diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Feeling Hot All The Time

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like? Signs & Symptoms Of Hyperglycemia

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like? Signs & Symptoms Of Hyperglycemia

I get my first cup of coffee and sit on the sun deck with the birds singing. I feel as if I have not slept a wink, and my head aches. I could go back to bed and sleep all day, but work awaits. It’s a beautiful, sunny day, but my body feels heavy, and stuck to the chair. It hurts to lift my arms. My blood sugar was 381 this morning. Again. I think about having to face the day at the office. Driving down the interstate, the lines are blurry. I know that if the DMV got wind of it, I might not be driving as high as my A1C had been. When I get to the office, I walk in with a dark fog feeling surrounding me, and take some deep breaths at my desk. As I begin to review the end of the month reports, the numbers get fuzzy, and I can’t concentrate on them. My 36 ounce water bottle with only a few sips left beads sweat on the desk, and it’s across the building to get to the bathroom. Sometimes it’s a race to get there in time. My body is taught and swollen, like the Blueberry Girl from Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. My blood sugar is a blue river of sticky blueberry filling as I roll down the hall toward the bathroom. I feel that if I had a needle, I could pop myself. That would surely be a mess. My skin is so dry and flaky that no amount of lotion will hydrate it. No amount of water can quench my thirst, and my mouth feels like the Sahara Desert. With one hand on the water cooler, and the other hand on the bathroom door, I guzzled down what I could until the feeling hit that I wasn’t going to be able to wait any longer. I was out of regular insulin, and I had taken my long acting insulin. I was not so patiently waiting for it to kick in. This morning was not starting out so well. I’d have to tackle the reports in my current brain fog. I did have a doctor’s appoin Continue reading >>

Heat And Diabetes

Heat And Diabetes

Living with diabetes blog Diabetes research is turning up new information on diabetes and diabetes management all the time. In 2009, I wrote a blog about the effects of heat on blood glucose control if you have diabetes. I mentioned, then, that heat doesn't have a direct effect on your blood glucose, but that heat can lead to changes in your daily routine which, in turn, can affect your blood glucose. Later research, published in September 2010 by researchers at Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz., suggests, additionally, that some Arizonans with diabetes have considerable gaps in their "heat awareness." This lack of awareness led to actions such as waiting until temperatures were quite high (above 101 F, or 38.3 C) before taking precautions against the heat and leaving medications and supplies at home rather than risk exposing them to the heat — meaning not having the supplies to manage diabetes while away from home. Sweating is an important means of cooling the body in hot weather, and the ability to sweat can be affected in some people with diabetes. Other studies have shown an increase in emergency room visits, in those who have diabetes, when temperatures are high. Diabetes equipment and medications can also be affected by heat. Tips for managing diabetes in warm temperatures remain the same: Avoid sunburn, it can stress your body and can raise your blood glucose. Wear a good sunscreen, sunglasses and hat when out in the sun. Drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration. Carry a bottle of water with you on walks, etc. Exercise and do more strenuous activities in the early or later hours of the day when the temperatures are cooler and the sun is not at its peak. Check blood sugar levels frequently, since they may fluctuate. Remember, extreme temperature changes can have Continue reading >>

Heat And Type 1 Diabetes

Heat And Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is part of our Daily Life library of resources. To learn more about the many things that affect your health and daily management of Type 1, visit here. Whether experiencing hot summer temperatures or a tropical vacation, it is important for everyone to beware of the heat – and the various effects that it can have on our bodies. Have you ever noticed your blood sugar either spiking or dropping rapidly in severe temperatures? Many people with Type 1 diabetes run into this issue and have been baffled as to why. Heat may have much more of an impact on your blood glucose levels than you realized! Keeping a close eye on your BG becomes even more important when in areas with higher temperatures. Here are some possible explanations to the heat’s role in blood sugar fluctuations, and some factors to keep in mind while enjoying your summer fun in the sun with Type 1! High blood sugar Heat can spike blood sugar levels easily if we are not properly hydrated. When the body is dehydrated, blood glucose becomes more concentrated due to the decrease in blood flow through the kidneys. This makes it much more difficult for the kidneys to remove any excess glucose from urine. How to fix it? Adjust insulin dosages as instructed by a medical professional, and most importantly drink plenty of water! Low blood sugar Blood glucose levels have been known to plummet in the heat – especially when combined with exercise. Why is this? Heat can cause the body’s blood vessels to expand, which in turn can speed up insulin absorption and potentially lead to hypoglycemia. This can be made worse when exercising due to the increased blood flow to certain areas, especially if insulin is injected in the legs. Also consider that hot tubs/jacuzzis or hot showers/baths can have the s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Feeling Hot

