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Diabetes Finger Prick Device

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor For Diabetics That Doesn't Need A Finger Prick

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor For Diabetics That Doesn't Need A Finger Prick

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved Abbott Laboratories' glucose monitoring device for adults with diabetes, allowing millions of people to track their blood sugar levels without having to prick their fingers. Abbott's FreeStyle Libre Flash reduces the need for fingerstick testing, which is painful and inconvenient, by using a small sensor wire in a 'sticker' that is inserted below the skin to continuously measure and monitor glucose levels. People with diabetes must regularly test and monitor their blood sugar to make sure it is at an appropriate level, which is often done multiple times per day by taking a fingerstick sample and testing it with a blood glucose meter. Scroll down for video According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes. People with diabetes either do not make enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). When the body doesn't have enough insulin or cannot use it effectively, sugar builds up in the blood. High blood sugar levels can lead to heart disease; stroke; blindness; kidney failure; and amputation of toes, feet or legs. The device can be worn for up to 10 days. 'The FDA is always interested in new technologies that can help make the care of people living with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, easier and more manageable,' said Donald St. Pierre, acting director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health and deputy director of new product evaluation in the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. 'This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabete Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Tips For Making Daily Glucose Tests Easier

Gestational Diabetes: Tips For Making Daily Glucose Tests Easier

I have gestational diabetes. Now what? If your doctor has diagnosed you with gestational diabetes, you've already undergone some tests to check your blood sugar (or glucose) levels. Having gestational diabetes means that your blood sugar levels are too high. Gestational diabetes (along with high blood pressure, or hypertension) is one of the most common illnesses during pregnancy. Although the thought of having gestational diabetes may scare you at first, in most cases it's easily treated. At first your doctor will probably try to have you control your diabetes with a special diet. You'll have to avoid certain types of food that can cause your blood glucose levels to rise too high. You'll also need to eat less of certain foods, keep track of the time between meals, and measure your blood sugar regularly. If you can't control your glucose levels with this regimen, your doctor may prescribe insulin, which can either be injected or taken as a pill. Checking your blood sugar If you need to check your blood sugar levels at home, you can do so with a home glucose testing kit. Several types are available, but all kits have a device for drawing blood, digital measuring device, and a test strip. To get a small blood sample, you prick the end of your finger with a lancet designed to penetrate the skin only as far as needed to draw a drop of blood. This can be uncomfortable for some people, especially those who have to do the test three to six times a day. After pricking your finger, you put a small amount of blood on the strip and place the strip into the measuring device. The meter displays the blood glucose level in about 30 seconds. In most cases, blood sugar levels have to be measured after each meal, but your doctor may tell you that you need to do the test before eating as Continue reading >>

Fda Approves A Blood Glucose Monitoring Device That Doesn’t Require Finger Pricks

Fda Approves A Blood Glucose Monitoring Device That Doesn’t Require Finger Pricks

The U.S. FDA announced it approves the glucose monitoring device by Abbott Laboratories, aimed for adults with diabetes. This device allows millions of people with diabetes check their blood glucose levels without pricking their fingers. The name of the product is FreeStyle Libre Flash. What it does is reducing the need for the painful and inconvenient fingerstick testing by inserting a small sensor wire below the surface of the skin. This wire measures and monitors blood sugar levels continuously. You can wear the device on the back of the upper arm for up to ten days if you are 18 years of age or older. Vicky Assardo, the Abbott spokeswoman, says the launching of the product will probably be before the end of the year. So, they won’t disclose information about the price until then, even though according to Assardo it’ll be around $69, which is the price in Europe. Also, each 14-day lasting sensor will be around $69, that is, before insurance. However, the sensor will last for 10 days in the U.S. The senior vice president of Abbott’s diabetes care says the aim to make the device as affordable as possible. Comparison with the Standard Diabetes Devices Back in the days, people with diabetes measured their blood sugar levels almost a dozen times a day by pricking their fingers. Today, Medtronic Plc’s iPRO2 Professional, DexCom Inc’s G5 Mobile, and other advanced continuous glucose monitoring devices have sensors to measure glucose readings. But, they still need fingertip testing 2-4 times daily for maximum accuracy. What’s more, most people with diabetes do not measure their blood sugar as often as they should. This is due to the discomfort and pain caused by these tests. According to Abbott, most diabetes patients test blood sugar levels less than 3 times dai Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar Testing Important?

Why Is Blood Sugar Testing Important?

