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Diabetes Fact Sheet For Patients

Diabetes Fact Sheet

Diabetes Fact Sheet

The Big D: defeating diabetes through diet By Veronika Powell (formerly Charvatova) MSc, Viva!Health Campaigner As diabetes continues to spread all over the world, it is essential that an effective approach to its prevention and treatment is adopted. Current mainstream recommendations are not powerful enough and medication does not treat the condition. Diabetes mellitus is a health condition characterised by high levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood, which the body cannot use properly and eventually excretes in the urine (together with a lot of water). It is caused either by the pancreas not producing hormone insulin (or not enough of it) or by the body cells’ inability to react to insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas and acts as a key that lets glucose into the body’s cells. Glucose is a vital source of energy for the cells and thus the main fuel for the body’s processes. It comes from digesting carbohydrate and it’s also partially produced by the liver. Carbohydrates are the main nutrient in healthy foods such as wholegrain or rye bread, pasta, oats, brown rice, pulses (beans, peas, and lentils), sweet potatoes, and in not so healthy foods such as white bread, cakes, sweets and other sugary foods. If the body cannot use glucose as a source of energy, it uses fat instead but this inevitably disturbs biochemical balance of the body and leads to further health complications. Symptoms of diabetes include tiredness, irritability, nausea, hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, tingling sensations in the hands and feet and dry, itchy skin. Numbers skyrocketing In 1985 an estimated 30 million people worldwide had diabetes; a decade later this figure had increased to 135 million and by 2000 an estimated 171 million people had diabetes. It is predicted that at l Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity: Twin Epidemics

Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity: Twin Epidemics

Overview Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95% of the 25.8 million diabetes cases in the U.S1 Obesity is a major independent risk factor for developing the disease, and more than 90% of type 2 diabetics are overweight or obese2 Modest weight loss, as little as 5% of total body weight, can help to improve type 2 diabetes in patients who are overweight or obese3 Metabolic and bariatric surgery may result in resolution or improvement of type 2 diabetes independent of weight loss4 Prevalence Diabetes affects 8.3% of the total U.S. population (25.8 million people)5 18.8 million people have been diagnosed 7 million people are unaware they suffer from the disease About 95% of the diabetes population has type 2 diabetes6 Increases in type 2 diabetes cases across the country associated with higher obesity rates and rising age of population7 More than one-third (35.7%) of adults are obese; rate nearly tripled between 1960-20109 While children and adolescents are increasingly being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the CDC notes is it difficult to estimate the disease’s prevalence in this population because it can go undiagnosed for long periods of time10, 11 The rise in diabetes diagnoses is attributed to increasing childhood obesity rates, which have tripled since the 1980s, with approximately 17% (or 12.5 million) of children aged 2-19 suffering from obesity12 African-Americans and the elderly are disproportionately affected by diabetes13 18.7% of all African-Americans over twenty years old have diabetes, compared to 10.2% of whites 26.9% of Americans age 65 and older have diabetes, compared to 11.3% of adults over 20 Pre-Diabetes About 79 million Americans, or 35% of people 20 or older have pre-diabetes,14 while half of adults over 65 are affected by the disease15 Up to 70% of pati Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (1). The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014 (1). Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**. Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030 (1). Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2015, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths. Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is characterized by deficient insulin production and Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes resistant to or doesn’t produce enough insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas gland and allows sugar to enter the cells of the body to produce energy. The disease accounts for up to 90 per cent of adult diabetes cases in Australia but is rare in children and teenagers. It can lead to a range of short- and long-term health problems. Risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes include: lifestyle factors – the majority of cases occur in young people who are severely overweight and do not exercise enough genetics – if other close members of the family have type 2 diabetes then your child is more likely to develop this condition cultural background – type 2 diabetes is more common in people from Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander, Asian sub-continent and Chinese backgrounds. Other forms of diabetes include type 1 diabetes, gestational diabetes (occurs during pregnancy) and rare types that develop as a result of various genetic disorders. Signs and symptoms Type 2 diabetes develops over a long period of time and often there are no symptoms. However, in addition to being overweight, signs and symptoms may include: dark skin in the armpit and back of the neck tiredness excessive thirst passing more urine than normal. What is the treatment? Type 2 diabetes is a serious illness that can be managed through: weight loss regular exercise to help the insulin to work more effectively. medication (metformin or insulin) to help lower the blood sugar level Type 2 diabetes in the young is a serious condition associated with the early appearance of complications in the kidney and later the eye and circulatory system. However, unlike most other types of diabetes, the progression of type 2 diabetes can be reversed o Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 2

