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Diabetes Finger Prick Device

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Prick

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Prick

(CBS) -- U.S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that does not need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. Though keeping an eye on blood sugar levels is needed to manage insulin, many people are wary of monitoring it because of the pain and cost of current testing methods. The new model, Abbott's new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday. Users wave a reader device over a small sensor attached to the upper arm to see current blood sugar levels and changes over the last eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans diagnosed with diabetes use standard glucose monitors which require multiple finger pricks every day. Abbott's device was approved for adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and should be available in pharmacies within months. The company did not release information on the price of the product. The device can't be used with an insulin pump, but the company is planning improvements that will allow that. "The pros of the new device are that it is a 10-day wear, it is low-profile and that no calibration needed," said Dr. Carol Levy, director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center in New York City. "The cons of the device are that is has no alerts for either high or low BG levels for patients with hypo-unawareness, which could be a challenge. It also requires a separate receiver to view data -- other systems on the market can have data viewed on the smart phone." Continue reading >>

Fda Approves 1st Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Fda Approves 1st Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Federal regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn't need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The discomfort of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies can discourage people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar. Abbott's new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. The Food and Drug Administration approved the device Wednesday. Abbott isn't disclosing the price for the reader or the sensors, which should be available in pharmacies within months. Continue reading >>

An Overview Of Blood Glucose Testing Devices

An Overview Of Blood Glucose Testing Devices

There is a LOT OF TALK in the diabetes community especially amongst those with type 1 diabetes about different methods of checking blood glucose levels. We provide a brief outline below on the 4 main approaches. For a deeper insight, visit our FIRST, the traditionally finger prick blood glucose monitoring system measures the level of glucose in your blood on one particular occasion. This may help to keep blood glucose levels under control and make adjustments to diet, activity or adjust diabetes medication doses. Think of this as a spot check of your watch in order to know what time it is right now SECONDLY, the laboratory or finger prick test of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), provides an overall picture of what the average blood glucose levels have been over the past 10 to 12 weeks. This may help identify if the lifestyle and dietary changes you have made along with medications have succeeded in keeping blood glucose levels under control. Think of this as looking back over sales figures and seeing if the new sales and promotional efforts you are making have affected your sales levels MORE RECENTLY, the continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices which consists of a small 3-5 day disposable sensor inserted into the skin which is attached to a transmitter that sends results to a receiver. The wireless transmission is ongoing. This receiver displays the results either real time or you can download the results later. If it is a real-time CGM – you can see what your blood glucose levels are any time you look at the receiver and you can react accordingly. If it is downloadable later, you can see retrospectively what the results were like for each 5 minutes of the day (288 results). CGM helps a person to interpret how much time their glucose levels are at, above or below tar Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Tips For Making Daily Glucose Tests Easier

Gestational Diabetes: Tips For Making Daily Glucose Tests Easier

I have gestational diabetes. Now what? If your doctor has diagnosed you with gestational diabetes, you've already undergone some tests to check your blood sugar (or glucose) levels. Having gestational diabetes means that your blood sugar levels are too high. Gestational diabetes (along with high blood pressure, or hypertension) is one of the most common illnesses during pregnancy. Although the thought of having gestational diabetes may scare you at first, in most cases it's easily treated. At first your doctor will probably try to have you control your diabetes with a special diet. You'll have to avoid certain types of food that can cause your blood glucose levels to rise too high. You'll also need to eat less of certain foods, keep track of the time between meals, and measure your blood sugar regularly. If you can't control your glucose levels with this regimen, your doctor may prescribe insulin, which can either be injected or taken as a pill. Checking your blood sugar If you need to check your blood sugar levels at home, you can do so with a home glucose testing kit. Several types are available, but all kits have a device for drawing blood, digital measuring device, and a test strip. To get a small blood sample, you prick the end of your finger with a lancet designed to penetrate the skin only as far as needed to draw a drop of blood. This can be uncomfortable for some people, especially those who have to do the test three to six times a day. After pricking your finger, you put a small amount of blood on the strip and place the strip into the measuring device. The meter displays the blood glucose level in about 30 seconds. In most cases, blood sugar levels have to be measured after each meal, but your doctor may tell you that you need to do the test before eating as Continue reading >>

Now, No More Finger Pricking For Diabetics!