Measuring blood sugar (glucose) levels at home has become a cornerstone of diabetes care. Measuring blood sugar regularly can: Help you know if your blood sugar is within your target range. Staying in a healthy range can help prevent or delay the long-term complications of high blood sugar, such as heart, kidney, eye, nerve, and circulation problems Help you know if your blood sugar is too low or too high and treatment is needed Help you know how much and which type of medicine to use Prevent low blood sugar at night Help you manage illness at home Let you know if you need to do a ketone test (if you have type 1 diabetes) Help you understand the effects of certain foods, exercise, and stress on your blood sugar Help your healthcare provider know if changes in your treatment are needed What supplies are needed? Doing a blood test requires: Finger-pricking (lancing) device: A finger-pricking device (called a lancet) is used to get a drop of blood for the test. The lancet can often be set at different depths for different people. Adjustable lancets are good for young children and tender skin and for when you do not need the lancet to go deep. Remember to change the lancet every day. A sharp and clean lancet helps prevent injury and infection. Blood glucose meter (glucometer): Most people use blood glucose meters to test blood sugar. Not all meters measure in the same way, so the results from different meters are not always the same. It doesn't matter which type of meter you choose as long as you always use the same meter. Bring the meter to each clinic visit. Your healthcare provider can get a record of the test results from the meter. Some features to look for in a meter include: Accuracy: Make sure the meter is accurate in the environment where you live, for example, in Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

Blood Lancet

Blood Lancet

Box of disposable lancets. Blood-sampling device with a lancet at the tip. A blood lancet, or simply lancet, is a small medical implement used for capillary blood sampling. A blood lancet is similar to a small scalpel but with a double-edged blade or needle. Lancets are used to make punctures, such as a fingerstick, to obtain small blood specimens. Blood lancets are generally disposable. Lancets are also used to prick the skin in skin testing for allergies.[1] A blood-sampling device, also known as a lancing device, is an instrument equipped with a lancet. It is also most commonly used by diabetics during blood glucose monitoring. The depth of skin penetration can be adjusted for various skin thicknesses. Long lancing devices are used for fetal scalp blood testing to get a measure of the acid base status of the fetus. Blood sampling[edit] Main article: Capillary blood sampling The small capillary blood samples obtained can be tested for blood glucose, hemoglobin, and many other blood components. [edit] External links[edit] Lancet In Diabetes Self Management Continue reading >>

Diabetics Can Now Test Their Blood Sugar Levels With A Mobile Device

Diabetics Can Now Test Their Blood Sugar Levels With A Mobile Device

People living with diabetes have to prick their fingers to check their blood sugar levels anywhere from one to seven times a day. But now, there’s a better way to monitor blood sugar. This week, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first at-home, needleless system for continuously monitoring glucose for people with diabetes. The system, called FreeStyle Libre Flash, and manufactured by the DC-based Abbott Laboratories, allows users to forgo finger-pricking for up to 10 days at a time. The Flash is essentially a small, circular plastic sensor that sits on top of the skin and detects blood sugar from a small wire that goes under the skin beneath the sensor. People can insert themselves using an applicator that works sort of like a rubber stamp. Once people have applied the sensor on their arms, they can wave a mobile device a little smaller than a smartphone in front of it to read glucose levels. It takes about 12 hours for the wire to become adjusted to the person’s body, but afterward the device takes continuous data that tracks blood sugar over time for over a week. Afterward, you peel the sensor off slowly, and apply a new one. Ideally, this would encourage people with diabetes to check their blood sugar more routinely, Jared Watkin, senior vice president of Abbott’s Diabetes Care unit, told Reuters. Often, people will forgo checking their sugar levels as often as they should because finger pricking can be such a nuisance. Right now it’s only marketed for adults, but the company hopes to receive approval for children under 18 as well. Abbott already has one needle-free blood sugar monitoring system available for the public called the FreeStyle Libre Pro. However, users have to make a special trip to the doctor’s office to have the wire placed und Continue reading >>

Fda Oks Device With No Finger-prick For Diabetes

Fda Oks Device With No Finger-prick For Diabetes

HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The first fingerstick-free blood sugar monitoring system for adults with diabetes has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System features a small sensor wire that's placed below the skin's surface and continuously monitors blood sugar (glucose) levels. People with diabetes can wave a mobile reader above the sensor wire to check their glucose levels. The system is approved for use in people with diabetes aged 18 and older. After a 12-hour start-up period, it can be worn for up to 10 days, the FDA said. "This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes -- with a wave of the mobile reader," Donald St. Pierre said in an FDA news release. He is deputy director of new product evaluation in the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Approval of the system, made by Abbott Diabetes Care, was based on a clinical trial of diabetes patients aged 18 and older. The system does not provide real-time alerts on its own, the FDA noted. For example, it cannot warn patients about low blood glucose levels while they're sleeping. Potential risks associated with the system include low or high blood sugar if data it provides is inaccurate and used to make treatment decisions, the FDA said. Some patients may also have mild skin irritation around the area where the sensor wire is inserted. More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People with diabetes either don't make enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot use insulin pr Continue reading >>

