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Diabetes Feeling Tired

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tweet Many people with diabetes will describe themselves as feeling tired, lethargic or fatigued at times. It could be a result of stress, hard work or a lack of a decent night’s sleep but it could also be related to having too high or too low blood glucose levels. Tiredness as a symptom of diabetes Regular tiredness, particularly tiredness following meals, is a common symptom of diabetes. Read more on the symptoms of diabetes What causes people with diabetes to be tired? Two common reasons for tiredness or lethargy are having too high or too low blood sugar levels. In both cases, the tiredness is the result of having an imbalance between one’s level of blood glucose and the amount or effectiveness of circulating insulin. If you feel tired during the day, despite having slept well, it could be a result of either high or low sugar levels. It is best to test your blood glucose levels to see whether the tiredness is indeed a result of having high or low sugar levels. This is particularly important for people on insulin. Read about the recommended blood glucose levels ranges Tiredness and high blood sugar levels Blood glucose levels go high when there is either insufficient insulin (typically in the case of type 1 diabetes) or the insulin is not working effectively enough (typically in type 2 diabetes). To provide us with energy, insulin is needed to transport glucose from blood into our cells to be used for energy. When there is not enough insulin, or the insulin isn’t working effectively, it means the sugar in our blood cannot get into our cells and therefore our cells do not receive the energy they need. As a result, we feel tired. Managing tiredness and high blood sugar after meals If tiredness is accompanied by high blood glucose levels after meals, it can indica Continue reading >>

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Make You Feel So Tired?

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Make You Feel So Tired?

If you have type 2 diabetes and you’re feeling tired, you’re not alone. Fatigue is a symptom that’s often associated with the condition. There are many possible causes, including everything from diabetes-related complications to underlying conditions. Simply managing diabetes on a daily basis can zap your energy from time to time. However, the most common cause, by far, is uncontrolled blood glucose, says Joel Zonszein, MD, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at the University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. With type 2 diabetes, poor blood sugar control typically results in hyperglycemia or high blood sugar, which can cause fatigue among other symptoms. But Dr. Zonszein notes that high blood glucose isn’t the only cause. “Some people — especially the elderly — get dehydrated because their blood sugars are so high [and this leads to increased urination]. The fatigue, in part, comes from the dehydration,” he says. “It can also come from kidney disease.” Underlying conditions and diabetes-related complications are additional factors that can contribute to tiredness. Dr. Zonszein explains that when people have had type 2 diabetes for a long time, they can develop damage in their kidneys, heart, and liver. “Abnormalities in these organs can also cause fatigue,” he says. When fatigue is a concern, Zonszein will also screen for anemia. Anemia is not caused by diabetes, but it frequently occurs in people with diabetes and is a common cause of fatigue. He will also check the thyroid hormone level. People with diabetes are at increased risk for thyroid diseases, especially hypothyroidism. “A sluggish thyroid together with diabetes can be another cause,” says Zonszein. Medicatio Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Making Me Tired?

Is Diabetes Making Me Tired?

Q: I've had diabetes for seven months, and I'm always tired. Is there anything I can do to overcome being tired all the time? A: Are you monitoring your blood glucose levels? Tiredness is common when glucose stays too high. According to the American Diabetes Association, the target level for fasting blood glucose (before eating) is 70-130 mg/dl and under 180 mg/dl one to two hours after meals. Monitoring your blood glucose can tell you a lot, including how meals and activity affect your blood glucose trends. Another thing to consider is how you're coping with this new reality. A diagnosis of diabetes can contribute to anxiety or even depression. Depression can cause you to feel tired. Ask your provider to screen you for depression. Some things that help keep your blood glucose levels steady, such as getting enough sleep and daily physical activity, can help treat depression, too. Also ask your provider about sleep apnea, a condition that prevents deep sleep. Depression and sleep apnea are common with type 2 diabetes; both are treatable. Virginia Zamudio Lange, R.N., M.S.N., CDE, is a member of Diabetic Living's editorial advisory board. Continue reading >>