Diabetes, Type 2

YESTERDAY No proven strategies existed to prevent the disease or its complications. The only ways to treat diabetes were the now-obsolete forms of insulin from cows and pigs, and drugs that stimulate insulin release from the beta cells of the pancreas (sulfonylureas). Both of these therapies cause dangerous low blood sugar reactions and weight gain. Patients monitored their glucose levels with urine tests, which recognized high but not dangerously low glucose levels and reflected past, not current, glucose levels. More reliable methods for testing glucose levels in the blood had not been developed yet. While scientists knew that genes played a role (i.e., the disease often runs in families), they had not identified any specific culprit genes. National efforts were not being made to combat obesity—a serious risk factor for the disease. Fewer people developed type 2 diabetes compared to today because overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity were not pervasive. Patients were almost exclusively adults—the reason that the disease was formerly called “adult onset diabetes.” It was rare in children or young adults. TODAY Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. The NIH-funded Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) clinical trial (found a lifestyle intervention (modest weight loss of 5 to 7 percent of body weight and 30 minutes of exercise 5 times weekly) reduced the risk of getting type 2 diabetes by 58 percent in a diverse population of over 3000 adults at high risk for diabetes. In another arm of the study, the drug metformin reduced development of diabetes by 31 percent. Based on the DPP findings, the National Diabetes Education Program developed the education campaign, “Small Steps. Big Rewards. Prevent Type 2 Diabetes.” to help people at high risk take the Continue reading >>

Resource Of The Month: Patient Fact Sheet On Controlling Diabetes

Resource Of The Month: Patient Fact Sheet On Controlling Diabetes

Resource of the Month: Patient fact sheet on controlling diabetes This new resource from the APA Practice Directorate is one of several fact sheets for patients and the public on a variety of topics. Taking Control of Your Diabetes: How Psychologists Help with Diabetes Management is the latest fact sheet available free to APA members from the APA Practice Directorate. This fact sheet educates patients, clients and other health care practitioners on the roles psychologists can play in helping patients change their behaviors and learn effective strategies to manage their diabetes. Download the Taking Control of Your Diabetes: How Psychologists Help with Diabetes Management fact sheet (PDF, 276KB). The APA Practice Directorates public education campaign offers a variety of other fact sheets for patients, clients and consumers on a variety of topics such as depression, eating disorders and anxiety. Additional fact sheets are available in the Public Education and Outreach section of the APA Practice Organizations Practice Central website. APA members can also visit the Psychology Help Center at apa.org to order up to 50 free copies at a time of selected brochures and fact sheets. These publications may be reproduced in their entirety without modification. Members are encouraged to use these materials as appropriate for client and public education. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fact Sheet | California's Stem Cell Agency

Diabetes Fact Sheet | California's Stem Cell Agency

CIRM funds many projects seeking to better understand diabetes and to translate those discoveries into new therapies. Diabetes comes in two forms: type 1 (also known as juvenile) and type 2 (also known as adult). Approximately 1.25million people in the U.S. have type 1 diabetes, which is the form primarily being targeted by stem cell research. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder where the bodys own immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that make the hormone insulin. Insulin normally circulates in the bloodstream after a meal and allows cells of the body to take up sugar and use it for food. Without insulin, cells starve and the sugar builds up in the bloodstream where it can damage the kidneys, blood vessels and retina. Any potential cure for type 1 diabetes requires replacing the lost insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. Currently, the only cells that can be used for such a transplant come from donated organs, which are in short supply. Such insulin-producing cell transplants are also risky because the cells can be rejected by the recipients body if they dont receive immune suppressing drugs. To solve the first problem, groups of CIRM-funded researchers have developed methods to make replacement insulin-producing cells derived from human embryonic stem cells, which can be grown in large amounts. Implanted into mice and rats these cells are able to regulate blood sugar. To get around the problem of rejection, CIRM-funded teams have placed donor progenitor cells in a device that implants under the skin and shields the cells from the patient's immune system. Other groups are studying how to regulate the immune system to make stem cell-derived transplants safer. Caladriusis targeting the immune system as an alternative strategy for treating patients w Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications Fact Sheet

