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Diabetes Facts 2017

Fast Facts

Fast Facts

Each year since 1984, the West Virginia Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System has measured a range of risk factors that can affect our health. This report presents state survey results for the year 2015 as well as county data combined for the latest available five years (2011 through 2015). The survey is conducted by telephone and represents a collaborative effort between the West Virginia Health Statistics Center (WVHSC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. Standardized survey methods are provided by the CDC. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, and several U.S. territories now participate in the system, known as the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The information in this document serves as a resource for governments, business leaders, schools, and community groups, all of which are helping to shape the health of West Virginia. ​Health Status West Virginia had the highest prevalence in the nation of adults reporting fair or poor health (25.9%). Approximately 18.6% reported poor physical health for at least 14 days in the past 30 days 15.6% reported poor mental health at least 14 days in the past 30 days. Prediabetes Prevalence of prediabetes – 9.7% (over 1 in 11 or about 119,848 adults) Prevalence of high blood pressure among those with prediabetes – 64.0% Prevalence of overweight or obese among those with prediabetes – 83.1% Prevalence of physical inactivity among those with prediabetes – 35.6% ​Weight Status The prevalence of obesity in West Virginia was 35.6%, the fourth highest in the nation. More than two-thirds (71.1%) of West Virginia adults were either overweight or obese, highest in the U.S. ​​Diabetes More than 1 in 7 West Virginia adults had diabetes (14.5%) which ranked West Virgin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

6 Facts About Treating Diabetes In Africa

6 Facts About Treating Diabetes In Africa

Diabetes is a serious chronic disease that occurs due to the body’s inability to produce insulin, which regulates sugar levels in the body (Type 1), or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces (Type 2). A recent report by the World Health Organization (WHO) found that the global prevalence of diabetes has nearly doubled since 1980, rising from 4.7 percent to 8.5 percent. This trend is particularly troubling, as diabetes prevalence has risen faster in low and middle-income countries. In many of these countries, diabetes is an added burden to states already struggling to deal with weak economies, weak health systems and significant infectious disease burdens. This is especially true for African countries. Here are six facts about diabetes in Africa: The prevalence of diabetes in African adults has more than doubled since the 1980s. The International Diabetes Federation estimates that more than 14 million people in Africa live with the disease and if trends continue this figure could grow to 34 million by 2040. The increase in diabetes (Type 2) cases in Africa is largely attributed to changing lifestyles. A large percentage of people with diabetes (58 percent) live in cities. Traditional diets are changing to more high-calorie refined carbohydrates and fats which are more readily accessible and affordable than healthier options. Occupational patterns are also changing leading to physical inactivity and a more sedentary lifestyle. Most African countries have healthcare systems already struggling to keep up with other illnesses like HIV, tuberculosis, malaria and diarrheal diseases, all of which seem more pressing than diabetes. As a result, Africa has the highest percentage of undiagnosed people (an estimated two-thirds) who are at a higher risk of dev Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017: 12 Shocking Diabetes Facts Every Indian Should Know!

World Diabetes Day 2017: 12 Shocking Diabetes Facts Every Indian Should Know!

Although we are marginally better than the West when it comes to cancer, the harsh reality is that we are officially facing a "diabetes epidemic" in India. With 62 million diabetics in the country (15 percent of the population), India already holds the dubious reputation of being the diabetes capital of the world. A combination of factors such as diet, lifestyle and genetics make us more prone to the disease than the others. On World Diabetes day, here are twelve shocking facts about diabetes every Indian needs to know. Although diabetes affects the ones living in the urban and rural areas, the worst affected ones in India are the middle class, especially those living in the cities. Diabetes has been increasingly affecting the youth of India. People as young as age 20 can be diagnosed with the disorder. According to the study conducted by Indian Council of Medical Research, 63.9 percent of the youth below the age of 25 has type 1 diabetes and 25.3 percent have type 2 diabetes. Diabetes incidence is India is becoming more prevalent among the youth in India. But more disturbingly, on an average, Indians tend to get diabetes 10 years before their western counterparts according to a UK study. Around 77.2 million people in India already have pre-diabetes, a precursor to diabetes in which your blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not enough to be considered diabetes. Compared to Caucasians, Indian Asians already have a genetic predisposition to diabetes, which increases their risk of insulin resistance. According to the Chennai Urban Population Study, if both your parents are diabetic, your risk of diabetes is as high as 55 percent. According to a 2013 report by National Program for Prevention and Control of Cancer, Diabetes, CDV and Stroke (NPCDCS), South Indians ar Continue reading >>