Fatigue In Patients With Diabetes: A Review

Fatigue In Patients With Diabetes: A Review

Go to: Abstract Objective Fatigue is a common and distressing complaint among people with diabetes, and likely to hinder the ability to perform daily diabetes self-management tasks. A review of the literature about diabetes-related fatigue was conducted with an eye toward creating a framework for beginning to conduct more focused studies on this subject. A literature search containing the terms diabetes, fatigue, tiredness, and symptoms was conducted to search for literature that addressed diabetes-related fatigue. Diabetes presents many potential pathways for fatigue, but focused studies on this symptom are rare. Furthermore, research on diabetes-related fatigue is limited by fatigue's non-specific symptoms and because fatigue researchers have yet to agree on standardized definition, measurement or diagnostic criteria. Additionally, few diabetes randomized clinical trials included measurement of patient-reported outcomes, such as symptoms or health-related quality of life in their study designs, though one that did provided some the meaningful finding that symptom-focused education improved self-management practices, HbA1c levels, quality of life and symptom distress. Conclusion There is a need to standardized definition, measurement and diagnostic criteria of fatigue in diabetes. We present a model that can guide focused studies on fatigue in diabetes. The model capitalizes on the multidimensional phenomena (physiological, psychological, and lifestyle) associated with fatigue in diabetes. Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus, a major public health problem, affects approximately 6% of the world's adult population, and is increasing in epidemic proportions.1, 2 Among people with diabetes, fatigue is a pervasive and distressing complaint. Although fatigue also occurs in Continue reading >>

Why Is My Diabetes Making Me So Tired?

Why Is My Diabetes Making Me So Tired?

Diabetes and fatigue are often discussed as a cause and effect. In fact, if you have diabetes, you’re more than likely going to experience fatigue at some point. However, there may be much more to this seemingly simple correlation. About 2.5 million people in the United States have chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). CFS is marked by ongoing fatigue that significantly disrupts everyday life. People with this type of extreme fatigue use up their energy sources without necessarily being active. Walking to your car, for example, can zap all your energy. It’s thought that CFS is related to inflammation that disrupts your muscle metabolites. Diabetes, which affects your blood sugar (glucose) and the production of insulin by the pancreas, can also have inflammatory markers. A wealth of studies have looked at the possible connections between diabetes and fatigue. It can be challenging to treat both diabetes and fatigue. However, there are numerous options that can help. You may first need to see your doctor to determine the exact cause of your fatigue. There are numerous studies connecting diabetes and fatigue. One such study looked at the results of a survey on sleep quality. Researchers reported that 31 percent of people with type 1 diabetes had poor sleep quality. The prevalence was slightly larger in adults who had type 2 diabetes, at 42 percent. According to another study from 2015, about 40 percent of people with type 1 diabetes have fatigue longer than six months. The authors also noted that the fatigue is often so severe that it impacts everyday tasks as well as quality of life. A 2013 study was conducted on 37 people with diabetes, as well as 33 without diabetes. This way, the researchers could look at differences in fatigue levels. The participants anonymously answer Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

What exactly is fatigue? Is it just being tired after working a long week or not getting enough sleep? The answer is no. Fatigue is excessive tiredness that makes carrying out simple tasks difficult and interferes with one or more life functions. Sounds terrible, doesn’t it? Well imagine having a chronic illness along with the fatigue. Diabetes and fatigue have a strong relationship, and it can make a person’s life very difficult. The following article will discuss the relationship, along with ways to beat and reduce the risk of living with diabetes and fatigue. What is diabetes fatigue? As it was mentioned above, diabetes fatigue is an extreme tiredness that individuals with diabetes can experience. It is a tiredness that disrupts a person’s life and makes it difficult to function. It is very common, and studies have shown that 85% of those with diabetes experience fatigue. Some signs of fatigue include: Dizziness Irritability Headache Inability to concentrate Problems remembering things Blurry vision Slowed reflexes and muscle weakness Is feeling fatigue a sign/symptom of diabetes? Feeling fatigued is definitely a symptom of diabetes. However, fatigue can also be a sign or symptom of many other diseases, so it is important that you talk to your doctor about any problems that you are having. I advise reading the following: Reactive hypoglycemia, a term used to define the crash that a person gets after eating a lot of sugar and carbs, can be an early sign of diabetes. In order for the body to use the sugars and carbs that are consumed for fuel, each molecule must be paired with insulin to get into the cell. If there isn’t enough insulin available, then the sugar molecules stay in the bloodstream and cause high blood sugar. What happens is that over time, eating Continue reading >>

