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Experts Recommend A More Personal Approach To Type 2 Diabetes

Experts Recommend A More Personal Approach To Type 2 Diabetes

Experts recommend a more personal approach to type 2 diabetes Chief Medical Editor, Harvard Health Publishing For many people with types 2 diabetes, and their doctors, managing this vexing condition has been all about the numbers. One number, to be precise: the hemoglobin A1c reading. Its a measure of the average blood sugar level over the preceding three months. New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommend taking a more patient-centered approach to managing type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when a persons muscle cells stop responding to insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas. You can think of insulin as a tiny molecular key that opens the door through which glucose (blood sugar) flows into cells. When muscle cells resist insulins open up signal, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. Over time, this harms tissues throughout the body, from the brain to the toes. It can damage nerves, rob vision, and cause heart disease. A simple way to check blood sugar is to measure the percentage of hemoglobin molecules (the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells) that have become coated with glucose. This is known as the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test. The higher the average daily blood sugar over a three-month period, the higher the HbA1c value. People who dont have diabetes have HbA1C readings below 5.7%. For years, the American Diabetes Association recommended that almost everyone with type 2 diabetes should aim for an HbA1c level less than 7%. Keeping blood sugar as low as possible, called tight control, was thought to limit the havoc caused by diabetes. But a series of studies have shown that tight control for people who have had diabetes for many years doesnt improve quality of life or longevity Continue reading >>

Experts For Media - Diabetes

Experts For Media - Diabetes

Director of the Clinical Diabetes Program - Montefiore Hospital, Montefiore Medical Center Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Dr. Louard was recruited to the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, GA to build a program in Diabetes. While there, she was Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of the Comprehensive Diabetes Care Center for Medical College of Georgia. Prior to coming to Montefiore, she was a faculty member of the Atlanta Medical Centers Internal Medicine Residency Program and director of the Diabetes Metabolic Center. Prevalence of diabetes in minority populations Importance of healthy lifestyle in managing diabetes Director of the Clinical Diabetes Center, Weiler Hospital, Montefiore Medicine Center Professor of Clinical Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Dr. Zonszein is certified by the American Boards of "Internal Medicine", "Endocrinology and Metabolism", and "Nuclear Medicine". He is a co-investigator in the Albert Einstein College of Medicine Diabetes Research and Training Center (DRTC), and collaborated in landmark NIH clinically trials such as the Diabetes Control and Complication Trial (DCCT), and the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). He is the principal investigator of the "Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes" (BARI2D) an ongoing NIH sponsored study to elucidate the best management of ischemic coronary heart disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. He has a special interest in understanding cardiovascular disease in individuals with diabetes and or the metabolic syndrome. He continues to collaborate in several projects for diabetes care delivery systems in underserved minority populations, and he participates as a faculty member in the Albert Einstein College o Continue reading >>

Expert Advice On Preventing Diabetes

Expert Advice On Preventing Diabetes

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. Editor's note: A study published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that lifestyle changes, such as weight loss or increased physical activity, are more effective in preventing diabetes than the commonly prescribed drug Glucophage. Below, several diabetes experts answer questions to help explain the significance of this study. What are the implications of the Diabetes Prevention Program study, or DPP? The bottom line is that when interventions (diet, exercise, certain diabeticmedications) are introduced early in the natural history of diabetes, it is possible to make a significant impact. Currently only 15 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are controlled with diet andexercise alone. The main reason for this is that they are too far advanced intheir natural history and multiple drugs/insulin are needed to control thediabetes, which is also not easy. I believe there are the following implications of this study:1. It is possible to prevent or delay this super-common and potentiallydevastating disease.2. Early intervention is of utmost importance.3. Intensive lifestyle changes are the most effective intervention and these changesdo not have to be drastic (for example, losing 10 pounds and doing aerobic exercise 150minutes a week can have a significant effect).4. Glucophage can also prevent or delay diabetes in younger, heavier people withdiabetes, but not to the same extent as lifestyle changes. Dr. Steven Edelman, professor of medicine, division of diabetes and metabolism, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Medical Center What should be the most important outcome of this study? The most important outcome of this study should be Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Answers From Diabetes Expert Dr. Rita Kalyani