Now, No More Finger Pricking For Diabetics!

A new technology developed by an Indian-origin scientist, which uses a laser device may be able to non-invasively monitor blood glucose levels and eliminate the need for daily finger pricking for diabetics. (World Diabetes Day: Can Your Diet Alone Reverse Diabetes?) Currently, many people with diabetes need to measure their blood glucose levels by pricking their fingers, squeezing drops of blood onto test strips, and processing the results with portable glucometers. The new technology, developed by Professor Gin Jose and a team in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Leeds, uses a small device with low-powered lasers to measure blood glucose levels without penetrating the skin. (6 Natural Remedies for Diabetes) It could give people a simpler, pain-free alternative to finger pricking. The technology has continuous monitoring capabilities making it ideal for development as a wearable device. This could help improve the lives of millions of people by enabling them to constantly monitor their glucose levels without the need for an implant. "Unlike the traditional method, this new non-invasive technology can constantly monitor blood glucose levels," Jose said. "As well as being a replacement for finger-prick testing, this technology opens up the potential for people with diabetes to receive continuous readings, meaning they are instantly alerted when intervention is needed. This will allow people to self-regulate and minimise emergency hospital treatment," Jose said. (This is the Main Cause of Rise in Diabetes Cases) At the heart of the new technology is a piece of nano-engineered silica glass with ions that fluoresce in infrared light when a low power laser light hits them. When the glass is in contact with the users' skin, the extent of fluorescence signal varie Continue reading >>

How To Determine Which Gauge To Use For Your Diabetic Lancing Device

How To Determine Which Gauge To Use For Your Diabetic Lancing Device

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), approximately 1.7 million Americans are diagnosed with Diabetes and if current trends remain the same, 1 in 3 Americans will have diabetes by the year 2050. Broken down further, there are approximately 4,657 new diabetic patients diagnosed every day that are having to experience the process of pricking their fingers for the first time in order to read their blood sugar. If you fall under this category, undoubtedly, your doctor has given you instructions on the process and the different products you will become accustomed to such as a blood glucose meter, test strips, lancet pins, control solutions, insulin pumps, and lancets. Yet, many times a Doctor will just give an overview and send a patient on their way with many questions unanswered. Finding tips and tricks to make the process of checking your blood sugar in a quick and accurate manner are important to diabetic patients. Yet, finding ways to reduce the discomfort of pricking the fingers for blood samples is usually on the top of every diabetics patient list. Lancing Devices and Lancets A lancing device is a spring loaded mechanism that, when loaded with a lancet, pricks a finger quickly in order to provide a small sample of blood for the test strip. Most of the lancing devices today are equipped with 2 - 3 depth settings. The higher settings will penetrate deeper while the lower settings are for individuals with thin, sensitive skin such as senior citizens patients and children. The higher settings are for patients who have thick callouses on their skin which will allow the lancet to push through the callouses. The lancet is a sterile grade steel needle encased in a plastic cylinder used to prick the finger. There are 3 common gauges that the needle comes in wh Continue reading >>

Information About Lancets And Lancing Devices

Information About Lancets And Lancing Devices

Choosing a Lancing Device Lancing Devices A lancing device it a tool that holds a lancet needle and is used to draw a tiny amount of blood from the finger or forearm. All lancing devices use some sort of disposal needle, however, some use a single lancet at a time that is changed with each use, while others use drums that contain multiple lancets and rotates automatically after each use. Generic lancing devices can cost as little as five dollars, while “brand” name devices average $25 to $35 per device. Devices generally operate on some sort of spring system. Some use a sliding mechanism, others a twisting mechanism, to “set” the device to be used. Most lancing devices have a button that is pushed that acts like a trigger, releasing and popping the needle forward. All lancing devices should have a depth setting. Those that only offer a single depth will drive the needle deep into the finger and almost always cause more intense pain, especially for children and the elderly who have thinner skin. You can also purchase lancets that are held and manually pressed into the finger to draw blood. These are often cheaper, but also are more painful to use because there is no depth setting to adjust for individual preferences. Lancets A lancet is the needle that is inserted into a lancing device that actually pricks the skin. Lancet devices come in many sizes, styles, and some can be more painful to use than others. All blood glucose monitor kits come with a lancing device but you do not have to use the lancing device that came with your test kit. As long as the lancing device you are using draws sufficient blood for your meter you can use anyone that you want. Tips For Using Your Lancing Device For Finger Pricks All lancing devices are not equal: Generally, the smaller th Continue reading >>