Why Diabetics Get Sleepy After Meals

Why Diabetics Get Sleepy After Meals

A healthy meal should leave you feeling energized and ready to accomplish your daily activities. However, if you feel sleepy after a meal or find yourself taking a nap on the couch after eating, it may be because of your diabetes. You will need to do a bit of experimentation to find out the cause of your sleepiness, but it is possible to correct this simple problem. Video of the Day For many people with diabetes, eating too much, and especially eating too much carbohydrates and sugar, makes them feel very tired after the meal. Feeling tired and lack of energy are common symptoms of hyperglycemia, or high-blood sugar levels. You may have a lot of sugar circulating through your bloodstream, but your insulin is either deficient or inefficient at getting that sugar into your cells. If your cells are not getting sugar, which is their main source of energy, they feel tired and so do you. Hyperglycemia also may be, but is not always, accompanied by increased thirst and frequent urination. Hypoglycemia, or low-blood sugar levels, may be the cause of your sleepiness after eating. Hypoglycemia can happen if you have taken too much insulin or diabetes medications for the amount of carbohydrates you ate or if you had quickly digestible carbohydrates that made your blood sugar levels peak high and then crash within one to two hours. If your blood sugar levels drop below 70 mg/dL, it is considered a low-blood sugar level and you need to treat it immediately with either three to four glucose tablets, 1/2 cup of a regular soft drink, 1/2 cup of fruit juice or 1 tbsp. of sugar or honey. If you experience low-blood sugar, you also may feel hungry, shaky, dizzy, weak, confused and irritable. Blood Sugar Target With diabetes, it is important to adjust your treatment plan, which includes yo Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

Fatigue is one of the most common disabling diabetes symptoms. Diabetes fatigue can disrupt and interfere with all aspects of daily living. What causes diabetes fatigue, and why is it so common? We’ve written about fatigue before and received tons of great comments on those posts. But this time let’s go deeper and find the whole range of causes and solutions, even if it takes a few weeks. Hopefully, everyone will find something that might help them, because this is a serious problem. For example, Melanie wrote, “[Fatigue] really takes a toll on my family and things we can do. I just want to have the energy to play with my son and to do things around the house or with friends…I can’t drive more than 30 minutes because my husband is afraid I will fall asleep…and wreck [the car]. (I have dozed while driving before.)” Maria commented, “Fatigue is a constant and I have had to learn to do only what I can. I don’t push myself anymore as I pay for it dearly. I get tired of explaining why I don’t feel good, don’t want to do anything. Some understand and some don’t.” And Jan wrote, “I sleep from midnight to noon each day. Then I get depressed because I wasted half a day.” Because of my multiple sclerosis (MS), I live with fatigue sometimes, and I know how limiting it is. I know how difficult it can be to manage. There are more than 15 known causes for fatigue. It helps to figure out what is causing yours, so you can address it. Here are some possibilities. First, diabetes can directly cause fatigue with high or low blood sugar levels. • High blood glucose makes your blood “sludgy,” slowing circulation so cells can’t get the oxygen and nutrients they need. Margaret commented, “I can tell if my sugars are high in the morning, because ‘grogg Continue reading >>