Diabetes: Answers From Diabetes Expert Dr. Rita Kalyani

Diabetes is a serious disease that can lead to a number of complications, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower-extremity amputations. Dr. Rita Kalyani of the Johns Hopkins Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism clarifies common misconceptions about diabetes—a condition which affects a third of all American adults. Q: What is diabetes? A: Diabetes is a serious disease that occurs when the body cannot maintain normal levels of glucose, an important energy source. There are two major types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce insulin, a hormone that helps the body metabolize glucose. People with type 2 diabetes can still produce insulin early in the disease, but the body doesn’t appropriately respond to its effects. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that is diagnosed for the first time during pregnancy in women. Q: What is prediabetes? A: People with prediabetes have elevated blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but fall just below the criterion for diagnosing type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes, but those with prediabetes can delay or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes by making healthy lifestyle adjustments. Q: Is diabetes preventable? A: Based on current knowledge, it is not clear whether type 1 diabetes is preventable, but a healthy diet and regular exercise can dramatically decrease your risk of type 2 diabetes. Losing just 5 percent of your body weight can make a big difference. If you have type 2 diabetes, these same measures may help you manage your blood glucose without insulin. Q: How is diabetes managed? A: If you have type 1 diabetes, you’ll need to start taking insulin upon diagnosis. People with type 2 diabetes may Continue reading >>

Diabetes Expert Witness

Diabetes Expert Witness

Our network contains thousands of the world's foremost diabetes expert witnesses. Find an expert witness or gain insights by browsing our case studies and white papers below. This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. This iframe contains the logic required to handle Ajax powered Gravity Forms. During the course of his treatment, the man developed diabetes and cataractsas a result of long-term steroid use. After several months of treatment for his diabetes, the patient began to see a different physician who informed him he a middle-aged patient with a past medical history of diabetes who presented to a podiatrist with an open callous on the bottom of This case involves a middle-aged male with a past medical history of cancer who presented to the emergency room with multiple symptoms and was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis. He was intubated, admitted to the ICU, and placed on pressors. The patient involves a female patient with a past medical history of diabetes who was brought to the hospital via ambulance following a forklift in Kansaswho suffered from morbid obesity as well as diabetes, who was being followed by a vascular surgeon for a wound on her medical history significant for end-stage renal disease, diabetes, and the amputation of his right leg, who had receiveddialysis Idaho who had a previous medical historysignificant for diabetes and hepatitisc, who had been under the care of anAdvanced physician assistant who managed and followed hiscare for diabetes and hepatitis. Years passed by with the patient still complaining of This case involves a male patient who presented to his family medicine physician with complaintsof abdominal pain and weight loss, at which point he was referred to a gastroenterologist for a consultation. During Continue reading >>

28 Experts Answer Questions About Diabetes T2 & Prediabetes

28 Experts Answer Questions About Diabetes T2 & Prediabetes

A1: Diabetes is not on the decline, but rather type 2 diabetes is on the increase. The increase in T2DM correlates with our populations increase in obesity. Now, more than 2/3 of Americans are overweight or obese, and while the rate of rise may have plateaued a bit, incidence of T2DM has not. In addition, T2DM increases with age. As we are living longer, we are likely to see more diabetes. A2: I think the biggest diet mistake patients make is thinking by refraining from eating sugar, their diabetes will get better. While eating sugar or sugary products isnt great, the most important factor is weight loss. While there is varying evidence on different types of diets, in general, a calorie is a calorie. For example, a patient might eat a few pieces of candy a day, and think that if she stops this, it will improve her diabetes. In fact, it is unlikely that refraining from a few pieces of candy a day will promote enough weight loss to improve diabetes. Patients need to know that they should both eat healthy, and decrease portions . You can have an extremely healthy diet, but if your calorie content is too high because of portion sizes, then you are unlikely to lose weight and improve diabetes. I think one of the biggest management mistakes made is use of finger stick glucose monitors. The public seems to generally know about diabetics checking their sugar, and because insurance usually covers glucose monitors, they are often highly promoted by the industry. However, if you are Type 2 diabetic and are not taking insulin or a sulfonylurea, then there is no need to check your finger stick glucose even once a day. The best measure of glycemic control is A1c . Unless you are going change your diet based on your measurement of a particular foods effect on your blood sugar (which Continue reading >>