Diabetes And Feeling Hot

Do you have diabetes and ever feel hot all of a sudden? Excruciating perspiration accompanied by decrease in energy is a common problem in diabetic patients. Some have also fainted due to this. The reason behind this hot feeling is due to the decrease in sugar level. Diabetic people really need to control their blood sugar levels. Increase in blood sugar is harmful for organs like kidneys and will negatively affect your heart as well. Similarly, decrease in blood sugar not only brings loss in energy, but will also trigger extremely hot and sweaty feeling. Symptoms of low blood sugar: 1. You start to feel sweaty and really really hot. 2. Feels as if the room is locked and the temperature is rising. 3. Feels like heat wave. 4. Energy starts to decrease. Causes of hot and sweaty feeling: The main cause is the decrease in sugar level. This may be as a result of fasting or continue work load. Diabetics should CONTROL their sugar level, not decrease or increase it. To do this, eat small and eat frequently, like every 3 hours or so. Similarly, this may be as a result of increase in insulin dosage. If you take insulin shots before meal, check to see if you took an overdose. Or maybe your doctor told you to increase it. If this happens everyday, then consult with your doctor and ask him to decrease the prescription. Another cause for feeling extremely hot may be due to the use of turmeric powder. Although there are health benefits of turmeric, it may cause side-effect when taken in overdose. If you’re suffering from Chronic or Acute Kidney Disease, avoid turmeric completely. What to do: What most doctors recommend is have an immediate sugar releaser – chocolate. Or more naturally, sugar. This definitely does not mean that you can eat an entire bar of Snickers or Mars, just a Continue reading >>

Hunger Is A Symptom

Hunger Is A Symptom

Our fat-hating society has transferred all the loathing we used to feel for blatant displays of greed, lust, and pride to a single sin, gluttony. The rest of those erstwhile sins now have transformed into the characteristics of the celebrities we admire. This has had the unfortunate side effect of making people who find themselves feeling extremely hungry believe that they are suffering a moral lapse--gluttony--rather than recognizing that they are experiencing a medical symptom. But the raging muchies--the kind of hunger that leaves you at the open fridge shoveling in everything in sight--is a symptom. You can induce it in an otherwise normal person with a couple of tokes of pot. You also see it in millions of otherwise normal women a few days before they get their period. And sadly, it is a symptom that often emerges along with insulin resistance in people who have the genetic make up that leads to Type 2 diabetes because insulin resistance is a prime factor that leads to raging hunger. Exactly why isn't completely understood, but we do know that one of the main things that can cause hunger is swiftly moving blood sugar of the type that happen when blood sugar goes way up after a meal and then plummets back down as it does in hypoglyemica. People with Type 1 diabetes who are prone to severe hypos can tell you all about the hunger that comes with dropping blood sugars. In fact, someone on Tudiabetes.com recently described waking up with a very low blood sugar and attempting to eat their clock radio. This sounds funny, but it isn't, first of all because it really happened to a real person and secondly because it shows how powerful the brain's response to a hunger signal can be. Hunger is the single strongest drive in any living being, far stronger than sex, because with Continue reading >>

Feeling Extremely Hot With Intense Sweating Can Be A Bad Sign For Ckd And Diabetics

Feeling Extremely Hot With Intense Sweating Can Be A Bad Sign For Ckd And Diabetics

A KidneyBuzz.com viewer wrote, "Is it just me or do others write in and ask about problems they are suffering with feeling excessively hot?" He continued, "I am in an AC room with my girlfriend and all of a sudden I start feeling flushed, terribly hot, and pouring in sweat while she is freezing! I don't know if it's my thyroid or hormones or what, but is there anything I can do!" Recommended Reading: How Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetics Can Overcome Feeling "Drained" During Hot Weather While each Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patient is completely different, and it would be impossible for KidneyBuzz.com to suggest what might be causing you to feel extremely hot and sweaty, there are some common but lesser known complications that may cause this issue. As you know, KidneyBuzz.com does not offer medical advice, but the following strategies may assist Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients to improve their condition as well as their overall quality of life. Recommended Reading: Fruits and Vegetables can Effectively Hydrate Individuals with CKD better than a Glass of Water If you start to feel sweaty and really hot like a heat wave just hit or as if the room which you are in is locked and the temperature is rising, and/or your energy starts to decrease, then you may be suffering from Low Blood Sugar. Intense perspiration accompanied by decreased energy is a common problem in Diabetic patients, but did you know that the process of Dialysis can also cause Low Blood Sugar even if you DO NOT have Diabetes!? Recommended Reading: The Best Way CKD Patients Can Prevent Weight Gain, Lower Diabetes Risk And Improve Energy Fast When you have Dialysis, the process removes most things from your blood, including sugar. Although your Dialysate Bath (used in dialysis to dra Continue reading >>