Genteel – The Best Device For Blood Glucose Testing

Genteel – The Best Device For Blood Glucose Testing

One of the cool things about being a diabetes coach is that Cyrus and I get to learn from our clients. New products and innovative ideas are coming into our inbox all the time. In this article, I will tell you about a cool blood glucose testing device that I now use every single day and absolutely love! I vividly remember when our client Tim posted in our private Facebook group about a new device that allows for pain free blood glucose testing! This clearly peaked my interest and I started looking into it right away. If you are living with diabetes, then you know the frustrations around pricking your finger to test your blood glucose. It can be a real pain (pun intended) and anything that can improve that process is quite exciting. So I went to the Genteel website and started watching videos. I was quite intrigued by what I saw. In a nutshell, here's how Genteel works. The lancing device first pricks you gently, then applies a suction to your skin to PULL a small drop of blood out of your skin. Just make sure that you apply the suction for about 5 seconds and watch as a drop of blood magically appears with practically zero discomfort. I swear by this device, and I love how it helps me prick myself without any pain. I’m an Amazon Prime member so I was quite excited to see that I could order it on Amazon and get it the next day! In addition, I was also happy to hear that I could use all the old lancets that I already have at home. Let’s Talk About the Importance of Testing Blood Glucose For those living with insulin-dependent diabetes, it is absolutely essential to test your blood glucose frequently. If you have a CGM, you can test less frequently, but it’s still essential to test multiple times per day. For those living with non-insulin dependent diabetes, the goal Continue reading >>

Blood Lancet

Blood Lancet

Box of disposable lancets. Blood-sampling device with a lancet at the tip. A blood lancet, or simply lancet, is a small medical implement used for capillary blood sampling. A blood lancet is similar to a small scalpel but with a double-edged blade or needle. Lancets are used to make punctures, such as a fingerstick, to obtain small blood specimens. Blood lancets are generally disposable. Lancets are also used to prick the skin in skin testing for allergies.[1] A blood-sampling device, also known as a lancing device, is an instrument equipped with a lancet. It is also most commonly used by diabetics during blood glucose monitoring. The depth of skin penetration can be adjusted for various skin thicknesses. Long lancing devices are used for fetal scalp blood testing to get a measure of the acid base status of the fetus. Blood sampling[edit] Main article: Capillary blood sampling The small capillary blood samples obtained can be tested for blood glucose, hemoglobin, and many other blood components. [edit] External links[edit] Lancet In Diabetes Self Management Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Finger-prick-free Blood Sugar Test For Diabetes Patients

Fda Approves First Finger-prick-free Blood Sugar Test For Diabetes Patients

FDA on Thursday approved Abbott Laboratories' FreeStyle Libre Flash, the first glucose monitoring device to allow diabetes patients in the United States to test their blood sugar without having to prick their fingers. How it works How six hospitals launched diabetes management programs The device is a bottle-cap-sized sensor containing a small wire that is inserted just beneath the skin on the upper arm. Patients can use a hand-held receiver to scan the sensor to check their current glucose levels, as well as trends and patterns. The device does not, however, alert patients of low glucose levels unless the patient uses the hand-held receiver. It also does not communicate with insulin pumps, as other continuous glucose readers do, although Abbott has said that they are working on that functionality. Abbott has not disclosed pricing information for the United States, the device's cost likely will be similar to its pricing in Europe, where it's currently sold for the equivalent of $140 for both the sensor and the reader. The sensor has to be replaced every 10 days, leading to an annual cost of roughly $1,900. Jared Watkin, Abbott senior vice president of diabetes care, said his company is in the process of talking to insurers about covering the device. No more pricking your finger According to analysts from Jefferies, this sensor will be a "game-changer," as it will allow patients to check their blood glucose levels without pricking their finger, something that has been shown to prevent people from testing their blood sugar as frequently as recommended. According to Reuters, diabetes patients typically should measure their glucose levels almost 12 times a day. Studies have shown, however, that the majority of diabetes patients test their glucose levels fewer than three tim Continue reading >>