Diabetes Expert Witness Listings

Diabetes Expert Witness Listings

Welcome to ourDiabetesexpert directory. Browse the profiles below to find the right expert witness in Diabetes for your case. Our SEAK Expert Witness Database is always free to search. SEAK, Inc. is The Expert Witness Training Company. We have trained thousands of expert witnesses, through our seminars, on-site corporate training, assisting retaining counsel to prepare their witnesses, and one-on-one training for individual experts. For additional information please visit testifyingtraining.com Podiatry Expert Witness, Foot & Ankle Surgery Expert Witness - Diabetes, Adult&Pediatric Foot and Ankle Surgery, Podiatry, Wound Care, Charcot, Calcaneus/Lisfranc/Pilon fracture, Ligament, Tendon, Achilles, Sports Medicine, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Foot & Ankle Surgery, Sprain, Dislocation, Nerve Injury, Arthroscopy, Ankle Replacement, External Fixation Board Certified foot and ankle surgeon with specialty training and extensive experience in reconstructive foot and ankle surgery. She is a Fellow of the American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons, Member of the American College of Foot & Ankle Pediatrics and American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine. She has extensive experience in medical and legal aspects of foot and ankle cases including Independent Medical Evaluations, impairment rating, chart/file reviews, expert witness and depositions. Areas of Expertise include Foot and Ankle Medicine and Surgery for Adults and Pediatrics, Total Ankle Replacement, Ankle and Pilon Fracture, External Fixation of Foot/Ankle and Leg, Foot/Ankle Sprain/Fracture/Dislocation, Nerve Injury including Chronic Pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Arthroscopy, Diabetes and Foot/Ankle Pathology including Wound Care and Charcot, Calcaneus and Lisfranc Fracture, Lacerations and Puncture Wo Continue reading >>

Insulin Quality Questions Have Diabetes Experts Scrambling

Insulin Quality Questions Have Diabetes Experts Scrambling

Insulin quality questions have diabetes experts scrambling Preliminary research suggesting that some diabetes patients may be injecting medicine that has partially disintegrated is causing concern even as serious questions are raised about the research itself. The study author, a pharmacist, bought vials of insulin at a number of pharmacies and found that on average the vials had less than half of what was listed on the label and none met a minimum standard. The study tested just 18 vials of insulin far too few to be definitive and questions have been raised about the methods used to test the insulin. Insulin makers, patient advocate groups and diabetes experts say if the findings were accurate, diabetes patients would be getting sick. But given potentially serious implications for millions of diabetics, many of these groups are now trying to reassure patients in the wake of the research. All say that patients should continue to taking their insulin as prescribed. The groups are discussing how to quickly mount a major study that would ease fears by involving multiple research labs, different testing methods and many more samples of various insulin types. "We want to make sure the study, when completed, will be well accepted," said Dr. William Cefalu, the American Diabetes Association's chief scientific officer. Roughly 6 million Americans inject synthetic insulin every day. Most patients use a syringe to draw insulin from a vial, like the ones tested in the study, then inject it. An increasing number instead use simpler "pens" containing insulin cartridges, pressing them against skin to inject a dose. The study raised such alarm because without enough insulin, patients can, over time, suffer blindness, limb amputations, and life-threatening damage to the kidneys and he Continue reading >>

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet – Expert’s Panel

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet – Expert’s Panel

Diabetes management can be efficiently done by following the right diet, being active, getting enough sleep, perhaps, in some cases, taking medication as prescribed by your doctor. So many factors have to be taken into consideration when it comes to regulating your blood sugar levels in order to avoid the lows and the highs. It is recommended by experts that one keep their blood sugars in control by diet, as in, eating healthy. For that, you have to make some healthy choices. But with so many internet articles and blogs about diabetes and eating healthy out there, who do you listen to? Who should you trust? What do you eat? What should you avoid? One small mistake and you can pay with your life, in some cases. We have compiled tips and suggestions from 29 respected experts who share with you their rules on how you can control your type 2 with diet. Read on to find out what they are. 1. Karen R. Koenig, LCSW, M.Ed I encourage my clients with Type 2 Diabetes to do the following: stop dieting and labeling foods “good” or “bad” and, instead, think of them as having high or low health benefits. The diet mentality only promotes rebound eating. The goal is to develop an internal, rather than an external, locus of control. I also encourage them to learn how to become “normal” or intuitive eaters by connecting to appetite cues for hunger, fullness and satisfaction, and eating with awareness, which often means without distractions. They also need to develop effective practices to manage stress and distress without turning to food. All this can be done with an eating disorders therapist or an intuitive eating coach and by reading books on any of the above topics. 2. Kelly Devine Rickert, MS, RDN, CSSD, LDN There are two main tips I tell people to help control their typ Continue reading >>