Tired All The Time? It Could Be Your Diabetes

Tired All The Time? It Could Be Your Diabetes

If you’re coping with diabetes and feel wiped out all the time — the kind of fatigue that isn’t helped by eating or getting a little extra sleep — your doctor might tell you that your blood sugar levels are to blame. But research suggests that the fatigue associated with diabetes could have other causes. In a study published in June 2012 in The Diabetes Educator, researchers Cynthia Fritschi, PhD, RN and Laurie Quinn, PhD, RN, found that stress, depression, body mass index (BMI), and lack of physical activity can all be significant contributors to fatigue in people with diabetes. In the study, 83 women ages 40 to 65 with type 2 diabetes completed questionnaires about their health, fatigue levels, diabetes symptoms, depression, emotional distress, physical activity, and how they were managing and coping with diabetes. Some of the women wore a continuous glucose monitor for three days to assess the changes in their glucose (blood sugar) levels. The researchers found no relationship between the women’s fatigue level and their blood sugar control. Fasting blood sugar, glucose fluctuations over the study period, and results from the A1C test, which measures average blood sugar level over the previous two to three months, did not predict how tired the women reported feeling. “It appears that other factors — such as being overweight, getting little physical activity, and having higher levels of distress — could be causing their fatigue,” Fritschi says. A statement published by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in November 2016 in its journal Diabetes Care recommends that physical activity be prescribed to all people living with diabetes in order to manage glycemic control and overall health. In particular, the ADA urges people living with diabetes to in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tiredness Symptom | Sign No 1 Of 6 Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Diabetes Tiredness Symptom | Sign No 1 Of 6 Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes – Tired, Fatigued And Worn-Out LINK TO SHARE THIS VIDEO: Early symptoms of diabetes like the diabetes tiredness symptom comes with being tired and having a lack of energy. This is one of the most common diabetes symptoms. Although the average person may feel tired from time to time after a busy week or physical exertion. Fatigue associated with diabetes tiredness is entirely a different matter. You may also feel unmotivated, have difficulty concentrating and feel worn-out even after a full 8 hour’s sleep the night before. The tired feeling of diabetes fatigue is usually due to an imbalance of blood sugar. Your cells rely on sugar for fuel and energy. The hormone insulin controls the cell’s ability to remove sugar (glucose) from the blood. When you have diabetes, your blood sugar isn’t entering the cells the way it is supposed to. Your cells rely on this sugar for the fuel that needs to be burned for energy. When your cells are starved for fuel, you won’t have the energy you need – and you chronically feel tired and totally worn-out. These are also early symptoms of diabetes. When the body no longer uses insulin properly in order for the blood sugar (glucose) to enter the cells, this is called insulin resistance. Fatigue is a common complaint that doctors hear on a routine basis. Fatigue and feeling tired can be caused by many ailments. What separates diabetes fatigue is that is frequently present along with other telltale symptoms such as: excessive thirst, frequent urination, slow healing of wounds, weight gain or loss and blurry vision. Keep in mind that you can have elevated blood sugar with no signs at all. In order to combat the tired feeling of diabetes fatigue, you have to get your blood sugar levels back to a normal range. Continue reading >>

Is This Why You’re Tired All The Time?

Is This Why You’re Tired All The Time?

If you have diabetes and you’re tired all the time, don’t just chalk the fatigue up to your fluctuating blood sugar. Turns out that the emotional toll of dealing with diabetes can be what’s behind your fatigue, according to a new study published in The Diabetes Educator. And you don’t have to just take it. Researchers from the University of Illinois College of Nursing measured the blood sugar levels of 83 diabetic women over the age of 40, and also asked them general questions about their health. Instead of shifting blood sugar levels being linked with fatigue—as is often assumed by doctors—other factors, like depression and BMI, were shown to be greater indicators of whether women felt constantly tired. "People have always assumed blood sugar is the cause of fatigue," says lead study author Cynthia Fritschi, RN, PhD. "It really isn't. Stress, depression, sleep—all of these play a bigger factor in fatigue than blood sugar or blood glucose.” Here’s the problem: Being tired makes you less likely to do what you need to do to keep your diabetes in check, like exercising and eating healthy meals. And doctors don’t typically pick up on these lifestyle issues. "People want to know why they're lacking that get-up-and-go, but doctors don't ask how are you feeling? how are you sleeping? how is your daytime activity?” says Fritschi. Here’s how to make sure your fatigue is being addressed: Be specific. When discussing symptoms with your doctor, state the outcome as well, says Fritschi: Because I'm tired, I'm not able to do x, y and z. "It helps your doctor see that your fatigue is not just a symptom; it's keeping you from taking care of yourself." Take your own health inventory. "Think of the things you can control," says Fritschi. "What's your diet and leve Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Reactive Hypoglycemia And Insulin Resistance

