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Diabetes Financial Support

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Diabetes happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to process glucose. Diabetes can often be controlled with treatment -- a combination of medication and diet. As a person gets older, sometimes diabetes can't be controlled, and then it can cause damage to internal organs and other problems. Symptoms and Complications of Adult Diabetes Symptoms of both diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 include frequent urination, unusual thirst and hunger, and extreme fatigue. People with type 2 diabetes also can suffer from tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, frequent infections, and cuts that are slow to heal. Complications from diabetes include: retinopathy (eye and vision problems) nephropathy (kidney disease) neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet or hands that disrupts your ability to stand, walk, or use your hands hypertension (high blood pressure) gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage that interferes with digestion) peripheral arterial disease (reduced blood flow to your limbs) cellulitis (skin infections), and Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have uncontrolled diabetes and you have been prevented from working for at least 12 months, or you expect that you won't be able to work for at least 12 months, then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (SSDI/SSD) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. But to qualify for disability benefits, the damage caused by your diabetes must severely limit what you can do, or you must have complications that fulfill the requirements of one of Social Security's disability listings. If your diabetes is uncontrolled because you don't follow your doctor's prescribed treatment, you won't be eligible for disability. For more information, see our article on failing to comply with treatmen Continue reading >>

Financial Assistance For Seniors With Diabetes

Financial Assistance For Seniors With Diabetes

Seniors with Diabetes Diabetes affects seniors disproportionately to the general population. Nearly 26% of Americans 65 and older are diagnosed with this condition; this is three times the rate of the general population. The problem is further concentrated among low income seniors. In 2017, approximately 11 million American seniors are dealing with the challenges of managing their diabetes. Costs of Diabetes As if managing diabetes alone was not enough of a challenge, the financial constraints make it even more of a problem for many seniors. A study from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) found the average annual health care costs of persons with diabetes was twice that of those of a similar age without the condition. Annual health care spending was almost $12,000. One in five seniors reports reducing their use of diabetes medication and supplies due to financial constraints. What's more is the cost of diabetes is not limited to medication and supplies; it also costs more to eat healthy and properly manage one's diet. Financial Assistance Fortunately, financial assistance for diabetes medication and supplies is available. When seeking financial assistance, it is helpful to think of two major categories of assistance. First is understanding the benefits of one's insurance coverage to make certain one receives all of which they are entitled. The second category is outside financial assistance. This is a diverse grouping, which can come in the form of cash, free supplies, reduced medication costs, and even assistance to pay insurance co-payments or monthly premiums. The sources of outside financial assistance are equally as diverse as the types of assistance. These include pharmaceutical companies, state governments, non-profit organizations, and clinical studies, to Continue reading >>

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

How costly is diabetes management and treatment? Diabetes management and treatment is expensive. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the average cost of health care for a person with diabetes is $13,741 a year—more than twice the cost of health care for a person without diabetes.1 Many people who have diabetes need help paying for their care. For those who qualify, a variety of government and nongovernment programs can help cover health care expenses. This publication is meant to help people with diabetes and their family members find and access such resources. 1American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care. 2013;36(4):1033–1046. What is health insurance? Health insurance helps pay for medical care, including the cost of diabetes care. Health insurance options include the following: private health insurance, which includes group and individual health insurance government health insurance, such as Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), TRICARE, and veterans’ health care programs Starting in 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) prevents insurers from denying coverage or charging higher premiums to people with preexisting conditions, such as diabetes. The ACA also requires most people to have health insurance or pay a fee. Some people may be exempt from this fee. Read more about the ACA at HealthCare.gov or call 1–800–318–2596, TTY 1–855–889–4325. Key Terms Some terms listed here have many meanings; only those meanings that relate to the financial and medical aspects of diabetes and its management and treatment are included. affiliation period: a period of time that must pass before health insurance coverage provided by a health maintenance organization (HMO) be Continue reading >>