Device To Keep Tabs On Blood Sugar Levels Without Finger-pricking Available In Singapore

Device To Keep Tabs On Blood Sugar Levels Without Finger-pricking Available In Singapore

SINGAPORE: When Mr Kevin Lim was diagnosed with diabetes in June last year, the 40-year-old wanted to do all he could to improve his condition. The first step would be to start monitoring his blood glucose levels so he could get a better sense of the severity of his diabetes. With that, however, he faced the inevitable task of pricking his finger almost daily - or so he thought. Through some research, Mr Lim, who works in an innovation lab, discovered a flash glucose monitoring device online that he could buy and use at home that could do away with the need for pricking his fingers. Self-monitoring for diabetes patients typically involves pricking the finger for a drop of blood that has to be transferred onto a test strip and read with a small machine. The flash glucose monitoring device measures the glucose level of tissue fluid through a sensor about the size of an old Singapore 50-cent coin. The sensor is attached to the back of the upper arm by painless self-insertion and an adhesive pad. Readings are made by scanning the sensor with a separate machine. The sensor that can be worn for up to two weeks and holds eight hours of 15-minute glucose readings at any time is water-resistant. Mr Lim ordered it on eBay, but the device, that for a few years has been available in the US and Europe, landed in Singapore in May this year. Advertisement With the device, Mr Lim has been able to observe which foods cause his blood glucose level to spike, which activities help him to maintain a healthy blood sugar level, and whether the medication he was prescribed were effective. In diabetic patients, high blood glucose levels after a meal has been linked to heart disease. The monitoring being more discreet than finger-pricking is something Mr Lim appreciates. “It’s demoralising t Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Diabetics who don’t like pricking their fingers to monitor blood sugar may have an alternative method to check their levels. Federal regulators have approved the first continuous device that will bypass the finger prick tests, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice a day. Abbott's new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, approved Wednesday by the FDA, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. “The FDA is always interested in new technologies that can help make the care of people living with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, easier and more manageable,” said Donald St. Pierre, acting director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health and deputy director of new product evaluation in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes — with a wave of the mobile reader.” Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. Abbott's device was approved for adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and should be available in pharmacies within months, according to The Associated Press. The company, based near Chicago, did not disclose the price of the reader or the sensors. Continue reading >>

Israeli Device Banishes Finger-pricking For Sugar Levels In Diabetes Patients

Israeli Device Banishes Finger-pricking For Sugar Levels In Diabetes Patients

Diabetes patients know that one of the greatest challenges in managing the ailment is tracking their blood sugar, or glucose, levels. To do that the only option available today is through the use of standard glucose meters — devices that require multiple finger pricks each day, a painful process. For years, researchers have been trying to find a noninvasive, quicker and easier way to monitor blood glucose. Even the most advanced devices in use today, like needle sensors, which can track glucose continuously, need to be inserted under the skin every one to two weeks. Free Sign Up Now, Caesarea-based startup Cnoga Medical Ltd. says it has come up with a way to track blood glucose levels without pricking or pain. Its glucose meter, already approved for use in numerous countries worldwide, uses a camera to provide a diagnosis of blood glucose levels by observing the changing colors of the user’s finger. During a short training period, the device learns to correlate the user’s skin tone with previous glucose level readings. The technology got the green light on Monday from one of the world’s leading diabetes specialists, Prof. Andreas Pfützner, MD, PhD, who came to Israel to present the company with his findings after having tested the technology in two clinical studies in Germany. “The results were surprising,” he told The Times of Israel in a phone interview. Pfützner held two clinical trials at his institute to validate the performance of the technology, and in both studies he found that the medical device performed “with a surprising level of accuracy,” the same as that of needle sensors. “Cnoga achieved the same level of monitoring as the invasive devices,” he said. “I have not seen this before,” he said. “It is a wonderful device” and a Continue reading >>

Brainstorm Health: Abbott Finger Prick-less Device, Marijuana Drug Trial, Tom Price's Flights

Brainstorm Health: Abbott Finger Prick-less Device, Marijuana Drug Trial, Tom Price's Flights