10 Curious Facts About Diabetes

10 Curious Facts About Diabetes

Diabetes is a condition wherein the body is unable to regulate itself, either by producing insufficient amounts of insulin or proving resistant to insulin. It has a laundry list of horrible side effects, not limited to amputations and blindness, and numbers are at an all-time high. Although linked to obesity, diabetes affects people of all body types, many who barely have enough to eat. According to the International Diabetes Federation, around 382 million people in the world are afflicted, a number they estimate will rise to 592 million by 2035. While medications and careful health management can greatly prolong life, in places like sub-Saharan Africa where such resources are limited, 75 percent of diabetes deaths occur in people under the age of 60. 10 Whiskey Diabetes mellitus literally means “sweet urine,” as those with the disease tend to pass a great deal of sugar when they pee. Before modern testing methods, doctors would actually taste a patient’s urine if they suspected the person had diabetes. Luckily, those days have passed, but bizarrely enough, people continue to drink the urine of diabetics. James Gilpin of London produces “Gilpin Family Whiskey,” which takes the urine of elderly diabetes patients and filters it, then adds it to mash. The sugar in the urine begins the fermentation process, and within a few weeks, a perfectly serviceable whiskey is produced—though Gilpin claims it is better if aged awhile in the bottle. Gilpin Family Whiskey is not sold; rather, it is freely distributed as a “public health statement.” 9 Wilford Brimley If anyone could be considered the “face” of diabetes, it would be Wilford Brimley. Known for his portrayals of gruff, stodgy old men, Brimley has been in dozens of films, including The Natural, Cocoon, and Continue reading >>

Facts & Statistics About Diabetes

Facts & Statistics About Diabetes

Hundreds of millions of people worldwide suffer from diabetes, a disease that affects the body’s ability to manage blood glucose levels. A very serious condition, diabetes can lead to additional health problems including kidney failure, blindness, heart disease, amputations and death. In the United States, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is an agency that provides extensive information about Diabetes and other diseases, including research updates. To date, researchers have been able to identify genetics and “triggers” that cause diabetes, but prevention has yet to be determined. Diabetes – Facts & Statistics Diabetes is a serious medical condition that affects millions of people worldwide. In 2014, reports indicated that globally, about 422 million adults suffered from diabetes, up from 108 million in 1980. This is a rise proportionally in adults from 4.7% to 8.5%. It also was the cause of death for over 1.5 million people in 2012. For that same year in the United States, it was estimated that 29.1 million people have diabetes, representing about 9.3% of the population. This total represents 21 million diagnosed cases, but another 8.1 million people who have diabetes remain undiagnosed or treated. Since many people either will have to deal with this disease themselves or they will know others with diabetes, it is important to learn more about it. There are ways to reduce the severity of the effects of diabetes, and to help your body deal with sugar/glucose blood levels effectively. YouTube Special Feature Basic Issues of Diabetes To understand how diabetes affects health, start with the basic issues of this disease and how these issues can become detrimental. The blood stream circulates around the body, taking and removing important elements Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 diabetes can also be called insulin-dependent diabetes because people with type 1 must take insulin in order to live. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile diabetes because it was diagnosed mainly in children. However, that name is no longer accurate because children are increasingly developing another type of diabetes—type 2 diabetes. Also, it is possible for adults to be diagnosed as type 1, so the name “juvenile diabetes” isn’t accurate. Researchers aren’t exactly sure what causes type 1 diabetes, although they have some clues, including genetics and environmental triggers. Researchers have noticed that more cases of type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in northern climates, leading them to suggest that environmental triggers play a role in the development of type 1. Specifically, viral infections (which happen more often in colder northern climates where people are in close proximity) may trigger type 1. Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2: about 90% of people with diabetes have type 2. With tight blood glucose control, you can avoid many of the short- and long-term complications associated with type 1 diabetes, including foot problems and nerve pain. Exercise is an important part of keeping diabetes under control. Many famous people have type 1 diabetes, including: Jay Cutler (quarterback for the Chicago Bears), Billie Jean King, Ron Santo (Chicago Cubs player), Halle Berry, Mary Tyler Moore, and Nick Jonas. Type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) is more common than type 1 diabetes. Around 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the US population have diabetes. T Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Singapore: Here Are Facts Based On What The Government Has Documented