Financial Assistance & Your Rights

Financial Assistance & Your Rights

What financial assistance programs for people with diabetes are available in my province? For more information on government and community financial assistance programs available in your province, please click on the appropriate Financial Assistance Resource below. Do people with diabetes qualify for any disability benefits? There is no standard definition of “disability” in Canada; each federal, provincial/territorial government program and private insurer may interpret “disability” differently and set their own rules for eligibility. For most programs, eligibility is based not on which disease or disability you have, but on how the disease/disability affects your ability to work, participate in society, etc. Do people with diabetes qualify for CPP disability? CPP disability benefit is a monthly amount available to Canadians (under 65 years of age) who have become unable to work because of a disability. You must have paid into the Canada Pension Plan while you were working, in order to qualify. To be eligible for CPP, your disability must be “severe” and “prolonged”. CPP defines a “severe” disability as one that prevents you from doing your former job, or any other job, on a regular basis. So having diabetes alone normally will not qualify you for CPP disability; however if you are experiencing certain diabetes-related complications that have affected your ability to work, you may qualify. Eligibility is determined by CPP medical adjudicators based on information submitted in your application and supporting documentation. Do you have any other questions? Please send them to [email protected] Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage State Laws and Programs Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws and Programs This is a policymaker and consumer guide to state insurance mandated coverage, Medicaid coverage and state-sponsored diabetes programs. It was published 2011and updated material was added January 2016 All state law diabetes mandates and minimum coverage requirements for state-regulated health insurance policies. The tables include the enacted state laws passedsince the firstmandates inCalifornia (1981) and New York (1993). Use links below to go directly to state-based information: State Medicaid diabetes coverage terms and conditions. All Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) diabetes coverage. Contact information and an overview of federal funding provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to state-sponsored diabetes prevention and control programs (DPCPs). DPCPs represent the front line in battling diabetes in most states. An overview of other state activities and initiatives, such as creation of diabetes coordinator positions in the executive branch to fight diabetes. Federal Health Reform.The federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) signed March 2010, has led to changed and expanded coverage termed "EssentialHealth Benefits." Newly Released: NCSL Survey:Diabetes Drug coverage: A new survey of2016 Insurance Plans in 50 states, examining 1) patient access to the scores of diabetes drug treatments and2) results in the 46 states with laws mandating or offering diabetes coverage. NCSL original research, published summer 2016. [Read the report] December 2015: " Diabetes: Addressing the Costs; A 50-State Budget Survey for FY 2014 ." NCSL released its latest diabetes report, taking a closer look at programs and budget appropriations that play a role in con Continue reading >>

Kids With Diabetes Resources

Kids With Diabetes Resources

Information for Parents: Learning About Diabetes – provides visitors and health care professionals with simply written information on diabetes care. They try to use art and design in novel ways to help readers better understand diabetes. About Kids Health – Children health-related resources from the Hospital for Sick Children of Toronto Canada. They offer a very wide spectrum of thorough information on children physical and mental health issues. For information on Juvenile Diabetes in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, please refer to this link. Healthychildren.org – This website offers a great compilation of information by American Academy of Pediatrics. Here you will a lot of information about children’s health issues, childcare, and family well-being. For parents who have a busy life schedule, this website offers an audio playback function so that you can listen to the information while juggling with other duties. And to make the information available to Spanish speaking parents, all articles on this website can be translated into Spanish with one click of a button. For general information on Juvenile Diabetes, please click on this link. For information on Diabetes treatments, please click on this link. The Bump – A website catered to pregnant mothers and new parents. It covers topics related to pregnancy, baby and toddler care. ADA For Parents & Kids – The American Diabetes Association focuses on everything related to Diabetes. This area of org is catered specially to parents whose children have recently been diagnosed with Diabetes. Children with Diabetes – Offers a tremendous amount of information for children and parents about Diabetes. A Sweet life: The Diabetes Magazine – a great source of information on the latest news of Diabetes KidsHealth Continue reading >>