Oral Diabetes Medications Fact Sheet

Summa Health System developed this fact sheet for patients who need to take oral medicine to manage their diabetes. Care providers give it to patients during diabetes planned visits, and it is part of the Diabetes Planned Visit Notebook. Oral Diabetes Medications Family Medicine Center of Akron Copyright © 2006 American Diabetes Association Adapted from the ADA Patient Information The first treatment for type 2 diabetes is often meal planning for blood glucose (sugar) control, weight loss, and exercising. Sometimes these measures are not enough to bring blood glucose levels down near the normal range. The next step is taking a medicine that lowers blood glucose levels. How they work In people with diabetes, blood glucose levels are too high. These high levels occur because glucose remains in the blood rather than entering cells, where it belongs. But for glucose to pass into a cell, insulin must be present and the cell must be "hungry" for glucose. People with type 1 diabetes don't make insulin. For them, insulin shots are the only way to keep blood glucose levels down. People with type 2 diabetes tend to have two problems: they don't make quite enough insulin and the cells of their bodies don't seem to take in glucose as eagerly as they should. All diabetes pills sold today in the United States are members of five classes of drugs: sulfonylureas, meglitinides, biguanides, thiazolidinediones, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. These five classes of drugs work in different ways to lower blood glucose levels. Can diabetes pills help me? Only people with type 2 diabetes can use pills to manage their diabetes. These pills work best when used with meal planning and exercise. This way you have three therapies working together to lower your blood glucose levels. Diabetes pills Continue reading >>

My Diabetes

My Diabetes

This section provides information on diabetes, the different types and what to consider when managing diabetes, as well as specific information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and carers of people with diabetes. There is also more general health and wellbeing information, covering topics such as nutrition, exercise, travel and more. The information in this section is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice or used to alter medical therapy. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs. When someone has diabetes, the body cant maintain healthy levels of glucose in the blood. Glucose, which is a form of sugar, is the main source of energy for our bodies. It comes from foods we eat such as breads, cereals, fruit, starchy vegetables, legumes, milk, yoghurt and sweets. Glucose can also be made by your liver for times when youre not eating, like overnight. Glucose is carried around the body in the blood stream. The levels of blood glucose are controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. As glucose enters the blood stream, the pancreas releases more insulin. The role of insulin is to help glucose go from the blood stream into the cells, such as your muscles, where it is needed for energy. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas cant make insulin, or when there is not enough insulin, or insulin cant work effectively. In this section, you will find information on diabetes, printable fact sheets, and a list of useful links. Diabetes information is targeted by type of diabetes, as well as being directed toward specific groups such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, culturally and linguistically diverse communities and carers for people with Continue reading >>

Tag: National Diabetes Fact Sheet

Tag: National Diabetes Fact Sheet

The Problem: Diabetes Affects Diverse Communities Disproportionately Every 17 seconds, someone is diagnosed with diabetes, and the impact of this chronic disease goes much further than the patients’ afflictions. Moreover, diabetes disproportionately affects diverse communities, especially African Americans and Hispanics. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, Hispanics are 66% more likely and African Americans are 77% more likely to develop diabetes throughout their lives. Given that the risk of diabetes increases with age, African American and Latino seniors are even more predisposed to diabetes and its complications as they reach their golden years. Overall, these two groups are far more likely to die from diabetes complications than non-Hispanic Whites. Finding Solutions: NHCOA Research The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) conducted a comprehensive research from 2005-2007 into the barriers keeping Hispanic older adults from effective diabetes management, as well as to identify the factors that some of the Latinos who are handling diabetes successfully find helpful. NHCOA’s research also focused on both Hispanic and non-Hispanic healthcare providers working with the Hispanic community – doctors, community-based nurses and clinicians, lay health workers, and others – to determine what works and what does not work in efforts to increase compliance rates. Finding Solutions: NHCOA Public Health Intervention and Cultural Competency Course NHCOA’s research gave way to the development and implementation of a public health intervention sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Walmart Foundation that aimed to reduce diabetes health disparities between Hispanic and non-Hispanic adults in the U.S. by helping delay the onset of diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Quick Facts

Diabetes Quick Facts

The Big Picture More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. More than 84 million US adults—over a third—have prediabetes, and 90% of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States (and may be underreported). Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes; type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5%. In the last 20 years, the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has more than tripled as the American population has aged and become more overweight or obese. Risk You’re at risk for developing prediabetes or type 2 diabetes if you: Are overweight Are age 45 or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant) or given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. American Indians/Alaska Natives are twice as likely as whites to have diabetes. During their lifetime, half of all Hispanic men and women and non-Hispanic black women are predicted to develop diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an immune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake). Known risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Family history (having a parent, brother, sister with type 1 diabetes) Age (it’s more likely to develop in children, teens, and young adults) In the United States, whites are more likely to develop type 1 diabetes than African Americans and Hispanic/Latino Americans. You’re at risk for developing gestational diabetes (diabetes w Continue reading >>