Complications Of Diabetes

Complications Of Diabetes

Complications are the negative effects of having a condition or illness, and there are a range of complications that may develop with diabetes. However it is important to remember that not everyone with diabetes will develop all or some of the complications. Understanding your diabetes and following the advice of your medical professional will lower your risk. Many of the complications of diabetes are much more likely to occur if you have high blood glucose levels or high blood pressure over long periods of time. Keeping both your blood glucose level and your blood pressure at a healthy range is your best defence against developing the complications of diabetes. Remember that every improvement you make to your blood glucose level or blood pressure will reduce your risk of developing complications. You don’t have to be in the target range to reduce your risks, although you will get the best improvement the closer your blood pressure and blood glucose are to target levels. It may seem daunting, but the good news is that there are things you can do to reduce your risk of developing complications, and if you have already developed a complication it’s likely there are things you can do manage it. On the side bar is more information on different complications and what you can do to stay well. For many years diabetes has been the leading cause of people developing blindness in New Zealand. However, with new advances in how to prevent or… Kidneys Having diabetes can damage the small blood vessels in your body. This is particularly so if your blood glucose levels or blood pressure remain high… Even common foot problems can be dangerous for people with diabetes, as they may lead to more serious foot problems. Impotence is a side effect of diabetes for many men. Impotence Continue reading >>

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

Find a weather-proof location to exercise all year round. Working out in your living room or local gym, or even just walking your local mall are all good options. When temperatures start to get out of control, so can your blood sugar. Both hot and cold weather extremes can affect your testing equipment and your medications, and have a negative impact on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin. Research shows that when it’s hot out, more people with diabetes end up in the ER and are hospitalized because of heat illness. The number of deaths in diabetes patients due to heat illness also increases in summer. Low temperatures can be an issue for people with diabetes as well. But you don’t have to let the environment have the upper hand. Taking a few smart precautions can help you outsmart Mother Nature. Here are the adjustments to make depending on where you live and the weather forecast. 6 Tips to Survive the Summer Heat Take these steps to keep your diabetes under control when the temperature soars: Stay hydrated. Lori Roust, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, explains, “The problem is that in the heat, people tend to get dehydrated easily. When you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys. With less blood, your kidneys don’t work as efficiently to clear out any excess glucose (blood sugar) from your urine.” When it’s hot, be sure to drink plenty of water or sugar-free drinks. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to replenish fluids. Store your medications properly. High summer temps can affect your diabetes medications, glucose meter, and diabetes test strips. “When it’s hot out, it’s easy for insulin and other drugs to become degraded,” Dr. Roust says. Be su Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Risk Factors

Prediabetes Risk Factors

Incredibly, one in four Americans over age 20 has prediabetes -- and most don't even know it. Being prediabetic means that your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but short of being classified as diabetic levels. Studies show that most people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years, unless they lose weight and make dietary and exercise changes. Because prediabetes develops gradually over years, it's often said that there are no obvious symptoms. But it's possible to notice certain warning signs of growing insulin resistance, the inability to process the energy in food properly that's a key aspect of prediabetes, says Beth Reardon, director of nutrition for Duke Integrative Medicine at Duke University. Paying close attention to such warning signs gives you plenty of time to make changes before the situation progresses to type 2 diabetes, she says. "These symptoms usually occur in tandem with one another; together they create a bigger picture that says insulin resistance is going on," Reardon says. "Some signs can be measured, some we feel, some we can just see." If you're experiencing the following signs, you should ask your doctor about an insulin response test to measure your insulin and blood sugar levels. If the tests confirm that your body is starting to have trouble managing its glucose, it may be incentive for you to commit to the diet and exercise changes that can help move you away from the path toward diabetes. What Feeling Tired and Sluggish After Eating Might Mean Ready to nap right after a big meal? This is a normal response to an influx of carbs (think of that post-Thanksgiving dinner feeling). But if it happens often, your body may be sending a message that your diet is too diabetes-friendly. After eating, all carbohydrat Continue reading >>

Are You A Secret Diabetic?