Diabetes On A Stretched Budget

Diabetes On A Stretched Budget

�������������������� If you have diabetes, there is no getting around the fact that taking care of yourself can be expensive. The cost of medical care, diabetes medications and supplies, and healthy foods add up. These expenses can be difficult to manage even in the best of times. In hard times it can seem impossible. With the current economic downturn, many people are having trouble with even the most basic diabetes expenses. This article provides a few suggestions for managing your diabetes during the hard times. General Financial Management Having a budget and sticking to it is important for everyone, even more so during hard times. You should evaluate your personal or family budget at least once a year, or more often if your income or expenses are changing. Involve the entire family in discussing the budget and brainstorming for ways to save money. Here are a few questions to consider: • What is your monthly income? • What are your monthly expenses for essentials (home, utilities, phone, food, transportation, medicine)? • When are your bills due? Avoid late fees by paying bills on time. • Do you have expenses that come once or twice a year (such as taxes and insurance)? • Where does the money go from your wallet? Keep a diary of your spending. • Identify non-essential expenses (entertainment, shopping as “stress management,” soda, eating out). Paying cash helps you stay within your limits. Use a credit card only in emergencies. If you have several cards, cancel most of them, and keep (one and two). Pay off your credit card bill each month, so you aren’t paying high interest for carrying charges. If you have credit card debt, call your creditors to discuss options to deal with it, and try to negotiate a lower Continue reading >>

Does Medicare Cover Diabetes-related Medical Expenses?

Does Medicare Cover Diabetes-related Medical Expenses?

Medicare covers supplies for people with diabetes, whether or not they use insulin. These include glucose testing monitors, blood glucose test strips, lancet devices and lancets, and glucose control solutions. There may be some limits on supplies or how often you get them. Medicare also covers the cost of therapeutic shoes, self-management training, nutrition counseling, flu and pneumococcal pneumonia shots, and glaucoma screening for people with diabetes. For more information, see Medicare Coverage of Diabetes Related Supplies and Services at the Medicare Web site. In addition, Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older who have diabetes and haven’t had a medical eye exam in the past three years can receive a free comprehensive eye exam and up to one year of follow-up care for any condition diagnosed at the initial exam. Does Medicaid cover diabetes-related medical expenses? Medicaid is a state administered program and each state sets its own guidelines regarding eligibility and services. Visit the Medicaid Site for Consumer Information to locate information by state. How do I figure the cost of diabetes for my company? Where can I find free or low-cost diabetes coverage and services? The Bureau of Primary Health Care within the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has a nationwide network of community-based health care centers that provide primary health care services at little or no cost. Hospitals and other health care facilities participating in HRSA’s Hill-Burton Program provide free and low-cost services to eligible individuals. The State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) provides free or low-cost health insurance for children. The Partnership for Prescription Assistance provides information about public and private patient assi Continue reading >>

Financial Assistance For Diabetes To Manage Type I Diabetes

Financial Assistance For Diabetes To Manage Type I Diabetes

Type I diabetes affect many Australians each year. According to Diabetes Australia, 120,000 people in Australia have diabetes type I. In order to understand how to get financial assistance for diabetes, patients require to understand how best to manage their condition. It is important to see professional help in this regard as the information below are suggestions that can provide a better understanding of managing diabetes type I. How to manage diabetes type I? The first step towards the management of Type I diabetes is to understand what it is and what it is not. Type I diabetes is an autoimmune disease. In this context, immunity is what protects a person from foreign elements, such as viruses and bacteria. In autoimmunity, the body mistakenly acts against its own tissues. In Type I, the immune cells along with proteins react in contradiction of the cells that make insulin, destroying them. Despite the fact that the disease starts dramatically, Type I diabetes does not occur overnight. Many Australian patients provide a history of a number of months of increasing thirst and urination, among other symptoms. Handling the physical as well as emotional consequences of Type I diabetes is essential. What makes the disease a difficult one are the physical difficulties related to poor control of the blood glucose. These problems exist as short-term or long-term complications. Short-term complications are the results of a blood glucose that is either very low or very high. Low blood glucose can occur in minutes on account of too much insulin, too little food, or too much exercise. However, high blood glucose often takes several hours to develop. Whereas low blood glucose frequently can be managed at home, severe high blood glucose is an emergency that is managed by a doctor in Continue reading >>

