's Food Guide First Nations, Inuit And Mtis[edit]

Canada's Food Guide First Nations, Inuit And Mtis[edit]

Wikinews has related news: New edition of Canada's Food Guide released Canada's Food Guide is a nutrition guide produced by Health Canada . It is the second most requested Canadian government publication behind the Income Tax Forms. [1] The Health Canada website states: "The overall purpose of dietary guidance is to identify and promote a pattern of eating that meets nutrient needs and reduces the risk of nutrition-related chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease." Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide was developed for Canadians and is accessible for all Canadians. It includes guidelines for eating the right food groups, specified by age group and gender. There are also tips for which foods to choose, the servings size of each food and the best cooking methods. Also included are tips for maintaining a healthy lifestyle and body weight with physical activity. Canada's first food guide was introduced in July 1942 to provide guidance to Canadians on proper nutrition during a period of time when wartime rations were common. The 1942 version was called the Official Food Rules. In 1944 the guide was revised and renamed Canada's Food Rules. In 1962, the guidelines were revised and renamed to Canada's Food Guide. [2] Any foods not accurately described by these food groups are deemed "other" and are advised to be consumed in moderation. The Vegetable and Fruit arc on the Canada's Food Guide label is the largest, [3] and individuals are advised that most of their food consumption be from this food group. Vegetables and fruits are known to contain many beneficial substances such as flavonoids , which may help remove carcinogens from the body, as well as antioxidants such as vitamin C and beta carotene , which help prevent oxidation damage by f Continue reading >>

Diabetes Resources & Information

Diabetes Resources & Information

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) CANRISK Resources As part of the Strategy, the Canadian Pharmacists Journal (CPJ) developed the first set of diabetes practice guidelines specifically for pharmacists, based on the Canadian Diabetes Association's 2008 Clinical Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada. This CPJ supplement, titled Diabetes , was distributed with the March/April 2009 issue of the journal and contains a summary of recommendations for pharmacists in the management and follow-up of patients with this chronic disease. CPhA and the Canadian Diabetes Association joint documents Conseils sur l'utilisation de la Trousse de l'ACD pour la prvention et la gestion du diabte dans votre pratique de la pharmacie The Canadian Optimal Medication Prescribing and Utilization Service (COMPUS), a directorate of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH), is a collaborative, pan-Canadian service funded by Health Canada. In partnership with the federal, provincial, and territorial Ministries of Health, COMPUS identifies and promotes optimal drug therapy. Strategies, tools, and services are provided to encourage the use of evidence-based clinical and cost-effectiveness information in decision making among health care providers and consumers. COMPUS has examined evidence and utilization of insulin analogues and has released recommendations on their use. These documents will be helpful to pharmacists to understand the reasons for differences in recommendations between COMPUS and the CDA. Additional work by COMPUS is examining evidence and utilization of blood glucose test strips. Continue reading >>

The Current Health Crisis And Canadas Food Guide

The Current Health Crisis And Canadas Food Guide

The current health crisis and Canadas food guide December 20 2017 by Dr. Evelyne Bourdua-Roy, MD in Diabetes , Failed low-fat diets , Heart disease , The food revolution , The obesity epidemic Nutrition is an emotionally-charged topic. It seems as though there are daily online battles about the best way to eat, each side fervently defending their position. News outlets often report findings of studies but are not always accurate. Anyone can offer dietary advice online. Low-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets have been quite popular in the news lately, and not surprisingly, are stirring up controversy. Why should Canadians pay attention to them, and what does this have to do with our own dietary guidelines? We will address these questions. First, though, we must discuss the nutritional health crisis facing our nation. Forty years ago, our government told us to eat less fat and more carbohydrates because they believed dietary fat caused heart disease. Tragically, we have seen an unprecedented and frightening increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and other nutritional diseases since then. According to the World Health Organization , worldwide obesity has tripled since 1975, and childhood obesity has increased 10-fold in the same time period. In todays food environment, it is expected that 70% of all Canadian adults will be either overweight or obese by 2040, and a full 5 in 10 children will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. What is even more shocking is that 80% of First Nations children in Canada will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. This crisis is not just limited to obesity and type 2 diabetes. In 2015, we saw levels of coronary heart disease that were actually projected for 2030, in large part attributable to sugar intake. Coronary hea Continue reading >>