Are You A Secret Diabetic?

Figures reveal that around one million Britons are 'secret diabetics' - unable to recognise the symptoms, so unaware they have the condition. There are 1.4 million known diabetics in the UK and, if left untreated, the disease can have devastating consequences. Most of those are suffering from Type 2 diabetes, which can usually be controlled by diet, exercise and drugs. Undiagnosed Type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes causes the sufferer to fall suddenly and acutely ill as a result of a dangerously high blood sugar level. Early diagnosis is therefore essential. So are you diabetic? Assess your risk factor by answering our-specially selected questions: count up the a, b and c totals, then find out what your score reveals. 1 Are you overweight? a) No, I am a standard size for my age and height; b) I am about a stone-and-a- half overweight; c) Yes. I am clinically obese (waist size: female - 34 in, male - 40 in). 2 Are there, or have there ever been, diabetics in your family? a) There are no recorded cases; b) Yes, but not a sibling or a parent; c) Yes. My father/mother/ sister/brother has diabetes. 3 Do you feel excessively thirsty all the time? a) No. I only get thirsty when I am hot or eating something salty; b) I have started to drink more and sometimes I am woken by thirst at night; c) I wake up thirsty every night and often feel thirsty during the day. 4 Are you passing large amounts of urine? a) Only when I have drunk a large amount; b) Sometimes the need to pass urine wakes me at night; c) I now wake up every night needing to urinate and I pass large amounts during the day. 5 Have you noticed significant changes to your vision? a) My vision is pretty stable with no dramatic changes in my powers of focus; b) My vision is less focused than it used to be; c) My visio Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Common symptoms of low blood sugar are: Feeling dizzy, shaky, or lightheaded Feeling nervous or anxious Having a fast heart beat Sweating Continue reading >>

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia can be a very serious condition, with extreme cases causing seizures, coma, and even death. It occurs when blood sugar levels drop too low, and it is most often experienced by people with diabetes. As you learn about diabetes management, being well versed in low blood sugar symptoms will enable you to detect the signs of impending hypoglycemia and act quickly to head it off or minimize its impact. Diabetes Type and Hypoglycemia Risk Hypoglycemia risk varies across the three different types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia most often, as their diabetes management often requires a lot of attention and careful planning. The average person with type 1 diabetes who is attempting aggressive disease control may still experience low blood sugar symptoms frequently, and a full-blown case of hypoglycemia will require close medical attention. "When it comes to type 1 diabetes, the body can't make insulin on its own, so it must be administered," notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, Everyday Health contributor and author of Belly Fat for Dummies. Paying close attention to your diet is important, too. "If the correct amount of insulin is given based on the amount of carbohydrates consumed, blood sugar levels can remain in a healthy range." Type 2 Diabetes These patients experience hypoglycemia less frequently than people with type 1 diabetes; the rate of hypoglycemia for type 2 diabetes patients taking insulin is about one-third that of type 1 diabetes patients. But research shows that the frequency of hypoglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes increases as the disease becomes more advanced. "In people with type 2 diabetes, the body may produce adequate insulin, yet the cells are resistant to it, making the insulin ineffecti Continue reading >>

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Thought the only sign of being diabetic is being overweight? Think again... Around 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes, yet according to Diabetes UK, around 590,000 suffer - but they don't even know about it. And while diabetes - a lifelong condition - can be successfully managed once it’s diagnosed, delaying that diagnosis puts people at risk of serious complications, including amputation and blindness. This is a key concern for Type 2 diabetes, the type associated with weight which accounts for around 90% of all cases. Type 2 occurs when the body can no longer make enough insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas which enables us to use sugar/glucose), or the insulin being produced isn’t doing its job properly. Type 1, on the other hand, has absolutely nothing to do with weight or lifestyle and tends to develop during childhood when a fault in the body causes insulin-producing cells to be destroyed. “The symptoms of Type 1 and Type 2 are very similar, however they tend to come on a lot quicker in Type 1, and you can end up very poorly and in hospital if not diagnosed straight away,” says Diabetes UK clinical advisor Libby Dowling. “Type 2 is a little different. A lot of people put the symptoms of Type 2 down to getting older, and the condition can sometimes go undiagnosed for up to 10 years, by which time complications could have started to develop.” [Read more: Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 - Do you know the difference?] But, aside from increased thirst, needing to be more and tiredness, what are those symptoms? Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Continue reading >>

More in diabetes