Getting Financial Help For Diabetes

Getting Financial Help For Diabetes

By the dLife Editors No matter whom you ask—patients, caregivers, medical professionals, insurers, even employers—diabetes is expensive. In 2013, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) released the results of their five-year cost analysis, which showed that people with diabetes spend an average of $13,700 per year on healthcare-related expenses. The Health Care Cost Institute examined the spending of people under the age of sixty-five who were covered by employer-sponsored insurance from 2009 to 2013. They found that expenses were even higher, at approximately $15,000 per person. And when you look at the impact on the workforce, lost productivity and wages send these costs into the billions. It’s estimated that people with diabetes have healthcare costs totaling almost three times that of people without diagnosed diabetes. It’s no wonder that many need financial help. If you are one of them, there are a number of financial resources to tap into. Here are some quick ideas to get you started. Look for an insurance plan that covers as many diabetes-related expenses as possible. Check out the governmental and nongovernmental programs—both federal and local—to see where you qualify. Visit this government site to see what benefits you qualify for: Contact your primary care provider as well as the makers of any medications you use to find out if assistance programs are available. Dial 2-1-1, a free and confidential services that helps people find the local resources they need. Contact a medical social worker—typically found in a hospital—to discuss your options. Want to know more? Let’s look closer at your options. GENERAL Health Insurance Because health insurance is meant to cover unexpected future illnesses, diabetes that has already been diagnosed present Continue reading >>

Social Services For Type 2 Diabetes Help

Social Services For Type 2 Diabetes Help

Managing diabetes involves often overwhelming financial, emotional, and physical commitments. Numerous national and local service agencies can provide the support you need. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . People with type 2 diabetes face significant challenges each day to maintain their health and prevent long-term diabetes complications. Dealing with diabetes can be a lot for one person to take on, both financially and emotionally. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes spend an average of $11,744 a year on medical expenses, more than twice the amount spent by people without diabetes. For those without adequate health insurance coverage and who need help paying for their care and treatment, service agencies offer assistance, provided you meet certain qualifications. Government agencies offering a variety of financial and social services include: Medicaid. Qualification for Medicaid is based on income; its a state and federally funded program that offers assistance in paying for medical costs, including those associated with diabetes care. Doctors' visits, prescription medications, and hospital stays may be at least partially covered by Medicaid. Medicare. Medicare is limited to people age 65 and older, with the exception of younger individuals who have particular disabilities. Medicare is a federal program that helps pay for medical costs, including diabetes care and treatment if you qualify. Coverage and costs vary based on the type of Medicare plan that you have. Social Security. The Social Security Administration is a federal program that offers disability benefits to people with diabetes who qualify. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Assistance Programs

Diabetes Assistance Programs

Diabetes can be expensive and many people with it need help paying some of the bills. Having an insurance plan in place would be ideal but is not the case for everyone. If you lack health care coverage, many drug companies provide healthcare assistance if you meet specific requirements. Below is a list of sites that can help you get specific assistance. For the pharmaceutical sites, determine who manufactures the drug you need and contact them to see what assistance they can provide. The Partnership for Prescription Assistance helps qualifying patients without prescription drug coverage get the medicines they need for free or nearly free. RXassist offers a comprehensive database of patient assistance programs, as well as practical tools, news, and articles so that health care professionals and patients can find the information they need. CR3 Diabetes mission is to make a difference in the lives of people living with diabetes all over the world by providing equipment and encouragement to those in need. Insulin Pumpers Foundation is pleased to offer a program that helps bring insulin pump technology to those in our society who do not have the financial resources to purchase an insulin pump on their own. Medtronic Diabetes has a financial assistance program for current users of their pumps. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Financial Assistance