Diabetes Expert | Blackdoctor

Diabetes Expert | Blackdoctor

Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN For many people, the thought of exercise brings back memories of the hundreds of jumping jacks, pushup, laps ... Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN Poor diabetes control can lead to diabetic neuropathiesdamage to the nerves in the body. Nerves are the messengers ... Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN Research shows most children, adolescents, and adults are not getting enough fruit in their dietsparticularly purple fruit. According ... Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN Heart disease is the leading killer of all Americans, but African Americans are hit hardest. Heart disease develops ... BDO: How Can Diabetes Effect Other Potential Diseases? Dr. James Gavin: So with respect to its relationship toother ... Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN Youve got a runny nose, sore throat, chest discomfort and fever. Is it a cold or the flu? ... Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN When it comes to diabetes and meal planning, there is no one-size-fits-all. In fact, the 2013 American Diabetes ... Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN What is clean eating? As a registered dietitian nutritionist, Im often asked that question. Although the notion of ... BDO: Why Do We See Such Higher Risks Of Diabetes In African-American? Dr. Gavin: The reason why ... Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN If you are overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes, or if you ... Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN Youve heard that weight loss is one of the best ways to manage diabetes. Losing as little as ... Dr. James R. Gavin discusses a few ways to managediabetes: BDO: What are some different ways that people ... Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN When it comes to food and diabetes, mos Continue reading >>

Diabetes Conferences | Heart Conferences |obesity Conferences | Endocrinology Conferences | Diabetes Congress |diabetes Events | Heart Congress| Heart Events | Diabetes Meetings| 2018 | Europe Usa Asia Pacific Middle East

Diabetes Conferences | Heart Conferences |obesity Conferences | Endocrinology Conferences | Diabetes Congress |diabetes Events | Heart Congress| Heart Events | Diabetes Meetings| 2018 | Europe Usa Asia Pacific Middle East

28thWorld Congress on Diabetes, Obesity & Heart, held during August 20-21, 2018 inTokyo, Japanwith theme Pioneering Spirit of enriching lives with Critical Diabetic & Heart Care. ThisDiabetes & Heart Experts Conference 2018includes Keynote presentations, Speaker talks, Poster presentations, Exhibition, Symposia and Workshops. This congress will help in networking and teaming up with diabetes, obesity and heart experts, leading renowned speakers, cardiologists, diabetologists, nutritionists/ dieticians, doctors, scientists, physicians, surgeons showcasing their research from USA, Korea, Australia, Singapore, Germany, Denmark, Canada etc. Be a part of this exciting event where innovations, advanced practices and researches on various divisions ofDiabetes,ObesityandHeart shared and discussed by experts across the globe. Diabetes may be a common chronic illness that imposes right smart demands on the individual tending system. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus , Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Gestational Diabetes .Mellitus are the types of diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus outcomes from the auto-immune destruction of the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas . Type 1 diabetes can be depicted from type 2 diabetes by auto-antibody testing and C-peptide test. Type 1 diabetes represents 10% of all diabetic cases. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by insulin resistance and relative absence of insulin . Approximately 90% of patients suffer from type 2 diabetes . Sudden raise in the blood glucose levels due to placental hormones, during pregnancy leads Gestational Diabetes Mellitus . In addition to this, Type 3 Diabetes Mellitus is portrayed by the insulin resistance to brain which leads to Alzheimers disease. Diabetes Conference | Clinical Diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Experts Team

Diabetes Experts Team

Meet our team: World-class researchers, scientists, physicians and operational experts lead the endocrine and metabolic team at PPD. Their commitment to excellence and dedication to our clients success are equaled only by their vast experience and expertise. Drug developers look to them for insight, guidance, assurance and solutionsand they deliver. Every time. Vice President, Global Therapeutic Area Head,Cardiovascular, Metabolic Global Project Management Leadership in strategy direction, business operations and operational delivery of the global cardiovascular/metabolic therapeutic area. Sandy Sturman is vice president and global therapeutic area head of global project management for cardiovascular/metabolic. In this position, she is responsible for the strategy direction, business operations and operational delivery of the global cardiovascular/metabolic therapeutic area. Her leadership includes managing a team of directors, associate directors and project managers responsible for about 60 cardiovascular/metabolic projects at any given time. Vice President, Therapeutic Area Head, Cardiovascular, Global Product Development Leading the cardiovascular therapeutic area strategic team. Puneet Mohan joined PPDs global product development team in 2012 to serve as vice president and therapeutic area head of cardiovascular diseases. In this role, Dr. Mohan leads the cardiovascular therapeutic area strategic team and serves as a key adviser and consultant to clients in developing and conducting clinical programs in these areas. Continue reading >>