Diabetes In Singapore: Here Are Facts Based On What The Government Has Documented

DIABETES IN SINGAPORE – AS REPORTED & DOCUMENTED Following up from my last post (Thanks everyone for the colourful comments! It was a cracker to read! Didn’t think such a post would have gathered such traction), here are the facts based on what the government has documented. This time, I’ll use 2013 statistics (2016/2017 statistics last I checked weren’t ready yet). ‘The majority of adults with self-reported diabetes were men (53.3%) and almost two-thirds (65.2%) were Chinese. More than three-quarters (81.2%) had an educational level of secondary/GCE O/N level and below. Slightly more than half (54.8%) were not working. One-quarter (26.3%) of these self reported diabetic adults resided in HDB 1-3 room flats. The mean age of onset of diabetes reported by these diabetic adults was 50 years old. The mean duration of diabetics reported was 11 years. Four in five (80.9%) were currently on oral hypoglycemic agents.’ ‘One in five (19.3%) of the adults with self-reported diabetes were obese.’ ‘Almost two-thirds (65.3%) of the adults with self-reported diabetes did not participate in any physical activity during leisure time, compared with 48.3% of the general population. Top reasons for not doing so were: 1 – No time due to work or family commitments (36.3%) 2 – Too old (19.6%) 3 – Poor health (18.4%)’ Okay, so why did diabetes made it to NDR 2017? This is probably why. ‘The Ministry of Health (MOH) has declared war on diabetes to stem a healthcare threat that is costing the Government more than $1 billion annually. This figure could rise to $2.5 billion in 2050 after taking into account both medical costs as well as indirect costs such as loss of productivity and premature mortality.’ So much so that a ‘Diabetes Prevention & Care Task Force’ h Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Contents What is diabetes? How can you get it? What problems does it cause? What happens next? How to help your friend What some kids who live with diabetes say Did you know? What is diabetes? Diabetes happens when someone's body does not have enough insulin. A car needs fuel to give it the energy to keep working. Our bodies need fuel to give them the energy to keep working. We get the fuel from our food. Carbohydrates in food get changed into glucose, the main energy that our bodies use. This change happens in our gut and in our liver. Enzymes help this change (they are not the same enzymes as the ones in washing powder). These enzymes come from several different parts of our body including the pancreas [say pan-kree-ass]. The glucose travels around our bodies inside blood vessels but it cannot be used as energy until it gets into our body cells. Insulin is the key that lets the glucose go through the cell wall into our cells. Insulin is a hormone. If there is not enough insulin there can be a lot of glucose travelling around in the blood, but the cells do not have enough energy to work well, which makes people sick. Lots of small clumps of cells in the pancreas make insulin. These cells are called 'islets' because they are like little islands in the pancreas. The rest of the pancreas makes enzymes. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Children and young people usually get type 1, sometimes called 'juvenile diabetes'. (Juvenile [say joo-ven-ile is a word that means child or young person). People who get diabetes when they are older usually get type 2 diabetes. But more young people are getting Type 2 diabetes because they are overweight or obese. Dogs can get diabetes too! How can you get it? Type 1 diabetes happens when the 'islet' cells in the pan Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017: Facts, Figures And What To Know About Prevention

World Diabetes Day 2017: Facts, Figures And What To Know About Prevention

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is held every year on Nov. 14 in an effort to raise awareness on the condition and help combat the increasing rates of diabetes across the world. For those who may still be unsure about the health risks posed by diabetes, here we round up some important facts and figures from the World Health Organisation (WHO), including how the disease can be prevented. Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, the hormone that regulates blood sugar, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by deficient insulin production and requires daily administration of insulin. The cause of type 1 diabetes is not known and it is not currently preventable. Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes may occur suddenly and include excessive excretion of urine (polyuria), thirst (polydipsia), constant hunger, weight loss, vision changes and fatigue. Type 2 diabetes results from the body’s ineffective use of insulin. Type 2 diabetes comprises the majority of people with diabetes around the world, and is largely the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes may be similar to those of type 1 diabetes, but are often less noticeable. As a result, it can go undiagnosed for several years, and sometimes after the condition has already caused further complications. Diabetes is on the rise across the world, with the number of people living with the condition rising from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014. The global prevalence of diabetes among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7 percent in 1980 to 8.5 percent in 2014. Until recently, type 2 diabetes was seen only in adults but it is now also occurring increasingly frequently Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Facts, Statistics, And You

