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Diabetes Feeling Hot All The Time

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Common symptoms of low blood sugar are: Feeling dizzy, shaky, or lightheaded Feeling nervous or anxious Having a fast heart beat Sweating Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Hunger Is A Symptom

Hunger Is A Symptom

Our fat-hating society has transferred all the loathing we used to feel for blatant displays of greed, lust, and pride to a single sin, gluttony. The rest of those erstwhile sins now have transformed into the characteristics of the celebrities we admire. This has had the unfortunate side effect of making people who find themselves feeling extremely hungry believe that they are suffering a moral lapse--gluttony--rather than recognizing that they are experiencing a medical symptom. But the raging muchies--the kind of hunger that leaves you at the open fridge shoveling in everything in sight--is a symptom. You can induce it in an otherwise normal person with a couple of tokes of pot. You also see it in millions of otherwise normal women a few days before they get their period. And sadly, it is a symptom that often emerges along with insulin resistance in people who have the genetic make up that leads to Type 2 diabetes because insulin resistance is a prime factor that leads to raging hunger. Exactly why isn't completely understood, but we do know that one of the main things that can cause hunger is swiftly moving blood sugar of the type that happen when blood sugar goes way up after a meal and then plummets back down as it does in hypoglyemica. People with Type 1 diabetes who are prone to severe hypos can tell you all about the hunger that comes with dropping blood sugars. In fact, someone on Tudiabetes.com recently described waking up with a very low blood sugar and attempting to eat their clock radio. This sounds funny, but it isn't, first of all because it really happened to a real person and secondly because it shows how powerful the brain's response to a hunger signal can be. Hunger is the single strongest drive in any living being, far stronger than sex, because with Continue reading >>

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

Find a weather-proof location to exercise all year round. Working out in your living room or local gym, or even just walking your local mall are all good options. When temperatures start to get out of control, so can your blood sugar. Both hot and cold weather extremes can affect your testing equipment and your medications, and have a negative impact on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin. Research shows that when it’s hot out, more people with diabetes end up in the ER and are hospitalized because of heat illness. The number of deaths in diabetes patients due to heat illness also increases in summer. Low temperatures can be an issue for people with diabetes as well. But you don’t have to let the environment have the upper hand. Taking a few smart precautions can help you outsmart Mother Nature. Here are the adjustments to make depending on where you live and the weather forecast. 6 Tips to Survive the Summer Heat Take these steps to keep your diabetes under control when the temperature soars: Stay hydrated. Lori Roust, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, explains, “The problem is that in the heat, people tend to get dehydrated easily. When you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys. With less blood, your kidneys don’t work as efficiently to clear out any excess glucose (blood sugar) from your urine.” When it’s hot, be sure to drink plenty of water or sugar-free drinks. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to replenish fluids. Store your medications properly. High summer temps can affect your diabetes medications, glucose meter, and diabetes test strips. “When it’s hot out, it’s easy for insulin and other drugs to become degraded,” Dr. Roust says. Be su Continue reading >>

Feeling Extremely Hot With Intense Sweating Can Be A Bad Sign For Ckd And Diabetics

Feeling Extremely Hot With Intense Sweating Can Be A Bad Sign For Ckd And Diabetics

A KidneyBuzz.com viewer wrote, "Is it just me or do others write in and ask about problems they are suffering with feeling excessively hot?" He continued, "I am in an AC room with my girlfriend and all of a sudden I start feeling flushed, terribly hot, and pouring in sweat while she is freezing! I don't know if it's my thyroid or hormones or what, but is there anything I can do!" Recommended Reading: How Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetics Can Overcome Feeling "Drained" During Hot Weather While each Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patient is completely different, and it would be impossible for KidneyBuzz.com to suggest what might be causing you to feel extremely hot and sweaty, there are some common but lesser known complications that may cause this issue. As you know, KidneyBuzz.com does not offer medical advice, but the following strategies may assist Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients to improve their condition as well as their overall quality of life. Recommended Reading: Fruits and Vegetables can Effectively Hydrate Individuals with CKD better than a Glass of Water If you start to feel sweaty and really hot like a heat wave just hit or as if the room which you are in is locked and the temperature is rising, and/or your energy starts to decrease, then you may be suffering from Low Blood Sugar. Intense perspiration accompanied by decreased energy is a common problem in Diabetic patients, but did you know that the process of Dialysis can also cause Low Blood Sugar even if you DO NOT have Diabetes!? Recommended Reading: The Best Way CKD Patients Can Prevent Weight Gain, Lower Diabetes Risk And Improve Energy Fast When you have Dialysis, the process removes most things from your blood, including sugar. Although your Dialysate Bath (used in dialysis to dra Continue reading >>