Symptoms Of Reactive Hypoglycemia And Insulin Resistance

Being plagued by excessive fatigue is bad enough, but problems with blood sugar regulation can also lead to even scarier downstream issues including heart disease, stroke, cancer, dementia, and more. Feeling sleepy all the time and being chronically fatigued are classic reactive hypoglycemia and insulin resistance symptoms. The standard American diet, high in simple sugars and processed foods, is notorious for causing problems with blood sugar regulation. In the short term, eating a meal loaded with sugar and refined carbs (like white flour) can cause you to experience wild swings in blood sugar. These large blood sugar swings make you feel tired, anxious, irritable, and hungry for more quickly absorbed sugars. Feeling sleepy all the time and experiencing these other symptoms of blood sugar dysregulation after a high-carb meal is not normal, nor is it healthy. These are the classic signs of what is known as reactive hypoglycemia and they may be insulin resistance symptoms, which is more serious and could be an early warning sign of diabetes down the road according to the medical journal, Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity.[1] So how are sugars and sweets linked to the problem of feeling sleepy all the time along with reactive hypoglycemia and insulin resistance symptoms? Eating this way carries with it a “high glycemic load,” meaning it contains high amounts of the kind of carbohydrates which quickly release their sugars into the bloodstream. High-glycemic-load diets have been shown in human studies to lead to feeling sleepy all the time, daytime fatigue, poorer sleep, and slower cognitive performance.[2,3] In the long term, eating a diet full of empty calories, refined carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes), sugars, and sweetened beverages Continue reading >>

Is It Diabetes When I Am So Tired After Eating?

Is It Diabetes When I Am So Tired After Eating?

You may feel tired after eating for several reasons, including being an undiagnosed diabetic. Keep a food and activity journal to help you and your doctor identify the cause of your fatigue. Implementing dietary and other lifestyle changes may alleviate your symptoms, but before modifying your daily routine, speak with your doctor to determine if medical testing is necessary to rule out or confirm a diabetes diagnosis. Video of the Day Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The body recognizes insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas as foreign intruders and destroys them. Without these cells, the body produces little to no insulin. Type 1 diabetics must take insulin via injections or through an insulin pump to sustain life. Without insulin, your blood glucose levels elevate after eating, causing symptoms such as fatigue, hunger, extreme thirst, frequent urination, tingling of the limbs and blurry eyesight. A healthy diet that limits sweets and other simple carbohydrates and includes lean proteins, fiber, whole grains, fruits and vegetables helps diabetics adequately control their blood glucose levels. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs as a result of the body’s inability to correctly use or produce insulin. MedlinePlus reports that individuals with excess body fat are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes because fat interferes with insulin use; normal-weight people can also develop this disease. Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes are similar to those of Type 1 diabetes and include fatigue, increased appetite and thirst, slow-healing infections, frequent urination, blurred vision and erectile dysfunction. A person with this condition may experience fatigue after eating when blood glucose levels are poorly controlled. If your food journal in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Why Are People With Type 2 Diabetes Always Tired?

Why Are People With Type 2 Diabetes Always Tired?

“I am suffering from diabetes; I am tired of being tired and talking about how tired I am”! Does diabetes make you feel tired all the time? Diabetes, a life-long disease, affects the way our body handles glucose, a kind of sugar present in our blood. Most of the people diagnosed with diabetes suffer from Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes also know as non insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way our body metabolizes sugar (glucose), which is the body’s important source of fuel. In Type 2 Diabetes, our body either resists the effects of insulin, a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into the cells or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. What causes diabetic fatigue and what can be done to gain our energy back? Feeling tired or lethargic is one of the most common and spiking symptoms of diabetes. It has been reported that most of the people suffering from diabetes experiences excessive tiredness to the extent that it interferes with one or two life functions. Let us have a look at the causes of diabetes chronic fatigue: High blood sugar: When the blood sugar levels are high, they make the blood sticky. It becomes difficult for the blood to easily get through the capillaries, and to bring oxygen to the cells. Therefore, our cells do not receive the energy they need, making us feel tired. Low blood sugar levels: When the sugar levels in our body become low it indicates that our cells are not getting enough energy. Therefore, it will make a person feel tired or fatigued. Insulin resistance: This condition keeps the glucose out of the body cell, so they don’t have enough energy. Mental stress: People suffering from diabetes are mostly stressed out. This also keeps them feeling tired and exhausted mo Continue reading >>

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