Diabetes: Facts, Statistics, And You

Diabetes is a group of diseases that involve high blood sugar levels. It can lead to serious complications, including heart disease, stroke, and blindness. Source: Diabetes: Facts, Statistics, and You Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Facts And Figures

Diabetes: Facts And Figures

Quick Facts 40% of Wisconsin adults are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime.1 8% of Wisconsin adults have diabetes.2 28% of Wisconsin adults have diabetes and don't know it.3 37% of Wisconsin adults have prediabetes.3 Approximately 356,000 adults and 6,500 children and adolescents in Wisconsin have been diagnosed with diabetes.2,4,5 It is estimated that an additional 138,000 have diabetes but are undiagnosed.3 The direct (medical care) and indirect (lost productivity) costs of diabetes in Wisconsin total an estimated $3.9 billion annually.6 Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.7 What is diabetes? According to the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. Diabetes can cause serious health complications including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. The three main types of diabetes are: type 1 diabetes (link is external), type 2 diabetes (link is external), and gestational diabetes (link is external). Another condition called prediabetes (link is external) is almost always a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Modest behavior changes can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people who have prediabetes. More Facts and Figures For diabetes data on the national, state, and county levels, see the CDC Data and Statisti Continue reading >>

How Many People Have Diabetes?

How Many People Have Diabetes?

Rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing globally. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Diabetes Atlas, here are the overall rates including both type 1 and type 2: 415 million adults have diabetes (1 in 11 adults) By 2040, 642 million adults (1 in 10 adults) are expected to have diabetes 46.5% of those with diabetes have not been diagnosed 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes 12% of global health expenditure is spent on diabetes ($673 billion) You can see an interactive map of global diabetes statistics at the IDF website. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the most current data is for 2012 (source): 29 million people in the United States (9.3 percent) have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with type or type 2 diabetes in 2012. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults are about twice as likely to have diagnosed with some form of diabetes as non-Hispanic white adults. 208,000 people younger than 20 years have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 86 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. The percentage of U.S. adults with prediabetes is similar for non-Hispanic whites (35 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (39 percent), and Hispanics (38 percent). Similar data is available from a study called Prevalence and Incidence Trends for Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 to 79 Years, United States, 1980-2012 published in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This study found that 49% to 52% of the adult population had either diabetes or prediabetes. Then came the most stunning number: 83% of adults over 65 have either diabetes or prediabetes! Thankfully, the authors of this s Continue reading >>

7 Facts About World Diabetes Day

7 Facts About World Diabetes Day

WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some fac Continue reading >>

64 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

64 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

The word “diabetes” is Greek for “siphon,” which refers to the copious urine of uncontrolled diabetes. “Mellitus” is Latin for “honey” or “sweet,” a name added when physicians discovered that the urine from people with diabetes is sweet with glucose.[8] Scientists predict that there may be 30 million new cases of diabetes in China alone by 2025.[1] The earliest recorded mention of a disease that can be recognized as diabetes is found in the Ebers papyrus (1500 B.C.), which includes directions for several mixtures that could “remove the urine, which runs too often.”[1] The name “diabetes” is attributed to the famed Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia who practiced in the first century A.D. He believed that diabetes was caused by snakebite.[1] William Cullen (1710-1790), a professor of chemistry and medicine in Scotland, is responsible for adding the term “mellitus” (“sweet” or “honey-like”) to the word diabetes.[1] Insulin was coined from the Latin insula (“island”) because the hormone is secreted by the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas.[9] In 1889, Oskar Minkowski (1858-191931) discovered the link between diabetes and the pancreas (pan - “all” + kreas - “flesh) when a dog from which he removed the pancreas developed diabetes.[1] Before the discovery of insulin, surgeons rarely operated on diabetic patients with gangrene because the patients typically would not heal and would inevitably die. On occasion, an area of gangrene would “auto-amputate,” meaning it would dry up and fall off.[1] Before the discovery of insulin in 1921, physicians would often put their patients on starvation or semi-starvation diets, recommending they eat only foods such as oatmeal.[1] In 1996, a 16-year-old girl with diabetes died at he Continue reading >>

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