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

Further proof the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been warming up to modern technology — it has just approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor that doesn’t require the user to prick themselves over and over for a blood sample. Today, the FDA cleared Abbot’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, a device that uses a small sensor wire inserted under the skin to determine glucose levels in adult diabetics. Another wand-like device is then waved over the sensor to measure and give a readout of those glucose levels. This is a milestone move for the FDA as diabetes affects nearly 30 million people in the United States who currently have to test their blood sugar by pricking themselves several times throughout the day and every time they eat. However, the idea for a prickless blood sugar monitor isn’t new. Tech companies have increasingly shown an interest in the massive diabetics market over the past few years. Apple is rumored to be working on such a device and its CEO Tim Cook has even been spotted wearing a possible prototype that could connect to the Apple Watch. Other companies endeavor to build something similar, including Glucowise, which has a device still under development. However, it seems it’s not so easy to create a needleless blood sugar detector. Google tried to build a contact lens that could detect glucose but it seems the project has gone nowhere since drug company Novartis licensed the tech in 2014. Another FDA-approved device for glucose monitoring without the prick called the GlucoWatch was approved in the early 2000’s, but consumers found it cumbersome and it happened to cause a bad rash in some. But there’s new hope today that the Freestyle monitor has worked out all the kinks. The device is intended for those 18 a Continue reading >>

5 Must-have Tools To Measure Your Blood Sugar

5 Must-have Tools To Measure Your Blood Sugar

If you've just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need some supplies to help you manage your blood sugar. These include: Blood Sugar Meter This device, also called a glucose meter or monitor, measures how much sugar (or glucose) is in a drop of your blood. It can tell you when your sugar is too low or too high. Talk to your doctor about what to do in those situations. Glucose meters can also show you how diet, exercise, stress, sickness, and your medications affect blood sugar. “Get the [one] that you feel comfortable and confident using,” says Jane Seley, a diabetes nurse practitioner at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Make sure the screen is large enough to read. And choose a meter that requires less than a microliter blood sample. “It’s much more comfortable,” Seley says. “You don’t have to stick yourself as deep. It’s much easier to be successful, and you won’t waste as many test strips.” Consider a meter that can download your readings to your smartphone, tablet, or computer. “You can see charts of how your blood sugars differ throughout the day,” Seley says. “It helps you make better decisions about things like when to exercise and what to have for breakfast.” Test Strips, Lancets, and Lancet Device Each small plastic strip contains chemicals that convert the sugar in your blood into an electric current that your meter can read. Wash your hands first, then put a test strip into your meter. Prick the side of your fingertip with a small needle called a lancet. The lancet fits inside a lancet device. About the shape and size of a pen, it’s spring-loaded to help you prick your finger easily with just the right amount of pressure. You then squeeze a single drop of blood onto the strip, and your meter measures the sugar. If you’r Continue reading >>

Device To Keep Tabs On Blood Sugar Levels Without Finger-pricking Available In Singapore

Device To Keep Tabs On Blood Sugar Levels Without Finger-pricking Available In Singapore