Diabetes Financial Assistance

Diabetes management and treatment is long-term and is expensive for individuals to pay for. In 2012, $176 billion was spent in total for direct medical costs from diabetes patients. The American Diabetes Association found that on average every individual will need to pay out of pocket for diabetes related medical expenses of $13,741 per year. This is 2.3 times higher than the cost that an American without diabetes would normally pay for health care. One of the biggest problems with diabetes is the number of complications that can arise throughout the lifespan of an individual. These consequences as a result of poor management of diabetes or as a result of a dramatic increase of the cost for health care, which patients are unable to pay for. Many people who have diabetes will suffer from a range of impacts including: 1. Hypoglycemia: Hypoglycemia is a common condition for diabetics, where the blood sugar (glucose) is too low. Individuals can confusion, dizziness, headaches, sweating, weakness and anxiety. In more severe cases, there have been over 280,000 emergency room visits due to hypoglycemia in 2011. 2. Hypertension: High blood pressure is a common complication that can occur for diabetes patients. Hypertension is a condition when the blood pressure is above average or normal. This can cause excessive pressure on your artery walls and as a result damage blood vessels and vital organs in the process. 3. Dyslipidemia: Individuals with diabetes can have a high or abnormal amount of cholesterol or fat within their body. This can result in developing cardiovascular disease, which in some cases can be fatal. 4. Heart Attack: Individuals with diabetes are more susceptible to having heart attacks. This is a serious medical emergency where treatment requires surgery or medic Continue reading >>

Living With

Living With

If you have type 1 diabetes, it's important to look after your own health and wellbeing, with support from those involved in your care. Your diabetes care team As type 1 diabetes is a long-term condition, you'll be in regular contact with your diabetes care team. Your GP or diabetes care team will also need to check your eyes, feet and nerves regularly because they can also be affected by diabetes. You should also be tested regularly – at least once a year – to check how well your diabetes is being controlled over the long term. A blood sample will be taken from your arm, and the HbA1c test will be carried out. It measures how much glucose is in the red blood cells, and gives your blood glucose levels for the previous two to three months. For help managing your diabetes on a day-to-day basis, check out the mumoActive app in our Digital Apps Library. Lifestyle changes Healthy eating Eating a healthy, balanced diet is very important if you have diabetes. However, you don't need to avoid certain food groups altogether. You can have a varied diet and enjoy a wide range of foods as long as you eat regularly and make healthy choices. You can make adaptations when cooking meals, such as reducing the amount of fat, salt and sugar you eat, and increasing the amount of fibre. You don't need to completely exclude sugary and high-fat foods from your diet, but they should be limited. The important thing in managing diabetes through your diet is to eat regularly and include starchy carbohydrates, such as pasta, as well as plenty of fruit and vegetables. If your diet is well balanced, you should be able to achieve a good level of health and maintain a healthy weight. Read more about healthy recipes. Diabetes UK has more dietary advice and cooking tips. Regular exercise As physical Continue reading >>

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

For diabetic patients who need financial assistance with supplies and related health care items and services, the following programs may be of help. Please note that applications must be submitted to the programs and not to PPA® . Categories Insulin Access Programs Blink Health is working with Eli Lilly and Company to offer a 40 percent discount on Lilly insulins. The Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program delivers the 40 percent discount directly to patients and will be honored at over 67,000 local pharmacies nationwide. Anyone can participate in the Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program via the Blink Health mobile app (available for iOS & Android) or website, www.blinkhealth.com, which has no membership fees or monthly premiums. Patients enter the form, dosage and quantity of the Lilly insulin that matches their prescription. The discount will be automatically applied. Payments are made online and the prescriptions can be picked up at virtually any U.S. pharmacy, including: Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Target, RiteAid, Safeway and Kroger. People using federal government programs are not eligible. Purchases are fully refundable. Assistance: Insulin Free Glucose Meters Abbott Diabetes Care provides free blood glucose monitoring system kits to those with diabetes. Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 USA Tel: 888-522-5226 Fax: 202-337-8314 Email: [email protected] Assistance: Free Glucose Meters Test Strips Roche Diagnostics, the maker of ACCU-CHEK® Products provides a limited supply of ACCU-CHEK Aviva test strips to a network of community clinics and health centers throughout the U.S. to distribute to their low-income and uninsured patients with diabetes. Roache Diagnostics Corporation 9115 Hague Road Indianapolis, IN 46250 Phone: 800 Continue reading >>

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