Your Guide To Diabetes

Your Guide To Diabetes

Table of Contents To promote and protect the health of Canadians through leadership, partnership, innovation and action in public health. —Public Health Agency of Canada Your Guide to Diabetes Diabetes affects roughly two and a half million Canadians. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to many serious complications, including: heart disease, kidney disease, vision loss, and lower limb amputation. The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) estimates that 5 million Canadians over the age of 20 are currently pre-diabetic. An additional 1 million new cases of pre-diabetes are expected by 2016. Pre-diabetes is a key risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and if left untreated more than half of the people with pre-diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 8 to 10 years. Although diabetes can lead to serious complications and premature death, there are steps that can be taken to prevent or control the disease and lower the risk of complications. This guide is intended to help you understand diabetes, how certain types can be prevented or managed, and how to live with the condition. Did You Know? You may be pre-diabetic and not know it. Pre-diabetes occurs when blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough to diagnose diabetes. Talk to your health care provider to learn more. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that results from the body's inability to sufficiently produce and/or properly use insulin, a hormone that regulates the way glucose (sugar) is stored and used in the body. The body needs insulin to use sugar as an energy source. There are several forms of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. What is pre-diabetes? Pre-diabetes occurs when blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal, but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Glucos Continue reading >>

The New Canada Food Guide

The New Canada Food Guide

Correspondence: Canadian Paediatric Society, 2305 St Laurent Boulevard, Ottawa, Ontario K1G 4J8. Telephone 613-526-9397, fax 613-526-3332, Web sites www.cps.ca , www.caringforkids.cps.ca Cet article est disponible en franais. Voyez " Le nouveau guide alimentaire canadien ". Canadas Food Guide has helped Canadians make healthy food choices for 65 years. Health Canada has been working for the past three years to provide a revised version of this important resource. Comments from dietitians, physicians, scientists and experts in public health have been obtained to give the population a Food Guide based on the latest scientific advances in terms of nutrition and disease prevention. The new Food Guide provides Canadians with recommendations on the type and the amount of food an individual should consume every day according to age and sex. It also includes advice on physical activity needed for health. What are the major differences between the 1992 Food Guide and the new Food Guide? While it is still a rainbow, the first thing that strikes the eye is that the Vegetables and Fruit group is now at the outer part of the rainbow to reflect the importance of vegetables and fruits as part of a healthy eating pattern. The 1992 Food Guide gave general information concerning the number of servings from each food group, stating that Canadians should consume five to 12 portions of grain products, five to 10 portions of vegetables and fruits, and two to three portions of meat and alternatives per day. It gave age-specific recommendations only for milk products. The new Food Guide gives recommendations on the number of servings according to age group, and now includes information on the number of servings required by children two to three years of age. For teenagers and adults, the reco Continue reading >>

Food And Meal Planning For Diabetes

Food And Meal Planning For Diabetes

At Home Blog Food and Meal Planning for Diabetes Log in or register to post comments Print If you have type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes , you may be aware that healthy food choices can help your body control blood glucose (sugar) levels. But how do you do that? Bread, pasta, rice, milk, yogurt, fruits and starchy vegetables (like potatoes, corn and yams) are examples of foods that contain carbohydrate. Carbohydrate is an important nutrient for your body. It gives you the energy ( calories ) that you need to function. Fibre , starch and sugars are the main kinds of carbohydrates. Starches and sugars will raise your blood glucose. Fibre will not. The foods you choose, your meal timing and portion sizes will affect your blood glucose. Spreading carbohydrate containing foods evenly throughout the day helps keep your blood glucose at a consistent level. Here are some tips for choosing foods with carbohydrates: Choose higher fibre foods: whole grain foods and plant-based foods (like beans, lentils, nuts and seeds) have more fibre which helps you feel full longer, manage your weight and keep your bowel movements regular . The Canadian Diabetes Association recommends that adults have 25 to 50 grams of fibre each day. Recent surveys show that Canadian adults typically consume about 14 grams of fibre each day. Click here for a list of fibre rich foods to include in your diet. Choose lower glycemic index (GI) foods: the GI is a rating of how much a carbohydrate rich food will raise your blood glucose. The GI scale ranges from 1 to 100. The higher the number, the faster a food will raise your blood glucose. White bread or pure glucose has a rating of 100. Meat and fats dont contain any carbohydrates, so they dont have a GI rating. Vegetables (except corn, potatoes and yams), most f Continue reading >>

More in diabetes