SINGAPORE: When Mr Kevin Lim was diagnosed with diabetes in June last year, the 40-year-old wanted to do all he could to improve his condition. The first step would be to start monitoring his blood glucose levels so he could get a better sense of the severity of his diabetes. With that, however, he faced the inevitable task of pricking his finger almost daily - or so he thought. Through some research, Mr Lim, who works in an innovation lab, discovered a flash glucose monitoring device online that he could buy and use at home that could do away with the need for pricking his fingers. Self-monitoring for diabetes patients typically involves pricking the finger for a drop of blood that has to be transferred onto a test strip and read with a small machine. The flash glucose monitoring device measures the glucose level of tissue fluid through a sensor about the size of an old Singapore 50-cent coin. The sensor is attached to the back of the upper arm by painless self-insertion and an adhesive pad. Readings are made by scanning the sensor with a separate machine. The sensor that can be worn for up to two weeks and holds eight hours of 15-minute glucose readings at any time is water-resistant. Mr Lim ordered it on eBay, but the device, that for a few years has been available in the US and Europe, landed in Singapore in May this year. Advertisement With the device, Mr Lim has been able to observe which foods cause his blood glucose level to spike, which activities help him to maintain a healthy blood sugar level, and whether the medication he was prescribed were effective. In diabetic patients, high blood glucose levels after a meal has been linked to heart disease. The monitoring being more discreet than finger-pricking is something Mr Lim appreciates. “It’s demoralising t Continue reading >>

No More Dreaded Blood Sugar Pricks For Diabetics

No More Dreaded Blood Sugar Pricks For Diabetics

Eventually, people with diabetes won't need to prick their fingers multiple times a day to check their blood sugar levels, if researchers have their way. Sylvia Daunert and her lab team at the University of Miami in Florida are reporting significant progress toward the development of sensors that would continuously monitor blood sugar levels without needing blood samples. The results could even be displayed on a mobile device such as a cell phone. Today, to keep their blood sugar in a safe range, diabetics must monitor those levels with a device that pricks the skin to draw a blood sample for testing. Read: Implantable sensor monitors blood sugar levels in pigs Benefits of the sensors There are two good reasons to improve that method, the researchers say. First, and most obvious, is that a test without drawing blood would be more comfortable. The other is that a biosensor beneath the skin could give continuous updates, rather than spot checks of blood samples. That kind of information would be particularly helpful for monitoring people with diabetes who are critically ill, or undergoing surgery, the research team points out in the journal ACS Chemical Biology. "Currently there are no devices that are able to monitor glucose continuously for long periods of time. Our designer glucose sensing peptides will allow (us) to achieve continuous monitoring," Daunert told Reuters Health by email. How the sensor works To build a sensor, Daunert and her team modified a protein to allow it to bind very tightly to glucose. They also made the protein fluorescent and gave it the ability to give off a signal when it binds to glucose: the fluorescence weakens, and the protein darkens. That signal - the intensity of the fluorescence - "can be measured by a portable meter and the response Continue reading >>

No More Finger Prick. New Technology May Help With Diabetes Management.

No More Finger Prick. New Technology May Help With Diabetes Management.

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes technology and medications have come a long way since the invention of insulin in 1921. But day-to-day management still requires countless finger pricks to draw blood and measure glucose levels. FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, manufactured by Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. and officially approved on September 27 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), strives to be a true game-changer for people with diabetes. Unlike the Dexcom or Medtronic’s Guardian and Enlite continuous glucose monitors (CGM), which require a minimum of twice-daily finger pricks to calibrate the CGM’s readings with that of a traditional blood glucometer, the Libre system requires zero calibration. The technology is still similar in that the Libre also uses a small sensor wire that a patient inserts into their subcutaneous tissue. This sensor measures glucose levels in the interstitial (body fat) fluid versus glucose in the bloodstream. How the device works Where the technology continues to differ greatly is in how the glucose levels measured by the sensor wire are then reported to the person using it. From the get-go, the Libre requires a lengthy 12-hour startup period before the sensor is able to measure and report glucose levels while the Dexcom and Medtronic sensors startup window is a mere two hours. The most significant difference between these technologies is that the Libre isn’t “continuous.” When a patient wants to measure their blood glucose level, the Libre requires them to wave a small handheld “mobile reader” over the part of the body where their sensor is located. The handheld device then displays the glucose level, allowing the user to determine if it’s too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). Dexcom and Medtronic Continue reading >>

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