Greetings, readers! This is Sy. In a milestone for Americans with diabetes, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the first-ever continuous blood sugar monitoring device that doesn’t require patients to take potentially painful and invasive blood tests that require pricking their fingertips to collect samples. The approval was granted to Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. The device, Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, is approved for adult diabetes patients 18 years of age and older, and the approval sent Abbott stock up 3.5% in Thursday trading. It slashes the need for the so-called fingerstick tests that people with diabetes regularly endure to figure out whether their blood sugar levels are too high or too low, and to monitor general fluctuation in blood glucose so they can adjust their diets or medication. The device itself uses an under-the-skin sensor wire which keeps tabs on sugar levels. In order to get a gauge on where those glucose levels are at, users simply have to wave an accompanying, specialized mobile reader device over the sensor like a wand. “The FDA is always interested in new technologies that can help make the care of people living with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, easier and more manageable,” said the FDA’s Donald St. Pierre in a statement. “This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes—with a wave of the mobile reader.” Medical device and tech companies alike have shown growing interest in diabetes management and monitoring devices. Last year, the FDA approved an artificial pancreas from device giant Medtronic to treat people with type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

5 Must-have Tools To Measure Your Blood Sugar

5 Must-have Tools To Measure Your Blood Sugar

If you've just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need some supplies to help you manage your blood sugar. These include: Blood Sugar Meter This device, also called a glucose meter or monitor, measures how much sugar (or glucose) is in a drop of your blood. It can tell you when your sugar is too low or too high. Talk to your doctor about what to do in those situations. Glucose meters can also show you how diet, exercise, stress, sickness, and your medications affect blood sugar. “Get the [one] that you feel comfortable and confident using,” says Jane Seley, a diabetes nurse practitioner at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Make sure the screen is large enough to read. And choose a meter that requires less than a microliter blood sample. “It’s much more comfortable,” Seley says. “You don’t have to stick yourself as deep. It’s much easier to be successful, and you won’t waste as many test strips.” Consider a meter that can download your readings to your smartphone, tablet, or computer. “You can see charts of how your blood sugars differ throughout the day,” Seley says. “It helps you make better decisions about things like when to exercise and what to have for breakfast.” Test Strips, Lancets, and Lancet Device Each small plastic strip contains chemicals that convert the sugar in your blood into an electric current that your meter can read. Wash your hands first, then put a test strip into your meter. Prick the side of your fingertip with a small needle called a lancet. The lancet fits inside a lancet device. About the shape and size of a pen, it’s spring-loaded to help you prick your finger easily with just the right amount of pressure. You then squeeze a single drop of blood onto the strip, and your meter measures the sugar. If you’r Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Prick

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Prick

(CBS) -- U.S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that does not need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. Though keeping an eye on blood sugar levels is needed to manage insulin, many people are wary of monitoring it because of the pain and cost of current testing methods. The new model, Abbott's new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday. Users wave a reader device over a small sensor attached to the upper arm to see current blood sugar levels and changes over the last eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans diagnosed with diabetes use standard glucose monitors which require multiple finger pricks every day. Abbott's device was approved for adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and should be available in pharmacies within months. The company did not release information on the price of the product. The device can't be used with an insulin pump, but the company is planning improvements that will allow that. "The pros of the new device are that it is a 10-day wear, it is low-profile and that no calibration needed," said Dr. Carol Levy, director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center in New York City. "The cons of the device are that is has no alerts for either high or low BG levels for patients with hypo-unawareness, which could be a challenge. It also requires a separate receiver to view data -- other systems on the market can have data viewed on the smart phone." Continue reading >>

No More Finger Prick. New Technology May Help With Diabetes Management.

No More Finger Prick. New Technology May Help With Diabetes Management.

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes technology and medications have come a long way since the invention of insulin in 1921. But day-to-day management still requires countless finger pricks to draw blood and measure glucose levels. FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, manufactured by Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. and officially approved on September 27 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), strives to be a true game-changer for people with diabetes. Unlike the Dexcom or Medtronic’s Guardian and Enlite continuous glucose monitors (CGM), which require a minimum of twice-daily finger pricks to calibrate the CGM’s readings with that of a traditional blood glucometer, the Libre system requires zero calibration. The technology is still similar in that the Libre also uses a small sensor wire that a patient inserts into their subcutaneous tissue. This sensor measures glucose levels in the interstitial (body fat) fluid versus glucose in the bloodstream. How the device works Where the technology continues to differ greatly is in how the glucose levels measured by the sensor wire are then reported to the person using it. From the get-go, the Libre requires a lengthy 12-hour startup period before the sensor is able to measure and report glucose levels while the Dexcom and Medtronic sensors startup window is a mere two hours. The most significant difference between these technologies is that the Libre isn’t “continuous.” When a patient wants to measure their blood glucose level, the Libre requires them to wave a small handheld “mobile reader” over the part of the body where their sensor is located. The handheld device then displays the glucose level, allowing the user to determine if it’s too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). Dexcom and Medtronic Continue reading >>

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