6 Reasons You're Tired All The Time

6 Reasons You're Tired All The Time

We all tend to blame being tired on a too-busy lifestyle. And much of the time we're right. But if you feel tired all the time or your always asking yourself "why am I so tired?", don't blow it off. Give yourself about 2 to 3 weeks to make some lifestyle changes: Get more sleep, trim your social calendar, eat more wholesome foods, drink more fluids, take a multivitamin, and cut back on caffeine and alcohol. (Try drinking this and sleep 90 minutes longer.) "If you're still feeling the symptoms of fatigue after those changes, then you need professional help," says Sandra Adamson Fryhofer, MD, an internal medicine doctor in Atlanta. Excess exhaustion could be the sign of a more serious medical condition that can be treated. (Discover the ONE simple, natural solution that can help you reverse chronic inflammation and heal more than 45 diseases. Try The Whole Body Cure today!) Prevention Premium: 30 Stay-Well Secrets From People Who Never Get Sick Here are the six most common problems you need to know about. The fatigue caused by anemia is the result of a lack of red blood cells, which bring oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and cells. You may feel weak and short of breath. Anemia may be caused by an iron or vitamin deficiency, blood loss, internal bleeding, or a chronic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, or kidney failure. Women of childbearing age are especially susceptible to iron-deficiency anemia because of blood loss during menstruation and the body's need for extra iron during pregnancy and breastfeeding, explains Laurence Corash, MD, adjunct professor of laboratory medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. The symptoms: Feeling tired all the time is a major one. Others include extreme weakness, difficulty sleeping, lack of concentration Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nephropathy

Diabetic Nephropathy

Diabetic nephropathy is kidney damage that occurs as a result of diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy causes illness and sometimes death for people with diabetes. Diabetes affects approximately seven percent of people in the United States. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and kidney failure in the nation. People who already have diabetes are susceptible to developing diabetic nephropathy if they: are of African American, Hispanic or Native and Alaskan American origin have a family history of kidney disease or high blood pressure have poor control of blood sugar had type 1 diabetes before age 20 are a smoker Not everyone with diabetes develops chronic kidney disease, but researchers believe that those who do not properly control their blood glucose levels are at risk. The kidneys are each made up of around 1 million nephrons that remove extra fluid and wastes out from the blood. These nephrons help regulate water, salts, glucose, urea, phosphorus and other minerals. Those with diabetes have a lot of glucose that comes out in their urine. High blood sugar levels can damage the tiny blood vessels in the nephrons by thickening and scarring them so that over time they are damaged. When this happens, protein leaks through the kidneys into the urine. The nephrons are no longer able to filter properly and this is when kidneys damage can lead to kidney failure. Symptoms of diabetic nephropathy In the beginning stages of diabetic nephropathy, people may not experience any symptoms. Symptoms of diabetic nephropathy are similar to symptoms of chronic kidney disease and tend to occur in the late stages of kidney disease. These symptoms include: A metallic taste in the mouth or ammonia breath Nausea and vomiting Loss of appetite No longer wanting to ea Continue reading >>