Insulin Quality Questions Have Diabetes Experts Scrambling

Insulin Quality Questions Have Diabetes Experts Scrambling

Insulin quality questions have diabetes experts scrambling Insulin quality questions have diabetes experts scrambling TRENTON, N.J. (AP) Preliminary research suggesting that some diabetes patients may be injecting medicine that has partially disintegrated is causing concern even as serious questions are raised about the research itself. The study author, a pharmacist, bought vials of insulin at a number of pharmacies and found that on average the vials had less than half of what was listed on the label and none met a minimum standard. The study tested just 18 vials of insulin far too few to be definitive and questions have been raised about the methods used to test the insulin. Insulin makers, patient advocate groups and diabetes experts say if the findings were accurate, diabetes patients would be getting sick. But given potentially serious implications for millions of diabetics, many of these groups are now trying to reassure patients in the wake of the research. All say that patients should continue to taking their insulin as prescribed. The groups are discussing how to quickly mount a major study that would ease fears by involving multiple research labs, different testing methods and many more samples of various insulin types. "We want to make sure the study, when completed, will be well accepted," said Dr. William Cefalu, the American Diabetes Association's chief scientific officer. Roughly 6 million Americans inject synthetic insulin every day. Most patients use a syringe to draw insulin from a vial, like the ones tested in the study, then inject it. An increasing number instead use simpler "pens" containing insulin cartridges, pressing them against skin to inject a dose. The study raised such alarm because without enough insulin, patients can, over time, suffer Continue reading >>

One Drop | Experts: Diabetes Support At Your Fingertips

One Drop | Experts: Diabetes Support At Your Fingertips

One Drop | Experts: Diabetes Support at Your Fingertips People with diabetes and pre-diabetes around the world use One Drop | Mobile our free iPhone , Apple Watch , and Android app. Last week we released our One Drop | Experts program. Now, users can get access to a certified diabetes educator for 24/7 information, tips, and support. People whove usedOne Drop | Experts are experiencing real results! How do we know? Users and experts tell us, and our data speaks for itself. Were rigorously evaluating what we doto understand itsimpact. Heres what were learning from people like Paul. When Paul was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, his doctor gave him a prescription and very little advice. Paul took hismedication without knowing if they helped, and triedto eat healthy without knowing what that meant. Then he lost his job, andemotionally ate to deal with his stress and lack of confidence. Paulsdiabetes took a back seat until he discovered One Drop. We invited people like Paul to try One Drop | Mobile and One Drop | Experts for the past three months. Heres what happened. Peopletracking food and blood glucose with One Drop | Mobile and One Drop | Experts: Consistently tracked their food and blood glucose over time Reduced their average blood glucose reading by 15% (27 mg/dL) Loweredtheir average blood glucose from 185 mg/dL (A1c 8.1%) to 158 mg/dL (A1c 7.1%) Reduced their average percentage of high blood glucose readings from 18.5% to 3.7% Increased their average number of in-range blood glucose readings from 8.4 in range to 13.6 in range i.e., they achieved 40% more in-range readings Which brings us back to Paul, and a lot of people like him. Pauls learned more about diabetes in the last three months than in the last six years since his diagnosis. He knows what to eat and is w Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: From The Experts [videos] | Everyday Health

Type 2 Diabetes: From The Experts [videos] | Everyday Health

What is Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL? Prescription Toujeo is a long-acting insulin used to control blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus. Toujeo contains 3 times as much insulin in 1 mL as standard insulin (100 Units/mL) Toujeo is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis Important Safety Information for Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL Do not take Toujeo if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens even if the needle has been changed. Before starting Toujeo, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Toujeo. Your treatment with TZDs and Toujeo may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Tell your doctor about all medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Toujeo should be taken at the same time once a day. Test your blood sugar levels daily while using insulin, including Toujeo. Do not make changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your doctor. Verify you have the correct insulin before each injection. Your dose for Toujeo may be different from other insulins you have taken. Any change of insulin should be made c Continue reading >>

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