Diabetes Statistics

Diabetes Statistics

Press Releases In the News DRI tv Publications images & Video D-Stats Diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in the United States. According to the CDCs (Centers for Disease Control) National Diabetes Statistics Report for 2017 cases of diabetes have risen to an estimated 30.3 million. Below is a summary of the latest diabetes statistics included in the CDCs report. 30.3 million people, or 9.4% of the U.S. population, have diabetes. An estimated 23.1 million people - or 7.2% of the population - had diagnosed diabetes. Approximately 7.2 million people have diabetes but have not yet been diagnosed (All ages, 2015). Diabetes impacts all social, economic, and ethnic backgrounds. Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, affecting approximately 1.5 million people. New Cases of Diabetes in Adults and Children In 2015, an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among U.S. adults aged 18 years or older. This includes approximately 193,000 children and adolescents younger than age 20 years. During 2011-2012, the estimated annual number of newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes in the U.S. included 17,900 children and adolescents younger than age 20*. The annual number of children and adolescents age 10 - 19 years diagnosed with type 2 diabetes was 5,300*. Diabetes can affect many parts of the body and is associated with serious complications, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-limb amputation, among other conditions. In 2014, a total of 7.2 million hospital discharges were reported with diabetes as any listed diagnosis among U.S. adults aged 18 years or older. 1.5 million discharges for major cardiovascular diseases, including 400,000 for ischemic heart disease and 251,000 for stroke 108,0 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Fact Sheet

Diabetes Mellitus Fact Sheet

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects nearly 26 million Americans, 7 million of whom have not been diagnosed1 Another 79 million adults age 20 and older have prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are elevated but not yet in the range for diabetes.1 Most dont know they have it. If prediabetes is not proactively managed, it can progress to diabetes within a decade Every 17 seconds in the United States, someone is diagnosed with diabetes.2 The number of Americans with diabetes is rising at an alarming rate; the percentage diagnosed with diabetes has more than doubled since 19803 A projected 1 out of 3 US children will develop diabetes in their lifetime4 Diabetes is considered a gateway disease because it tends to lead to a host of serious health conditions and complications It is the leading cause of blindness, kidney disease, and nontraumatic amputations among working-age adults, and is a major cause of heart disease and stroke1 Diabetes also has been linked to depression, Alzheimers disease, and several other neurological conditions1 The risk of developing diabetes increases with age and is affected by race/ethnicity1 In 2010, more than 75% of the 40.2 million seniors living in the United States had either diabetes or prediabetes1 Specific ethnic populations are also at elevated risk: People in Hispanic, African American, and Native American communities in the United States are disproportionately affected by diabetes Diabetes can shorten life span by about 4 to 23 years depending on age, gender, and ethnicity.2 The risk of death among people with diabetes is twice that of people of similar age without diabetes1 Although ranked as the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control estimates that diabetes is vastly Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sports Special Needs Factsheet

Diabetes And Sports Special Needs Factsheet

Diabetes and Sports Special Needs Factsheet Diabetes affects how the body uses glucose, the main type of sugar in the blood. Glucose an important source of energy for the body's cells comes from the foods we eat. Glucose is carried to the cells through the bloodstream. Several hormones, including insulin, control glucose levels in the blood. When a person has diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly. Exercise makes insulin work better in the body, which helps people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels in a healthier range. But when kids with diabetes exercise, they can experience low blood sugar, called hypoglycemia , or high blood sugar, called hyperglycemia . Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) can happen during or after exercise, when the body has used up much of its stored sugar, especially if insulin levels in the body are still high after an insulin injection. Signs of hypoglycemia include extreme hunger, tremors, rapid heart rate, cold sweat, pale-gray skin color, headache, moodiness or irritability, drowsiness or dizziness, blurred or double vision, confusion, seizures, or loss of consciousness. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels) can happen during sports and exercise because the muscles need more energy and the body responds by releasing extra glucose into the bloodstream. If the body doesn't have enough insulin to use the glucose, then the sugar will stay in the blood, which can cause increased urination and dehydration. Other signs of hyperglycemia include excessive thirst, fatigue, weakness, and blurry vision. Students with diabetes who play sports may: need to monitor blood sugar levels several times a day, as well as before and after playing sports or practicing take insulin injections or wear an insulin pump Continue reading >>

Educational Materials For Your Patients

Educational Materials For Your Patients

Curated for the diabetes care partner, this set provides basic information about diabetes, clarifies the partner's role in caring for someone with the disease, and explains the importance of taking good care of themselves. Continue reading >>

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