Heat And Type 1 Diabetes

Heat And Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is part of our Daily Life library of resources. To learn more about the many things that affect your health and daily management of Type 1, visit here. Whether experiencing hot summer temperatures or a tropical vacation, it is important for everyone to beware of the heat – and the various effects that it can have on our bodies. Have you ever noticed your blood sugar either spiking or dropping rapidly in severe temperatures? Many people with Type 1 diabetes run into this issue and have been baffled as to why. Heat may have much more of an impact on your blood glucose levels than you realized! Keeping a close eye on your BG becomes even more important when in areas with higher temperatures. Here are some possible explanations to the heat’s role in blood sugar fluctuations, and some factors to keep in mind while enjoying your summer fun in the sun with Type 1! High blood sugar Heat can spike blood sugar levels easily if we are not properly hydrated. When the body is dehydrated, blood glucose becomes more concentrated due to the decrease in blood flow through the kidneys. This makes it much more difficult for the kidneys to remove any excess glucose from urine. How to fix it? Adjust insulin dosages as instructed by a medical professional, and most importantly drink plenty of water! Low blood sugar Blood glucose levels have been known to plummet in the heat – especially when combined with exercise. Why is this? Heat can cause the body’s blood vessels to expand, which in turn can speed up insulin absorption and potentially lead to hypoglycemia. This can be made worse when exercising due to the increased blood flow to certain areas, especially if insulin is injected in the legs. Also consider that hot tubs/jacuzzis or hot showers/baths can have the s Continue reading >>

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia can be a very serious condition, with extreme cases causing seizures, coma, and even death. It occurs when blood sugar levels drop too low, and it is most often experienced by people with diabetes. As you learn about diabetes management, being well versed in low blood sugar symptoms will enable you to detect the signs of impending hypoglycemia and act quickly to head it off or minimize its impact. Diabetes Type and Hypoglycemia Risk Hypoglycemia risk varies across the three different types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia most often, as their diabetes management often requires a lot of attention and careful planning. The average person with type 1 diabetes who is attempting aggressive disease control may still experience low blood sugar symptoms frequently, and a full-blown case of hypoglycemia will require close medical attention. "When it comes to type 1 diabetes, the body can't make insulin on its own, so it must be administered," notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, Everyday Health contributor and author of Belly Fat for Dummies. Paying close attention to your diet is important, too. "If the correct amount of insulin is given based on the amount of carbohydrates consumed, blood sugar levels can remain in a healthy range." Type 2 Diabetes These patients experience hypoglycemia less frequently than people with type 1 diabetes; the rate of hypoglycemia for type 2 diabetes patients taking insulin is about one-third that of type 1 diabetes patients. But research shows that the frequency of hypoglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes increases as the disease becomes more advanced. "In people with type 2 diabetes, the body may produce adequate insulin, yet the cells are resistant to it, making the insulin ineffecti Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Many people with diabetes will experience times when they sweat too much, too little, or at odd times. Diabetes-related nervous system damage and low blood sugars cause these commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Sweating complications can be a sign of poor diabetes management. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial to both prevention and treatment. Contents of this article: Diabetes and sweating problems People sweat for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are normal and some are not. Sweating is a natural response to physical and emotional stress. But excessive sweating, when the reason is unclear, is often a sign that something is not right. Some people with sweating conditions will sweat even on a cold day or during minimal activity. Low blood sugar levels and diabetes-related nervous system damage cause the most commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Extremely low blood sugars cause a fight-or-flight response, triggering the release of hormones that increase sweating. When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, a loss of nerve function can occur. This condition is known as diabetic neuropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) claim that around half of people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy. If the nerves that control the sweat glands are damaged, they may send the wrong message to sweat glands, or none at all. In most cases, neuropathies cause either excessive sweating or an inability to sweat. Sweating caused by hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a term to describe abnormally low blood sugar levels. For most adults, blood glucose levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter are considered hypoglycemic. Individual targets can vary, however. Many diabetes management medica Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

How To Detect Diabetes Symptoms

How To Detect Diabetes Symptoms

1 Recognize your risk for diabetes. Although doctors are not sure why some people develop diabetes, there are many different factors that can cause or contribute to diabetes.[5] Being aware of your potential risk for diabetes helps you recognize the signs and can ensure you get a timely diagnosis and treatment.[6] The following factors may increase your risk of type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes:[7] Family history Environmental factors, such as exposure to viral illness Presence of autoantibodies in the system, usually after a viral syndrome when the person is young Dietary factors, such as low vitamin D consumption or exposure to cow’s milk or cereals before the age of 4 months Geography, countries such as Finland and Sweden have higher rates of type 1 diabetes Weight, the more fat cells you have, the more resistant to insulin they become Sedentary lifestyle or inactivity, exercises helps control weight and insulin Race, certain groups such as Hispanics and African Americans are more prone to diabetes Age, your risk increases as you get older Polycystic ovary syndrome High blood pressure Abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels Metabolic syndrome Gestational diabetes and giving birth to a baby over 9 pounds can also increase your risk for type 2 diabetes 2 Be aware of what doesn’t cause diabetes. Diabetes is a condition related to blood sugar, so some people might think it’s related to eating sugar. Eating sugar doesn’t cause diabetes — but if you are overweight then you can develop peripheral resistance to sugar; therefore, you have to cut down on the amount of refined sugars that you consume.[8] 3 Determine possible symptoms. Many symptoms of diabetes may not seem serious and aren’t necessarily specific to the disease, so it’s important to watc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Assessment

Diabetes Self Assessment

Could you be at risk of type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a long-term condition that can have serious health consequences including heart disease, stroke, amputation, kidney failure and blindness. With early diagnosis the risk of developing these serious complications can be minimised. Please note, this tool may not be accurate for anyone undergoing treatment for diabetes. QUESTIONS The words in italics indicate possible risk factors or symptoms of diabetes and appear in the tool as a list on the results page. 1. Are you? b) Female 2. How old are you? a) Under 25 (0 points) d) 60 or over (4 points) Your age 3. Are you overweight? a)Yes, I’m overweight for my height (2 points) Being overweight b)I’m slightly overweight (1 point) Being overweight c)No, I’m not overweight (0 points) More on weight Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. If you are overweight, or obese, the cells in your body become less responsive to the effects of insulin. This explains why 80% of people who develop type 2 diabetes are overweight, or obese. If you want to check whether you are a healthy weight for your height you can do this on the NHS healthy weight calculator in the tools library. 4. How would you describe your thirst levels? a) I’m continuously thirsty (2 points) Feeling thirsty all the times b) I’m often thirsty (1 point) Feeling thirsty c) My thirst levels are average (0 points) 5. Do you have a history of diabetes in your immediate family? a) Yes, I have close family members with diabetes (2 points) Having a relative with Type 2 diabetes b) I have a distant relative with diabetes (1 points) c) No, there’s no history of diabetes in my family (0 points) More on genetic factors You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you have a close family member, such as Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes and Excessive Sweating While many people can experience difficulties with sweating, it can also be an issue for people with diabetes. There are three main types of sweating that you may experience. They are: hyperhidrosis: excessive sweating not caused by temperature or exercise gustatory sweating: caused by food and limited to face and neck areas night sweats: caused by low blood glucose during the night Each of these have different types of treatments. Your doctor can recommend the best treatment to help relieve or stop your excessive sweating. However, since sweating can be a sign of other more serious conditions, you should always talk to your doctor if you experience this type of sweating. Hyperhidrosis Hyperhidrosis is the term for excessive sweating. This is sweating that is not from exercising or the temperature. This can occur when your blood glucose gets too low (hypoglycemia). It will trigger a fight or flight response from your body. You produce excess adrenaline and norepinephrine, which cause excess sweating. Once your blood sugar returns to normal, the sweating should stop. If, along with sweating, you have bladder control problems or an unusual heart rate, it could indicate autonomic neuropathy. This is caused by damage to the nerves that control functions like the bladder, blood pressure, and sweating. Excessive sweating can also occur with obesity. Obesity often accompanies diabetes. However, these are not the only ways diabetes and excessive sweating can be connected. Gustatory Sweating Gustatory sweating is different than hyperhidrosis. It is also not unique to people with diabetes. However, people with diabetic autonomic neuropathy are more likely to experience this than those without nerve damage. Luckily, it is easy to identify. If you br Continue reading >>

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